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Flash
33440.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 7:21 am Reply with quote

"interesting deaths", perhaps? post 18739

 
Mostly Harmless
33457.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 7:53 am Reply with quote

..


Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Sun Jan 08, 2006 4:00 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Fifi
33520.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 11:40 am Reply with quote

Natalie wrote:
People that have the surname "Death" usually pronounce it "De-ath".

Seems daft to me...


my brother's GP is Dr. Death, while my brother pronounces it "death", especially when they play hocky together i think it is general practise as the surgery to refer to him as Dr. "De-ath".

and i was going to mention Spike Milligan, but also wasn't it Oscar Wilde who was supposed to have said "either the wallpaper goes or i do!"

 
samivel
33554.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 1:10 pm Reply with quote

Apparently....

 
geoffo
33691.  Wed Nov 23, 2005 5:03 am Reply with quote

when are you officially dead by law??????

 
Caradoc
33940.  Wed Nov 23, 2005 7:16 pm Reply with quote

When a doctor says so. For example if you start giving artificial respiration to a casualty if you stop before a doctor arrives or medics take over the task you will be commiting a criminal offence

 
Flash
33987.  Thu Nov 24, 2005 4:57 am Reply with quote

In France there's a law which says you have to intervene to save people's lives if you can, but I didn't know there was an equivalent law in this country.

 
geoffo
33996.  Thu Nov 24, 2005 5:39 am Reply with quote

Mostly harmless wrote:
I wonder..who has the most famous (or infamous) of last words..


my father- "AGH"

 
Caradoc
35204.  Sat Nov 26, 2005 7:54 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
In France there's a law which says you have to intervene to save people's lives if you can, but I didn't know there was an equivalent law in this country.


The French law requires a passer by to give assistance, under English law you are perfectly free to ignore a casualty, but if you do start helping you are deemed to be responsible for the casualty until replaced by someone better qualified. The legislation relating to first aid in work is getting ludicrous as well, if you are not currently qualified you can’t even put a plaster on someone’s cut, they can self administer though.

I do like the story from 999 or one of its ilk when a climber in Scotland suffered a fall & shortly after landing with a broken spine was approached by two hill walkers, one of whom said “Don’t worry I’m a doctor & my friend is a consultant neurosurgeon”.

 
samivel
35210.  Sat Nov 26, 2005 8:02 pm Reply with quote

What are the chances of that?

 
ficklefiend
35556.  Sun Nov 27, 2005 5:13 pm Reply with quote

[quote="Carl"]
Flash wrote:

The French law requires a passer by to give assistance, under English law you are perfectly free to ignore a casualty


Unless you have been trained, which is why my friend who is doing nursing at uni carries a plastic sheet thing used when giving mouth-to-mouth in her purse.

 
Jenny
35578.  Sun Nov 27, 2005 5:35 pm Reply with quote

A dental dam? I wonder if there's a D-related question around dental dams, that is suitable for transmission to a family audience.

 
markvent
42520.  Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:01 pm Reply with quote

In the Spanish Pyrenees, when a beekeeper dies, each of his bees is splashed with a drop of Black Ink.

About 100 people choke to death on ballpoint pens each year.

Dr. Alice Chase, who wrote , possibly with a ballpoint pen, 'Nutrition for Health', died of malnutrition.

When Mahatma Gandhi died, an autopsy revealed that his small intestine contained five gold Krugerrands.

When Thomas Edison died in 1941; Henry Ford captured his last dying breath in a bottle.

moderately interesting at least :)

 
Psychosis_Safari
42523.  Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:19 pm Reply with quote

I choked on a ballpoint pen a few years ago...fortunately not to death, otherwise i would have been part of that statistic!


Alexandros I of Greece died in 1920 from blood poisoning after being bitten by his pet monkey.

Nicholas Breakspear who, as Adrian IV became the only English Pope, choked to death on a fly he’d accidentally swallowed.

The son of George II, Prince Frederick, should have succeeded him as king. But Frederick was hit by a cricket ball and died in 1715.

 
Flash
42526.  Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:35 pm Reply with quote

Welcome, Mark. You can't be expected to know this, but on this site we try not to simply cut'n'paste from lists of 'trivia' found elswhere on the web. The idea here is to look behind these assertions (and others less pervasive) and consider whether they're true, how we know, and hopefully to find the interesting stuff that underlies them, rather than simply to re-state the commonplace statement. A google search on the words 'Gandhi krugerrands', for example, gives a very long list of links to pages containing this passage:
Quote:
when Mahatma Gandhi died, an autopsy revealed five gold Krugerrands in his small intestine. Aardvarks are allergic to radishes, but only during The summer.
so we don't add much to the store of human knwledge by simply re-stating the assertion here.

On the other hand, folks hereabouts may well be interested to know why he had these krugerrands (if he did) - especially if you are able to find out by means of some original research.

 

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