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Spud McLaren
719278.  Sun Jun 13, 2010 8:41 pm Reply with quote

Not for the usual religious sniping, but for any QI info that can be found about Islam.


The Quran states that creating sects in Islam is Haram (forbidden), in Surah 30 Verse 32. However...(currently trying to find out how many sects are known to exist)

 
bobwilson
719279.  Sun Jun 13, 2010 8:55 pm Reply with quote

"Not creating a sect" is a bit of a non-starter really isn't it? The only possible way to avoid that is to have a clear set of instructions on who is the ultimate arbiter. Otherwise you just end up with "we're not creating a sect - they are".

Not that it matters much - since it's ordered by God and since God doesn't exist - not important.

 
Ian Dunn
719315.  Mon Jun 14, 2010 2:22 am Reply with quote

In Islam, it is believed that the colour blue protects against the evil eye.

Before anyone says, this has nothing to do with Sauron or Mordor.


Last edited by Ian Dunn on Tue Aug 24, 2010 2:16 am; edited 1 time in total

 
hassan el kebir
719359.  Mon Jun 14, 2010 5:15 am Reply with quote

The number of Islamic sects is....

http://www.central-mosque.com/fiqh/sectr1.htm

or then again, it might be....

http://contenderministries.org/islam/divisions.php

Good old Wiki has quite a few interesting things to say about Islam too

 
Ion Zone
719601.  Mon Jun 14, 2010 3:54 pm Reply with quote

Please keep to facts Bob, we've had way to many sniping threads.

http://www.islam101.com/dawah/pillars.html

 
bobwilson
719676.  Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:51 pm Reply with quote

Ion Zone wrote:
Please keep to facts Bob, we've had way to many sniping threads.

http://www.islam101.com/dawah/pillars.html


And your point is?

Those are the pillars according to that website. I could (but won't) point you to numerous other sources that would dispute that those are the pillars of Islam (or rather - that that is a correct interpretation of the pillars).

I suggest we subject it to the ultimate arbritation - let's stick a couple of preachers in Wembley Stadium and see who gets struck by lightning first?

 
Zarafa
735909.  Mon Aug 23, 2010 4:05 pm Reply with quote

There's a great book addressing the issue of heterodoxy titled "Imaginal Worlds: Ibn al'Arabi and the Problem of Religious Diversity", translated, edited and introduced by William C. Chittick.

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Q67dJUby5NAC&printsec=frontcover&dq=imaginal+worlds&source=bl&ots=V2XqHZvfUz&sig=Xpcs94K2uYTO9uVd4sOh_v6MtuQ&hl=en&ei=jt9yTM-TJIm6jAeMtcD7CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBUQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

I shall be very disappointed if the word "Imaginal" doesn't make it into this series.

While I'm on the topic of obscure Sufi books, "The Conference of the Birds" by Farid al-Din Attar is another good one. It involves a whole flock of birds (it ends up being thirty of them, as it happens) going on a quest to find a mythical creature called the Simurgh (which is Persian for 'thirtybirds'...bit of a hint there...) They go through a variety of adventures and either hear or experience a number of allegorical stories that represent Sufi teachings until they achieve spiritual fulfillment.


http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=yY0M7e8Og0QC&printsec=frontcover&dq=the+conference+of+the+birds&source=bl&ots=nklJLFAWsn&sig=OhWIKOrtq7xerRBh9bZgnVS1-YU&hl=en&ei=dOFyTO--OJi8jAf27ZH6CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false

 
Zarafa
735916.  Mon Aug 23, 2010 4:17 pm Reply with quote

post 676314

Another obscure and mystical Sufi story that I've quoted on these forums in the past...

 
Efros
735921.  Mon Aug 23, 2010 4:30 pm Reply with quote

Zarafa wrote:
I shall be very disappointed if the word "Imaginal" doesn't make it into this series.



thanks for that one Zarafa, learnt a new word today!

 
CB27
735943.  Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:16 pm Reply with quote

Though most people are aware of the Quran, Islam also has collections of narrations called Hadiths, which are used to help understand Muslim law and history.

Different sections of Islam have different sets of hadiths, and like some of my examples of commandments in another thread, some make you wonder why they were included:

In the Sahih Muslim, chapter II (Purification), no. 462 states "The Apostle of Allah (p.b.u.h) said. When any one of you awakes up from sleep and performs ablution, he must clean his nose three times, for the devil spends the night in the interior of his nose."

In the Sahih Bukhari, chapter XXI (Prayer at night), no. 245 states "A person was mentioned before the Prophet (p.b.u.h) and he was told that he had kept on sleeping till morning and had not got up for the prayer. The Prophet said, "Satan urinated in his ears.""

And this one boggles me, in Imam Malik's Muwatta, chapter XLIX (The description of the prophet (p.b.u.h)), no. 10 states "Yahya related to me from Malik from Suhayl ibn Abi Salih from his father from Abu Hurayra that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, gave hospitality to a kafir guest. The Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, ordered a sheep to be brought for him and it was milked. He drank its milk. Then another came, and he drank it. Then another came and he drank it until he had drunk the milk of seven sheep. In the morning he became muslim, and the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, ordered a sheep for him. It was milked and he drank its milk. Then he ordered another for him and he could not finish it. The Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, "The mumin drinks in one intestine, and the kafir drinks in seven intestines.""

 
Zarafa
735945.  Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:19 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
In the Sahih Muslim, chapter II (Purification), no. 462 states "The Apostle of Allah (p.b.u.h) said. When any one of you awakes up from sleep and performs ablution, he must clean his nose three times, for the devil spends the night in the interior of his nose."


Apparently they all spent the night on the Tube, then...

 
Zarafa
735960.  Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:37 pm Reply with quote

How about the fascinating creature, the buraq? Known for transporting the prophets, including Muhammad, on journeys not possible on an ordinary steed.

Encyclopaedia of Islam has this to say about the appearance of the buraq:

Quote:
In one of the numerous ḥadīt̲h̲ s that Ṭabarī, in his Ḳurʾān commentary, gives on the “night journey”, Muḥammad's mount is described simply as a horse (xv, 6 f.). Most ḥadīt̲h̲s of the earlier times call it, however, al-Burāḳ and define it as “a beast (in size intermediate) between a mule and an ass”, sometimes with the further detail that it is white. It is also declared to be long (Muslim, Īmān , 259), with a long back and long ears ( Ibn Saʿd, i, I, 143), with shaking ears (Ṭabarī, Tafsīr , xv, 10), saddled and bridled (ibid., 12). The rad̲j̲az -poet ʿAd̲j̲d̲j̲ād̲j̲ (d. 97/715) speaks, in connexion with Abraham, of the “bridled Burāḳ” (ed. Ahlwardt, xxxv, 49-52: if genuine, the oldest datable evidence). The earlier Prophets have themselves made use of this beast (Ṭabarī, Tafsīr , xv, 10; Ibn His̲h̲ām, 263). Its speed is said, as a rule, to be such that “with one stride it moved as far as its gaze reached”. In Ibn His̲h̲ām, 264, in Ibn Saʿd, i, I, 143 and in Ṭabarī, Tafsīr , xv, 3 it is also described as a beast having “wings on its shanks, with which it drives forward its legs”. These words are intended to mean, of course, only that al-Burāḳ could move its legs extremely quickly, and not that it was capable of flying. Genuine wings are first ascribed to it only in later texts. It is generally depicted in miniatures as a winged creature (see below). Grammatically al-Burāḳ is construed both as masculine and as feminine.

(Paret, R. "al- Burāḳ." Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition. Edited by: P. Bearman; , Th. Bianquis; , C.E. Bosworth; , E. van Donzel; and W.P. Heinrichs. Brill, 2010. Brill Online. EXETER UNIVERSITY. 23 August 2010 <http://0-www.brillonline.nl.lib.exeter.ac.uk/subscriber/entry?entry=islam_SIM-1527>)


There are some lovely representations of the buraq on its wikipedia page.

 
RLDavies
736084.  Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:04 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
In Islam, it is believed that the colour blue protects against the evil eye.

Before anyone says, this has nothing to do with Sauron or Mordor.

I suspect this superstition predates Islam. Blue amulets are common all around the Mediterranean.

At a guess, it might come from the simple fact that bright, clear blue is rare in nature, except for the sky. So any object that can capture a little fragment of the heavenly realms must be pure good.

 
plinkplonk
740069.  Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:52 am Reply with quote

What is the name of the Islamic Angel of Death?

 
Efros
740074.  Mon Sep 06, 2010 6:02 am Reply with quote

Israel.

 

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