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An eek-name

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Maaaud
749534.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 1:57 pm Reply with quote

A query from the Hoaxes episode.

An eek-name becomes a nick-name. Sean Locke asks where an eek-name comes from. Is it to do with the medieval word 'eek' meaning 'also'? IE an also-name?

Or a nalso-name, I suppose.

Can anyone confirm or deny?

 
monzac
749545.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 2:28 pm Reply with quote

Yes, and it still exists in the form of 'eke' as in to extend, increase or augment. So a nickname is an additional name.

 
Maaaud
749548.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 2:34 pm Reply with quote

Ace, thank you.

 
monzac
749552.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 2:48 pm Reply with quote

S'ok. Welcome to the forum, by the way :)

And it's monz, not Ace ;)

 
Janet H
749556.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 3:06 pm Reply with quote

How nice to vada your jolly old eek.

(as Julian and Sandy used to say)

 
Jenny
749560.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 3:19 pm Reply with quote

Welcome Maaaud :-)

 
Sadurian Mike
749577.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 3:48 pm Reply with quote

I thought an "eek" was an excited "ook".

 
Spud McLaren
749625.  Tue Oct 05, 2010 5:23 pm Reply with quote

No - it's a Mexican "ik".

Welcome Maaaud!

 
monzac
749683.  Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:41 am Reply with quote

Janet H wrote:
How nice to vada your jolly old eek.

(as Julian and Sandy used to say)

Bona ;)

 
mckeonj
749697.  Wed Oct 06, 2010 4:10 am Reply with quote

Actually, it's eke, not eek.
Moving on, here's a little puzzle for future philologists.
When they are reading old documents from this age, they may come across the word aka attached to a name, and conclude that this is a variant form of eke.
Why would this be a wrong conclusion?

 
tetsabb
749705.  Wed Oct 06, 2010 5:05 am Reply with quote

At the risk of a *klaxon*, I would say that aka is an acronym for 'also known as'

tetsabb, aka Joe Tetsab, aka Nick, aka 'that little weird bloke'

 
masterfroggy
749712.  Wed Oct 06, 2010 5:46 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
Actually, it's eke, not eek.
Moving on, here's a little puzzle for future philologists.
When they are reading old documents from this age, they may come across the word aka attached to a name, and conclude that this is a variant form of eke.
Why would this be a wrong conclusion?
Well if it was old medical documents, it might mean the person lost a limb above the knee.

 
mckeonj
749714.  Wed Oct 06, 2010 6:04 am Reply with quote

We know our acronyms, but our future philologist might not.
No klaxon, but -10 points for not answering the question.

 
zomgmouse
749741.  Wed Oct 06, 2010 8:36 am Reply with quote

The name Nancy came about in a similar fashion to the orange and the nickname; people used to say "mine" with people's names, so "mine Anne" became "my Nan", and Nan became Nancy.

 
RLDavies
749995.  Thu Oct 07, 2010 4:39 am Reply with quote

zomgmouse wrote:
The name Nancy came about in a similar fashion to the orange and the nickname; people used to say "mine" with people's names, so "mine Anne" became "my Nan", and Nan became Nancy.

"My" becomes "mine" (and "thy" becomes "thine") before any vowel, not just names.

 

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