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Zebra57
875172.  Tue Jan 03, 2012 7:26 pm Reply with quote

QI is that from 1808 until 1815 Rio de Janeiro was the capital city of Portugal. For another ten years it was the capital of the unified Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarve.

 
Jenny
875330.  Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:07 pm Reply with quote

That's interesting Zebra - didn't know that one.

 
CB27
999280.  Sat May 25, 2013 8:26 pm Reply with quote

When people talk about the lack of freedoms in countries around the world, we often assume the freedoms we enjoy in the UK are not that dissimilar to other European countries, so it's a bit of a surprise to learn that in Portugal the journalist Miguel Sousa Tavares has been arrested for calling the country's President a clown.

Incredibly, simply calling the President a clown could land Sousa Tavares in jail for up to three years if the courts take a hardline view.

How a modern country could still have such laws is beyond me...

 
Kowalchuk
1185538.  Mon Apr 04, 2016 8:36 pm Reply with quote

Recently discovered that Portugal appears to be the only tri-continental country. Two of the Azores on the American plate, and the Madeiras are on the African plate. Anyone can think of other countries where the country proper (not overseas dependencies) spans three or more continents?

 
Alfred E Neuman
1185540.  Tue Apr 05, 2016 1:43 am Reply with quote

Aren't the Azores and Madeira overseas then?

 
AlmondFacialBar
1185565.  Tue Apr 05, 2016 4:02 am Reply with quote

Nope, they count as off-shore islands.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Alfred E Neuman
1185623.  Tue Apr 05, 2016 8:41 am Reply with quote

But they're over the sea.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1185626.  Tue Apr 05, 2016 8:48 am Reply with quote

So is Robben Island overseas, too? After all you do need to cross a bit of the Atlantic from Cape Town to get there.

As in, I think we need to talk definitions here.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1185649.  Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:33 am Reply with quote

Kowalchuk seems to be arguing that Açores and Madeira are integral parts of Portugal rather than "colonies".

Whether that is really true is open to debate. The Balearic and Canary Islands are in effect "counties" of Spain. They have the same status as Catalunya, Andalucía, and the others on the mainland, they elect MPs to the Spanish parliament, they have football teams in the Spanish leagues, and all the rest of it.

Therefore, one absolutely could argue that part of Spain - the part where I am right now, in fact - is geologically in Africa.

Britain has offshore possessions which work both ways. The Isle of Wight is a county, and is considered an integral part of England. But the Isle of Man isn't any more than the Falkland Islands are; it doesn't send an MP to Westminster, it has a Prime Minister (in Manx, Ard Shirveishagh) all of its own, and so on. Accordingly, the Isle of Man and the Falkland Islands are not integral parts of the United Kingdom.

So to Açores and Madeira. These two territories have the status of Regiões Autónomas, and the Republic of Portugal is considered to comprise Portugal Continental and its two Regiões Autónomas. They have their own parliaments and governments and have limited powers to make their own laws. On the other hand, they do also elect members to the Portuguese parliament in Lisbon. Then again, the Portuguese parliament also has members who represent Rest of the World; unlike in most countries, there are MPs who are solely elected by emigrants.

So you could argue either way as whether Açores and Madeira should be considered integral parts of Portugal or not. If you choose to argue that they are, does any other country lie on three continents. France?

 
AlmondFacialBar
1185685.  Tue Apr 05, 2016 4:25 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Kowalchuk seems to be arguing that Açores and Madeira are integral parts of Portugal rather than "colonies".

Whether that is really true is open to debate. The Balearic and Canary Islands are in effect "counties" of Spain. They have the same status as Catalunya, Andalucía, and the others on the mainland, they elect MPs to the Spanish parliament, they have football teams in the Spanish leagues, and all the rest of it.

Therefore, one absolutely could argue that part of Spain - the part where I am right now, in fact - is geologically in Africa.

Britain has offshore possessions which work both ways. The Isle of Wight is a county, and is considered an integral part of England. But the Isle of Man isn't any more than the Falkland Islands are; it doesn't send an MP to Westminster, it has a Prime Minister (in Manx, Ard Shirveishagh) all of its own, and so on. Accordingly, the Isle of Man and the Falkland Islands are not integral parts of the United Kingdom.

So to Açores and Madeira. These two territories have the status of Regiões Autónomas, and the Republic of Portugal is considered to comprise Portugal Continental and its two Regiões Autónomas. They have their own parliaments and governments and have limited powers to make their own laws. On the other hand, they do also elect members to the Portuguese parliament in Lisbon. Then again, the Portuguese parliament also has members who represent Rest of the World; unlike in most countries, there are MPs who are solely elected by emigrants.

So you could argue either way as whether Açores and Madeira should be considered integral parts of Portugal or not. If you choose to argue that they are, does any other country lie on three continents. France?


Is it just me or does that give Madeira and the Azores roughly the same status as Scotland, Wales, and NI have in the UK?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1185701.  Tue Apr 05, 2016 5:44 pm Reply with quote

Comparable, certainly, so I don't have a problem with wishing to consider them as integral parts of Portugal.

971 Guadeloupe and 974 Réunion are considered to be integral parts of France - they are départements just as 62 Pas-de-Calais is a département.

So if Portugal is "in" Europe, Africa, and North America, then so is France.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1185725.  Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:55 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
So is Robben Island overseas, too? After all you do need to cross a bit of the Atlantic from Cape Town to get there.

As in, I think we need to talk definitions here.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Robben Island is less than 10km from the coast. Madeira is over 1000km from Portugal and the Azores are over 1500km, so I'm not sure your comparison is all that valid.

 
14-11-2014
1185763.  Wed Apr 06, 2016 4:28 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Recently discovered that Portugal appears to be the only tri-continental country.

Since 2010, from a geological point of view, the Netherlands can be found in North America (Saba, Sint Eustatius), South America (Bonaire) and Europe.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1185768.  Wed Apr 06, 2016 4:35 am Reply with quote

I think this is the point at which to bring Iceland into the debate. It might only be on two continents, but to my knowledge it's the only country on earth that is on two different continents with one continuous landmass.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
'yorz
1185769.  Wed Apr 06, 2016 4:37 am Reply with quote

I'll never get used to the Netherlands being treated as singular. The United Stated are, and so are the Netherlands. I know, it's a different thing, but still.... Old age, no doubt.

 

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