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Derbyshire

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samivel
32183.  Thu Nov 17, 2005 4:58 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
Samuel Plimsoll, famous for drawing lines on the side of ships


You'd be given an ASBO for that nowadays

 
eggshaped
32250.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 7:38 am Reply with quote

Maybe he should have got an ASBO. Regarding the Act of Parliament which included the regulation about the Plimsoll-line, not long before a vote was to be taken, Disraeli announced that the Government had decided to withdraw the bill.

Quote:
[Plimsoll] was so shocked and furious that he lost control of himself, flung the word "villain" to the Prime Minister and Government side, and shook his fist at the Speaker of the House of Commons.

The uproar in the House was terrific, but before long it became obvious that the public shared Plimsoll's point of view; he apologized to Mr. Speaker, the bill was passed, and in 1876 it became compulsory for every foreign-going British ship to carry a maximum load line on her side.


http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/usque-ad-mare/chapter09-04_e.htm

 
djgordy
32290.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 9:34 am Reply with quote

Some Derbyshire words and sayings:

'Wrong side o't'brook' - The brook refers to the river Erewash which marks the boundary between Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, so 'wrong side o't'brook refers to Nottinghamshire. Derbyshire people have no particular emnity with Nottinghamshire folk - as long as they don't support Nottingham Forest.

'Ah'm a Derbyshire man, born and bred, strong i't'arm and wick i't'head'. The first part of this is self-evident. The second part does not mean 'weak in the head' as some people think. Rather, it means quick as in lively, from the Old Englsih Cwick.

'Gnat's cod' - a short distance. Humphret Littleton on I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue used to refer to a 'gant's crotchet' in the same way.

'Rammel" - worthless rubbish. Probably from ramale, which is latin for a dead bough cut from a tree.

'Frumerty' - A kind of barley gruel. There was a similar word in Hardy's Mayor of Casterbridge, though I don't have a copy to hand to check.

'Brahma' - meaning good. Comes from the Hindu and was brought back by troops serving in India.

'Doolally' - also brough back from India. Meaning mad or crazy it derives from Deolalie near Bombay where troops would wait to be shipped home

 
Jenny
32299.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 9:49 am Reply with quote

Some of these are native to Yorkshire too - my father used to say 'Yorkshire born and Yorkshire bred, strong i'th'arm and weak (not wick!) i'th'head. We also say 'wrong side of the Pennines' to refer to Lancastrians.

'Brahma' and 'doolally' are army terms from India, rather than Derbyshire terms I think. Again, my dad used both of those.

I've heard of 'frumenty', sometimes called 'furmenty', which was a wheat porridge - recipe here. Again, not specific to Derbyshire though, I think.

 
Quaint Idiot
32310.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 10:29 am Reply with quote

And there's flummery, which before meaning flattery was an oat pudding or porridge, from the Welsh word llymru, which I think means just about the same thing. I'm sure Gaazy can correct me if I'm wrong.

 
djgordy
32313.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 10:33 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Some of these are native to Yorkshire too - my father used to say 'Yorkshire born and Yorkshire bred, strong i'th'arm and weak (not wick!) i'th'head. We also say 'wrong side of the Pennines' to refer to Lancastrians.


Ah! But Yorkshire people are weak i't'head compared to Derbyshire people.

Most sayings and phrases have equivalents in other regions as they will derive from common roots, usually Old or Middle English. It is interesting to see the variations. Derbyshire shares a lot of its dialect with the lesser counties of Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and South Yorkshire and with instruction, even the most scranny Mester from wrong side o't'brook can be larned t'talk proper.

 
samivel
32417.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 2:01 pm Reply with quote

I think it's 'furmity' in Hardy


Last edited by samivel on Fri Nov 18, 2005 3:43 pm; edited 2 times in total

 
djgordy
32424.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 2:14 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
I think it's 'frumity' in Hardy


Having checked I think it was Frumenty in Hardy.

It is 'fermenty' or 'fromity' in Suffolk.

A version of the Bible printed in 1551 says: '" And ye shall eat neither bread, nor parched corn, nor frumenty of new corne, untill the selfe same daye that ye have brought an offering unto your God." Pharisees 23 v 14.

 
djgordy
32434.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 2:36 pm Reply with quote

This is not unique to Derbyshire but is quite interesting.

In September of 1868 a 14 man cricket squad from the Aboriginal Djabwurrung tribe played a South Derbyshire team. The Djabwurrungs came from the Lake Wallace area of Victoria.

 
samivel
32460.  Fri Nov 18, 2005 3:56 pm Reply with quote

The Oxford Classics edition of The Mayor of Casterbridge has 'furmity', but it may be that other editions use different spellings.

 
geoffo
33737.  Wed Nov 23, 2005 9:17 am Reply with quote



ah bakewell tarts-lovely girls!

 
dr.bob
33772.  Wed Nov 23, 2005 11:21 am Reply with quote

Except in bakewell itself, of course, where the pastry is referred to as a bakewell pudding and therefore the joke doesn't quite work.

Although I believe a bakewell pudding is subtly different from the more commonly available bakewell tart.

 
djgordy
33807.  Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:49 pm Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Except in bakewell itself, of course, where the pastry is referred to as a bakewell pudding and therefore the joke doesn't quite work.

Although I believe a bakewell pudding is subtly different from the more commonly available bakewell tart.


Ok, let's get this right. The pudding made in Bakewell is Bakewell Pudding. The origin of the stuff is here:

http://www.derbyshireguide.co.uk/travel/bakewell.htm

Although some people use the names "Bakewell Pudding" and Bakewell Tart" interchangeably, ths is incorrect.

The Bakewell tart appears to be the invention of a cake maker who shares his surname with the winner of the 1907 Nobel Prize for Literature.

 
Mostly Harmless
34317.  Thu Nov 24, 2005 9:31 pm Reply with quote

..


Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 9:00 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Anna
34350.  Fri Nov 25, 2005 5:49 am Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
http://www.derbyshireguide.co.uk/travel/bakewell.htm

The end of the disclaimer on that site made me laugh. =D

Quote:
Should you decline to comply with this warning, a leather winged demon of the night will soar from the deep malevolent caverns of the white peak into the shadowy moonlit sky and, with a thirst for blood on its salivating fangs, search the very threads of time for the throbbing of your heartbeat. Just thought you'd want to know that.

 

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