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Name a famous story from 1001 (Arabian) nights

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Spud McLaren
746342.  Sat Sep 25, 2010 9:35 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
... forotten...
Oooh, good word! Does it mean unmemorably rotton?

 
Zebra57
746356.  Sat Sep 25, 2010 10:08 am Reply with quote

Hi bgkd

I am glad that you realised that the Seven Voyages of Sinbad are in 1001 Nights (vol 6)

I understand that Burton altered some of the stories when they were translated into English including the ending for Sinbad's voyages.

The Miser and the Loaves of Bread is a good story from the original series.

Some writers refer to Ali Baba and Aladdin as "orphan stories"

Burton appears to have included Ali Baba whereas the French translator Galland is apparently the first to include Aladdin.

I always have found Aladdin confusing being set in China which seems to be Arabic in culture!

 
bgkdavis
746464.  Sat Sep 25, 2010 8:31 pm Reply with quote

Yes, I have found references to the ending of Sinbad having been changed, but still a little foggy on whether Sindbad are stories from the Arabic original Scheherazade tale, or a later set of stories grafted into the framework.

There appears to be a lot of criticism over Burton's translations.

 
Zebra57
746581.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 7:30 am Reply with quote

bgkd

To identify the "authentic" collection of stories would be impossible.
Many of them I understand originated from India and came to Arabic literature via Persia.

Therefore they have been added to and altered over centuries long before Richard Burton came on the scene.

The stories in question were put into Galland's 18th century translation. He added the orphan stories to text from the oral tradition of Arabian storytellers.

Incidentally Burton is not the only translation into English. Edward Lane and John Payne also attempted to translate from Arabic.

Galland made the stories popular but like the Canterbury Tales some stories are sexually exlicit which makes the modern idea of 1001 Nights as children's stories questionable.

 
'yorz
746681.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 1:04 pm Reply with quote

As as for illustrations, what can beat Edmund Dulac's?


Last edited by 'yorz on Mon Sep 27, 2010 4:48 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
746729.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 5:53 pm Reply with quote

My parents had an edition of 1001 Nights, which I read when I was fairly young - maybe 9 or 10 - which was not actually an expurgated edition. I learned a great deal from that book. However, the word used to denote sexual intercourse was 'clipping' which I had not heard before but figured out from the context.

 
Zebra57
746746.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 7:17 pm Reply with quote

I always wondered what a clippie did. I was told they took the fares.

 
Efros
746754.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 7:59 pm Reply with quote

That would be a different sort of ride.

 
bgkdavis
747020.  Mon Sep 27, 2010 10:22 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
My parents had an edition of 1001 Nights, which I read when I was fairly young - maybe 9 or 10 - which was not actually an expurgated edition. I learned a great deal from that book. However, the word used to denote sexual intercourse was 'clipping' which I had not heard before but figured out from the context.


would that make kiss-n-tell stories, synonymous with 'press clippings'

 
Jenny
747485.  Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:25 pm Reply with quote

Ooh good one, bgkd :-)

 
gerontius grumpus
753240.  Tue Oct 19, 2010 2:30 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
My parents had an edition of 1001 Nights, which I read when I was fairly young - maybe 9 or 10 - which was not actually an expurgated edition. I learned a great deal from that book. However, the word used to denote sexual intercourse was 'clipping' which I had not heard before but figured out from the context.


This is quite interesting, clipping, I mean.
Every year in Painswick they have a clipping ceremony in which the parishioners join hands and form a huge circle around the 99 or 101 yew trees in the churchyard. Clipping in this sense is supposed to mean enclose or surround. Could it be of the same origin as the use of the word in the Arabian nights?

 

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