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the race to 500-in roman numerals!

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Sophie.A
741027.  Wed Sep 08, 2010 5:01 am Reply with quote

dr bartolo wrote:
as if you thaught IIII was weied, another way of writing IX was VIIII-you can see this on some tarot decks....

There is something to be said for writing 9 as VIIII rather than IX. If you use IX, then only the numbers 18 will be in alphabetical order in Roman numerals. By writing 9 as VIIII, 19 as XVIIII, etc, and 40 as XXXX, you can extend the alphabetical sequence from 1 to 49. (4 can be written as IV or IIII without affecting the alphabetical order.)

 
Iamtheelephant616
742782.  Mon Sep 13, 2010 10:14 am Reply with quote

Sophie.A wrote:
dr bartolo wrote:
as if you thaught IIII was weied, another way of writing IX was VIIII-you can see this on some tarot decks....

There is something to be said for writing 9 as VIIII rather than IX. If you use IX, then only the numbers 18 will be in alphabetical order in Roman numerals. By writing 9 as VIIII, 19 as XVIIII, etc, and 40 as XXXX, you can extend the alphabetical sequence from 1 to 49. (4 can be written as IV or IIII without affecting the alphabetical order.)


Skip to V:LIII. That was my reaction to reading that↑. :P.

 
'yorz
747564.  Wed Sep 29, 2010 5:37 am Reply with quote

That's brilliant! Never seen them before! :D

Anyhoo: the Belgians have tried verbalising the Roman numerals with saying septante (soixante-dix) and nonante (quatre-vingt- dix). Sweeeet.

 
Iamtheelephant616
748285.  Fri Oct 01, 2010 10:22 am Reply with quote

Wow, I have a lot of American friends so someone who hasn't seen Jeff Dunham seems a tad odd to me. :P. I don't want to derail this thread, so let me know if you'd like me to send you some links. :).

Anyway, surely the way to verbalise roman numerals would be to just say them as the letters? I.e. "em em ex*" for MMX or whatever? However, whilst learning French, I always did think they should just say septante, and especially huitante. (after all, sixty and ten for seventy is bad enough, but four twenties for eighty always did seem ridiculous. :P.) So yeah, it is sweeeet. ;) :P.

 
Iamtheelephant616
748287.  Fri Oct 01, 2010 10:24 am Reply with quote

On another note, it does seem this thread is becoming more of a discussion, and quite an interesting one, too, afaic. Perhaps it should be moved to GB? :).

 
dr bartolo
748305.  Fri Oct 01, 2010 10:57 am Reply with quote

indeed. it should.

 
exnihilo
748313.  Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:18 am Reply with quote

The French system isn't so weird when you think about it, many languages employ counting in twenties or 'scores'. In English, just to take the most obvious examples, people refer to having their threescore and ten years (70) and Abe Lincoln talked about fourscore and seven years ago (87) in the Gettysburg Address.

 
'yorz
748319.  Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:33 am Reply with quote

In Dutch we turn things around:

44 = vier en veertig
21 = een en twintig

Twenty-one makes more sense. I think.

 
dr bartolo
748340.  Fri Oct 01, 2010 1:23 pm Reply with quote

welll. just check out the german for 21
ein-und-zwanzig
or
einundzwanzig
lit. one and tewnty
similar huh?

 
tetsabb
748346.  Fri Oct 01, 2010 2:29 pm Reply with quote

'Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie'
I would guess that 'sixteen' 'seventeen' etc are contractions of 'six and ten'
SUZE!!!!!

 
dr bartolo
748578.  Sat Oct 02, 2010 12:38 pm Reply with quote

well... the french for 15 is " quinze"

 
Efros
748583.  Sat Oct 02, 2010 12:51 pm Reply with quote

I have a vague recollection from my school French that quinze is French for a fortnight as well.

 
Sophie.A
749046.  Mon Oct 04, 2010 5:07 am Reply with quote

exnihilo wrote:
The French system isn't so weird when you think about it, many languages employ counting in twenties or 'scores'. In English, just to take the most obvious examples, people refer to having their threescore and ten years (70) and Abe Lincoln talked about fourscore and seven years ago (87) in the Gettysburg Address.

The Danish system is weirder.

    20 = tyve
    30 = tredive
    40 = fyrre
    50 = halvtreds
    60 = tres
    70 = halvfjerds
    80 = firs
    90 = halvfems

 
DVD Smith
1268976.  Sun Dec 31, 2017 12:09 pm Reply with quote

Jigsaw puzzles are wrongly named. They're supposedly named after the tool that was used to cut the pieces, but in fact the pieces were cut using another type of saw called a fretsaw. [1]

The largest commercially-available jigsaw puzzle is "Memorable Disney Moments" by Ravensburger, which has 40,320 pieces. You can buy it on Amazon for 295. [2]

The largest jigsaw ever made was completed in 2002 at an airport in Hong Kong. It had 21,600 pieces, with each piece measuring 0.5m by 0.5m, and was assembled by 777 people. The final puzzle was larger than an American football field. [3]

 
GuyBarry
1268979.  Sun Dec 31, 2017 12:42 pm Reply with quote

What thread was this meant to go in please? I've seen some odd posts on this forum, but reviving a seven-year-old thread to post something completely unconnected with the subject-matter is bizarre even by most standards...

(Or is it a new kind of quiz? :-))

 

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