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Ion Zone
719983.  Tue Jun 15, 2010 5:48 pm Reply with quote

India is now really big on rock music, according to Radio Four.

 
Neotenic
719990.  Tue Jun 15, 2010 7:22 pm Reply with quote

Highway to Hyderabad?

Delhi Rock City?

Or do they prefer something a bit softer, like You Can't Curry Love?

 
Ian Dunn
720015.  Wed Jun 16, 2010 1:35 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Although Pakistan didn't exist until 1947, or Bangladesh until 1971. Dino Shafeek was born in 1929, and hence this occurred in India. I can't immediately discover when Babar Bhatti was born, but there's every chance that he too was born in India.


I suppose I should have said "what we now refer to as India".

 
Ian Dunn
756872.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 11:15 am Reply with quote

A protest has broken out in Delhi by hundreds of toilet cleaners. Interestingly, the toilets being cleaned are non-flush.

The BBC reports that there are 300,000 (or 1 million according to unofficial counts) Dalits - formerly knowns as the untouchables, who are on the lowest rung of the Hindu cast system, who do this work.

Despite the job being illegal, it is still carried out, including some government departments. The railways ministry uses them because most trains have open-discharge toilets and so human faeces lands on the tracks.

 
suze
756901.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 12:39 pm Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
The railways ministry uses them because most trains have open-discharge toilets and so human faeces lands on the tracks.


This rather distasteful practice is by no means confined to India.

Newer trains by now have tanks which retain the human waste until it can be properly disposed of (in the UK, this is done at the depot). These do have the disadvantage that once the tank is full, the toilet cannot be used further. Which is why the toilets have a tendency to be locked out of use late in the evening (when one is perhaps most likely to need them).

But older trains the world over send the waste matter out onto the tracks.

 
Woodsman
756967.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:35 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
This rather distasteful practice is by no means confined to India.


Yes, rather distasteful. But we had trains spewing 'it' along the tracks for decades onto what is essentially a linear septic disposal field similar to what we have in our back yard out in the countryside. The solids, ejected at speed, disintegrated on contact with the track structure and were washed into the gravel (or crushed rock) disposal field. The waste water did the same.

People in some places suddenly realized some years ago that this was going on and objected. I'm not sure anyone could point to anyone getting sick from the practice since the trackage is not to be trespassed upon for safety reasons. Only trespassers could potentially get in contact with anything distasteful. But direct dumping was outlawed anyway by a busybody government. Now we get sick from attempting to use an overflowing toilet.

When the train is in the station
Please refrain from urination
Have regard for railway property
If you really must pass water
Go and find a railway porter
He'll direct you to the lavat'ry


To the tune of Dvorak's Humoresque

 
mckeonj
756978.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 6:32 pm Reply with quote

Don't eat yellow snow or blue ice.

 
Woodsman
757001.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 8:11 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Don't eat yellow snow or blue ice.


Not currently in my diet.

 
Ian Dunn
757186.  Tue Nov 02, 2010 2:07 pm Reply with quote

Another India story from the BBC that seems interesting - the fall in the population wild owls in India is being blamed on Harry Potter.

Jairam Ramesh, the Minister for the Environment, claims that the books are making owls popular as pets and thus peopl try to buy them from illegal bird traders.

Another reason is that owls are sacrificed during important Hindu festivals. There are 30 species of owl in India.

 
Jenny
785285.  Mon Feb 07, 2011 5:09 pm Reply with quote

I was born in India!

 
annadevis
790916.  Fri Feb 25, 2011 2:02 am Reply with quote

India is famous and popular country in all over the world. Delhi is capital of India. There are many city and states available in india. In india there are many public transport like local bus, auto rickshaw, train. plain and so on.

 
plinkplonk
793208.  Fri Mar 04, 2011 12:01 pm Reply with quote

For the second most populous country in the world this thread seems rather short.

Old Ripley of Ripley's Believe it or Not! talks of a huge number of fakirs he saw in India, people piercing their bodies, whipping, getting teeth knocked out, people staring at the sun until they went blind, the list was endless...

 
CB27
793219.  Fri Mar 04, 2011 12:33 pm Reply with quote

I don't know if anyone's been watching the Human Planet on BBC (yet one more programme that makes the licence really worth it). In one of the episodes they highlighted the "living bridges" of Cherrapunji.

Cherrapunji is a place in India which used to be considered the wettest place on Earth, but I believe it's now ranked second or third. It holds the record for the most rainfall recorded in a year (1860-1861), when the rainfall for the year was more than 75 feet (nearly 23m for our French readers), and in July 1861 it recorded a monthly rainfall of nearly 31 feet (again, 9.3m for the French...).

Compare this to London, which can get wet at time, London averages less than 23 inches (59cm) of rain a YEAR.

Because of the swelling of rivers, bridges are hard to maintain, so a few centuries ago the locals worked out that they can use the upper roots of the Rubber Fig tree to entwine together and create bridges which are sustained by the trees themselves. It takes years to create these bridges, and some are thought to be over half a millenia old.

These bridges can be so strong the locals actually paved them with stones, and some can take as many as 50 people on them at the same time.

Here are some pictures, courtey of www.rootbridges.blogspot.com:





 
Leith
793498.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 6:42 pm Reply with quote

Fascinating, CB. I've never seen anything like those bridges before.

 
Ainee
793653.  Sun Mar 06, 2011 9:46 am Reply with quote

Leith wrote:
Fascinating, CB. I've never seen anything like those bridges before.


Seconded. Thank you for this, CB!

 

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