View previous topic | View next topic

Islands - Isles - Islets

Page 1 of 10
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next

Hans Mof
725559.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 5:16 pm Reply with quote

To start us off:

Ernst-Thälmann- Insel
post 151551

Heligoland
post 638336

More to come...
In the mean time: Is there any sunken island where, according to local legend, you can't hear bells toll?

 
Spud McLaren
725562.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 5:35 pm Reply with quote

Tory Island has its own king, who was visited by Tony Hawks, as recorded in Round Ireland With A Fridge.

The Isle of Man is not part of the United Kingdom but its foreign relations, defence, and ultimate good governance are the responsibility of the Government of the United Kingdom.

 
Spud McLaren
725565.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 5:43 pm Reply with quote

Wiki wrote:
Tynwald, the [Manx} parliament, was nominally founded in AD 979. It is arguably the oldest continuous parliament in the world.


However,

Wiki wrote:
Iceland is a representative democracy and a parliamentary republic. The modern parliament, Alþingi (English: Althing), was founded in 1845 as an advisory body to the Danish monarch. It was widely seen as a re-establishment of the assembly founded in 930 in the Commonwealth period and suspended in 1799. Consequently, it is arguably the world's oldest parliamentary democracy.

 
bemahan
725569.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:00 pm Reply with quote

Islets always makes me think of Islets of Langerhans. Not geographical but QI all the same.

Could be used to confuse or to elicit a klaxon for someone.

 
Spud McLaren
725570.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:05 pm Reply with quote

QI and misleading.

Good post, bem!

 
bemahan
725571.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:08 pm Reply with quote

Not sure how misleading though. I've heard of them due to medical training so it's difficult for me to gauge how well-known, or not, they are.

 
'yorz
725574.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:17 pm Reply with quote

Hans Mof wrote:
Is there any sunken island where, according to local legend, you can't hear bells toll?


You're sure about the can't, Hans?

 
Spud McLaren
725575.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:21 pm Reply with quote

Bem, I think if you asked most non-medical bods where the Islets of Langerhans were, you'd get an answer that centred on the Straits of Denmark, or similar.

In fact - buggrit, can't get a map link to work properly - the West Frisian Islands would be a good candidate.

Wiki'll have to do.

Or the East Frisian Islands

This chain of islands is in itself QI. Take a look, including some of the further links.

F'rinstance, Texel is famous in military history as the only place that a navy was defeated on horseback. Occupying Holland in January 1795, the French continental army learned that the mighty Dutch navy had been frozen into the ice around Texel Island, so Commandant Louis Joseph Lahure and 128 men simply rode up to it and demanded surrender. No shots were fired. {ta, Wiki}

 
Hans Mof
725580.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 7:08 pm Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
Hans Mof wrote:
Is there any sunken island where, according to local legend, you can't hear bells toll?


You're sure about the can't, Hans?


Erm, ...
yes?

It's meant as a rhetorical question. All stories of sunken cities/islands have bells tolling.

 
Hans Mof
725581.  Sat Jul 03, 2010 7:20 pm Reply with quote

Urk, a Dutch Municipality, is pretty much the contrary to a sunken island. That is to say, it has been engulfed by land. While the Noordoostpolder is interesting Urk is quite interesting for non-geographical reasons.

Politics/Religion

These two do indeed go hand in hand. In national elections about 90% of Urk votes go to Christian Parties (CDA, CU, SGP) while the PvdA (Dutch equivalent to Labour) just about reaches 1% (in words: one percent). It shouldn't come as a surprise that they don't even bother to run for municipal elections. Orthodox Protestantism also explains the highest birth rate in the Netherlands (3.23 children/woman).

Local Folklore

While vreemden (strangers) are born from cabbage, Urkers come from a rock 30 metres off the shore – the Ommelebommelestien. When a baby is expected the mother is kept in bed with a nail through her right foot while the father rows to Schokland (even though Schokland and Urk are now connected by land he still has to row) to get a key and then to the Ommelebommelestien. Here he has to find a door under water, pay a fee (1 Guilder for a girl, 2 Guilder for a boy) and collect the baby.

Science

Given their peculiarities Urkers have been the butt of many a joke and even scientific interest – being regarded as retarded and incapable of living outside the island. Even the notion Urkers being the Ur-Holland race has been purported. This led to studies including measuring skull circumferences. To this end Urk cemeteries were robbed. To this day several of these skulls are held by Dutch and German universities.

 
Hans Mof
725677.  Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:06 pm Reply with quote

Back to the Frisian Islands.

Question: Why is a good idea to escape to the attic during a storm flood?
Klaxon: As not to get wet feet.

To escape storm floods Drifthäuser (German), Drifthuusen (Frisian) (drifting houses) were build. The roof was constructed onto a stable, float-like floor. The inhabitants could take refuge here with all their belongings and livestock. When the water kept rising, they'd knock out some bolts connecting the roof to the main building. Now they only had to wait for the water to wear down the clay walls for the raft to sail to the main land. The roof, aligned north-western, functioning as a sail.

This construction can be found in the Spiekeroog "Old Island Church".


 
'yorz
725681.  Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:36 pm Reply with quote

Us Dutchies are such cleverclogs.

 
Alfred E Neuman
725682.  Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:43 pm Reply with quote

bemahan wrote:
Not sure how misleading though. I've heard of them due to medical training so it's difficult for me to gauge how well-known, or not, they are.


I've heard of them, from high school biology lessons 30 odd years ago. I had to check to see which organs they were in, but I knew they weren't geographical.

 
djgordy
725777.  Mon Jul 05, 2010 3:32 am Reply with quote

No man is an island entire of itself; every man
is a piece of the continent, a part of the main;
if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe
is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as
well as any manner of thy friends or of thine
own were; any man's death diminishes me,
because I am involved in mankind.
And therefore never send to know for whom
the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.

John Donne
Devotions upon emergent occasions and seuerall steps in my sicknes - Meditation XVII, 1624:

 
Jenny
725881.  Mon Jul 05, 2010 10:41 am Reply with quote

This would be a good thread to mention Mount Desert Island, home to Acadia National Park in Maine and one of the most beautiful places in the world, IMO. I wonder if the name is unique in containing not one but three geographic features?

 

Page 1 of 10
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group