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Islands - Isles - Islets

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Spud McLaren
728516.  Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:22 pm Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
Largest lake on an island in a lake on an island...Crater Lake on Vulcano Island in Lake Taal on Luzon (PHI)
Or there's the arrangement on Isle Royale, L Superior, about which Wiki says (amongst other QI snippets such as Native American copper mining), "Siskiwit Lake, largest lake on the island; cold, deep, clear, and relatively low in nutrients. Siskiwit Lake contains several islands, including Ryan Island, the largest therein, which itself contains Moose Flats, a seasonal pond, which contains Moose Boulder. When Moose Flats is a pond, Moose Boulder becomes the largest island in the largest lake on the largest island in the largest lake on the largest island in the largest lake in the world."

 
Spud McLaren
728518.  Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:27 pm Reply with quote

"The road encircling Mackinac Island and closely hugging the shoreline is M-185, the United States' only state highway without motorized vehicles." - Wiki.

 
'yorz
729466.  Fri Jul 23, 2010 1:01 pm Reply with quote

And I found the Phantom Emerald Island!

Quote:
The Emerald Island is a phantom island reported by some early explorers[who?] to lie between Australia and Antarctica and south of Macquarie Island. Sightings were made, for example, by the ship Emerald in December 1821, and the name of the presumed island derives from the name of this ship. It was supposed to be a small (but high or mountainous) island at 57°30′S 162°0′E / 57.5°S 162°E / -57.5; 162.

No trace of the island was found by the 1840 United States Exploring Expedition,[1] and a search by the Nimrod in 1909 turned up nothing.[2] Nevertheless, it appeared on a map as late as 1987 in a desk calendar book (with atlas) published by American Express.

The abyssal plain on the ocean floor beneath the supposed location of this phantom island is named Emerald Basin.


And suffered a Youlgreave, reading abysmal in stead of abyssal


Last edited by 'yorz on Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:26 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
thedrew
730153.  Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:25 am Reply with quote

The island of Puerto Rico is named after the capital city that is named for the island

Though originally named Borinquen by the Taino people, Christopher Columbus named the Island San Juan Bautista (St. John the Baptist). In 1521 the colony of Ciudad de Puerto Rico (Good/Rich Port City) was founded. Over the subsequent 200 years ambiguous use of San Juan Bautista (often shortened to San Juan) and Puerto Rico by both residents and sailors let to the names switching by 1746 with the city having the common name for an island (i.e. a Saint) and the island being named for a particular port.

If you ask the average American what the oldest city in the US is, he'll probably say Plymouth (1620). A few clever people will remember Jamestown (1607) from their US History books. Still others may think of St. Augustine, Florida (1565). However, while the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is not a State it is IN the United States, so San Juan (1521) is the oldest city in the United States.

 
suze
730184.  Tue Jul 27, 2010 3:40 pm Reply with quote

Howsabout Old Oraibi, a Hopi settlement in Arizona? Conventionally dated to 1100, and permanently inhabited ever since.

The Hopi Nation doesn't allow photography or census counting at Old Oraibi, but the population is believed to be around 1,000 - so it is a place of some small significance.

 
thedrew
730285.  Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:43 am Reply with quote

That is interesting. Though come to think of it, Honolulu or Hilo are probably as old. And Honolulu certainly would qualify as a city.

Though if Puerto Rico can change its name to San Juan and still lay claim to being the oldest city, certainly my hometown could having once been the Chumash village of Hilo'.

Hilo' was on an island in a lagoon (to get back on topic) this island was destroyed and much of the lagoon filled in 1942 to create a US Marine Corps Air Station. Goleta, California was the last place to be attacked by a foreign government - having been shelled by a Japanese submarine earlier that year (http://articles.sfgate.com/2009-02-24/bay-area/17187986_1_japanese-oil-submarine).

A some published works claim the captain of the submarine was motivated by revenge because he slipped and fell on a cactus and some oil rig workers laughed at him sometime in the 1930s. Either way he was familiar with the Santa Barbara Channel Islands and used them to avoid detection.

 
CB27
730394.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 7:37 am Reply with quote

I'd like to nominate the the island of Elleore, which despite bing within the territory of Denmark is recognised by some as the Kingdom of Elleore.

It's history is intriguing because of the way both the distant past and recent history have intertwined.

The following is from Simon Sellars, who has done much to promote several micronations, among several subjects he's written about:

Quote:
In 6th-century Ireland, Saint Fintan of Doon founded Clonenagh Monastery. When Fintan died in 603, the monastery continued to operate under his guiding principles. In the 10th century, after persistent harassment from the Roman church, Clonenagh’s monks were forced to make their lives elsewhere.

They initially sailed to the Isle of Man before settling on Amitsoq, a tiny island off Greenland’s south coast. But the harsh conditions took their toll and many died during the severe Amitsoq winters. The last of the party then sailed south, before extreme weather forced them east – to the Roskilde inlet.

They landed on Elleore on 17 February 944 and immediately fell in love, as the island’s landscape reminded them of Ireland in miniature form. One monk declared ‘Hic est elie ore!’ (’Here is the golden island’), and the name ‘Elleore’ was subsequently coined from ‘elie ore’ (’golden island’).

The exiles set about building a new monastery, Krune, which was inhabited for a further 600 years. There were more than a few notable monks on Elleore during this time, including the enigmatic Caius (1485–1510), an alchemist and practitioner of black magic who could apparently conjure up storms.

Around the time of the Reformation, the Danes viewed this separate monastic society of Irish renegades with extreme suspicion, eventually attacking the island and burning the monastery down. Surveying the ruins, Oscar, Elleore’s last abbot, said that the Kingdom would again rise from the ashes, some time in the distant future…

Until then, the surviving monks and nuns had no choice but to go to Denmark and marry into the Danish race.

Fast forward to 1834, when the Danish historian Frederik Barfod helped to found a progressive school for young boys. At this school the teaching was free and the program subsequently proved to be very successful, so much so that in 1938 the school’s language teachers formed a society, Societas Findani, devoted to preservation of the school’s underlying philosophy. The society was named after none other than Saint Fintan, who also taught free of charge.

The Findani founders, who came to be known as ‘the Immortals’, grew their goals far beyond a mere secret society – they yearned to form a separatist Findanian State. The first step was to find land, which they did, in the form of the uninhabited island of Elleore.

In 1944 the Immortals bought Elleore from the Danish government and the Kingdom of Elleore was born. Amazingly the Immortals had no prior knowledge of Elleore’s settlement by the disciples of Saint Fintan. It was only later when they began to research Elleore’s history that they found it was inextricably linked to their sacred saint – Fintan himself.

Like the monks before them, they’d inadvertently found their ‘Golden Island’ and in 1946 they set about building the castle Braadeborg. However, in yet another very vivid echo of the past, this was destroyed in 1958 by ‘foreign invaders’; the people, disillusioned, once again left the island to return to Denmark.

In 1964 a revival of interest ensured a return to Elleore and in 1975 the government purchased a 45-sq-m tent from a Swedish army depot and anointed it as the City Hall of Maglelille.

Now, every year, the big tent hosts Elleorian Week and the Kingdom is alive once again with eccentric people baring their teeth and curling their hands like fangs in imitation of the Lion that Ole shot, all those years ago..

 
thedrew
730436.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 11:26 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
'yorz wrote:
Largest lake on an island in a lake on an island...Crater Lake on Vulcano Island in Lake Taal on Luzon (PHI)
Or there's the arrangement on Isle Royale, L Superior, about which Wiki says (amongst other QI snippets such as Native American copper mining), "Siskiwit Lake, largest lake on the island; cold, deep, clear, and relatively low in nutrients. Siskiwit Lake contains several islands, including Ryan Island, the largest therein, which itself contains Moose Flats, a seasonal pond, which contains Moose Boulder. When Moose Flats is a pond, Moose Boulder becomes the largest island in the largest lake on the largest island in the largest lake on the largest island in the largest lake in the world."


A QI point about Isle Royale is that the Treaty of Paris (1783) that ended the American Revolution stated that the boundary between British Canada and the new United States would travel "through Lake Superior northward of the Isles Royal and Phelipeaux to the Long Lake."

Neither Isle Phelipeaux nor the Long Lake actually exist. Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isles_Phelipeaux_and_Pontchartrain

This was settled 50 years later in the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, which bizarrely established both Elm Point, MN and Northwest Angle, MN which are islands of a sort as they are parts of Minnesota only accessable by land through Canada.

 
suze
730449.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 11:57 am Reply with quote

Elm Point is uninhabited, but a few hundred people live in the Northwest Angle. The white minority expressed an interest in seceding to Canada a decade or so ago (and, oddly, their Congressman supported them), but the Red Lake Band - a majority of the local populace - thought otherwise, and the idea went no further.

There are a couple of other places in the USA which are accessible only from Canada. Hyder, Alaska is one - it is two miles from the border, and is connected only to the Canadian highway system. In Hyder, the currency is the Canadian dollar, US law is enforced by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (although Alaskan State Troopers are flown in for serious crimes), and kids go to school in Canada. (Alaska pays the salary of one teacher at the school just over the border in Stewart BC; that teacher teaches US History, which is not on Canadian syllabuses.)

If Hyder ever expressed a wish to secede to Canada, the response of the US government would probably be "yes please".

Then there is Point Roberts, Washington, which is on a peninsula about twenty miles south of Vancouver. At Point Roberts, they do have a proper border crossing with customs inspections (at the Northwest Angle and Hyder, they don't), and they do have American facilities. There is only a school up to second grade though - older kids are bussed to Blaine, Washington, 45 minutes away.

Point Roberts has no wish to secede, and prides itself on not needing Canadian help. (Except for fires. They don't tell the fire truck from Tsawwassen BC to go away if they have a fire.)

 
Jenny
730460.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 12:45 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
I'd like to nominate the the island of Elleore, which despite bing within the territory of Denmark is recognised by some as the Kingdom of Elleore.



I have two Danish friends who go there with their children every year.

 
thedrew
730511.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 4:10 pm Reply with quote

Excellent, Suze.

There's also Alburgh, Vermont, but it's connected by bridges to New York and mainland Vermont.

My favorite US/Canada border oddity has to be the Pig War. It led to the regular hoisting of the Union Flag by US Park Rangers at the British Camp on the island, one of the few places where US officers regularly fly a foreign flag.

 
suze
730530.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 5:27 pm Reply with quote

There's another rather odd one on the Québec - Maine border. The border at that point is defined by a road, and there are three houses and a French-speaking gas station on the American side of the road (Estcourt Station, Maine, population 4). The general public can access these only from Canada, although there are private roads off the American side which run into logging forest.

There is a customs post which must be cleared before Canadians may use the gas station, but the customs post is only open in the mornings and in practice most people don't bother with it. In 2002 the Americans arrested and imprisoned a Canadian for daring to visit the gas station without clearing customs first. That caused a bit of a diplomatic incident, and although the Americans refused to apologize, they haven't arrested anyone else.

Much as I quite like breaking rules, I probably won't try that. I've been to Point Roberts three or four times in my life - mainly out of curiosity value, there isn't actually much there - but I probably won't repeat what I once did when I was young and foolish, and walk into the USA and back along the beach. (It used to be quite a common student stunt. US border guards rarely patrolled the beach, and even if they did they pretended not to notice unless you were drunk. In which case, all that happened was that you were told to bugger off back into Canada. It's not like that any more, although as far as I know there is still no physical barrier on the beach.)

 
Woodsman
730578.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 10:00 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
daring to visit the gas station


The guy was doing what he and others always did without a dare. After 2001, the jobsworths thought they would get promoted by capturing an obvious threat - the guy trying to buy gas. It was a pretty shameful affair that the politicos had to spend time straightening out.

The people around Derby Line, VT need to be careful too. They walk from their living rooms to their bedrooms, crossing the border, on a daily basis without going through customs. It must drive the border guards nuts.

 
Woodsman
730585.  Thu Jul 29, 2010 10:29 pm Reply with quote

In nomination,

# Basket Island
# Clapboard Island
# Cow Island
# Crab Island
# Crow Island
# Eagle Island
# House Island
# Irony Island
# Little Bustins Island
# Lower Goose Island
# Pound of Tea
# Sow and Pigs
# The Brothers
# The Goslings
# The Nubbin

All situated in Casco Bay,Maine

 
suze
730654.  Fri Jul 30, 2010 11:04 am Reply with quote

Woodsman wrote:
The people around Derby Line, VT need to be careful too. They walk from their living rooms to their bedrooms, crossing the border, on a daily basis without going through customs. It must drive the border guards nuts.


Ooh, now that one I didn't know about. It seems that Derby Line VT (which is called Stanstead QC the other side of the street) has a bi-national public library; most of the building is in Canada, but the front door is in the USA. And the US authorities want to conduct customs inspections of everyone who crosses the street to go borrow a book.

In Europe, that sort of silliness - where it once existed - has largely been swept away in the last couple of decades. I know I've walked from France into Switzerland without seeing any evidence that I'd crossed a border, and even on the main roads the border is often marked only by flags. (Some border posts remain, some have just been abandoned and are slowly falling down, and some have been dismantled.)

Sadly, Britain and the USA seem bent on moving in the opposite direction.

 

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