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What's in a font

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Is comic sans the font of the Devil?
Yes
18%
 18%  [ 3 ]
No
68%
 68%  [ 11 ]
Never seen it
12%
 12%  [ 2 ]
Total Votes : 16

monzac
755651.  Wed Oct 27, 2010 9:49 pm Reply with quote

Thanks.

What I got was for reading 'normal.dot' as 'normal.doc', so I changed the default under each of the style options. It's left me with no space at the top of the page. I'll fix it when I go home, because I don't have my own computer here at work.

 
monzac
755660.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:20 am Reply with quote

Done :)

Thanks.

 
'yorz
755714.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 6:56 am Reply with quote

I'm sure someone can help me find an example of wedding invites/funeral booklets rendered totally unreadable by writing the entire text in very elaborate capitals - kinda pseudo classical fonts.
Infuriating.


Last edited by 'yorz on Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:01 am; edited 1 time in total

 
RLDavies
755757.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:59 am Reply with quote

The Top 10 Fonts You Should Delete

 
MinervaMoon
755812.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:08 pm Reply with quote

I agreed until they dissed Copperplate!

 
Ion Zone
755833.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:24 pm Reply with quote

I don't see what's so bad about any of them, really. I think the worst ones are more the Faux Greek, Bamboo (not the bamboo you're thinking of) and Bamboo's successors, such as this unusable aberration.


Another example

 
MinervaMoon
755859.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 4:19 pm Reply with quote

A font should not distract or detract from what you're trying to say. In the case of the common offenders Comic Sans and Papyrus, they're so overbearing in themselves that it becomes intrusive. I used to like Papyrus too, when I was about twelve; it's not inherently offensive (unlike the childish stylings of Comic Sans or Kristin ITC). But it seems to draw the amateur eye to the degree of overuse, and nowadays it smacks of either cutsieness or pretension.

 
barbados
755862.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 4:41 pm Reply with quote

Fonts are like everything else in presentation. Each of them are ok in their place.

I use Segoe Print as my headed paper, and on my website, because it's different enough to be interesting, but not too overpowering. It is almost a comic sans lite.

I would never dream of using it in a letter, that would then be the same as using any other handwriting style of font, and look like the letter is from a child.

Use the fancy font where you need the impact, where you want to give information a more professional looking typeface is required.

 
suze
755885.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 6:10 pm Reply with quote

Windows used to come with a font called First Grade, which was supposed to represent the handwriting of six year olds.

It was quite good fun, although the only time I actually used it was in a note supposedly written by a teddy bear (don't ask ...).

 
tchrist
755893.  Thu Oct 28, 2010 7:58 pm Reply with quote

May I please recommend to you readers of this delightfully amusing thread The Elements of Typographic Style, by Robert Bringhurst? I think you'd enjoy it.

--tom

 
RLDavies
756345.  Sat Oct 30, 2010 9:01 am Reply with quote

Just found this blog yesterday. It's a good 'un:

I Love Typography

 
Efros
1295544.  Sun Sep 16, 2018 4:03 pm Reply with quote

Resurrecting this thread as I stumbled upon this.



Unfortunately they are heavily monetizing this with a yearly license fee. Don't have too much experience in buying font licenses but I was under the impression it was a one off fee not an annual one.

 
cornixt
1295610.  Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:09 am Reply with quote

It looks like lower case b, p, and d will still have the rotate/flip issue. So do u and n. Which letters do they think they fixed, the ones that aren't a problem in many fonts anyway: e and a? I and l?

 
Jenny
1295617.  Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:27 am Reply with quote

P and q can't rotate in that font - look at the q in 'unique' in that sample. B and d are more similar, but it looks to me as if the curves of the b and d are subtly different - the curve on the b is more squished in and curves up more at the bottom than the d. U and n are less problematic I think, in that they're less confusable.

 
suze
1295624.  Mon Sep 17, 2018 11:29 am Reply with quote

That lower case <q> isn't really lower case at all, it's a small cap. I dare say that's allowable in the circumstances for which the font was created, but I have to agree with cornixt that you'd need to know the differences between the font's <b>, <d>, and <p>, and between its <n> and <u>, for their non-identicalness to be useful.

All the major word processors allow one to adjust kerning and spacing anyway, so I fear that this font may have to be considered a missed opportunity. Worse, it's dangerously close to the dreaded Comic Sans.

 

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