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General "I" topics - maybe interesting, maybe not.

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Spud McLaren
764652.  Fri Dec 03, 2010 11:58 am Reply with quote

Frances wrote:
Re ignition; explosions don't have to involve explosives.
?
Frances wrote:
Flour, or any sufficiently fine powder, can explode if diffused to the right [or wrong...] density in an atmosphere containing oxygen, and a spark applied.
Then surely, flour is an explosive under those conditions?

Which leads me to ask - is a substance we normally think of as an explosive still an explosive when stored under conditions rendering it stable (extreme low temperature, waterlogged, whatever)?

 
Arcane
773515.  Sun Jan 09, 2011 3:01 am Reply with quote

Iguanadon means: Iguana tooth.

Although it has been mentioned upthread, a few interesting facts about it.

The first iguanadon fossil was formally found in 1822, and was the second dinosaur ever named after the Megalosaur.

Early depictions of the Iguanadon had a horn on its nose. Later discoveries of more complete skeletons proved that the "horn" was actually a modified thumb.

It is likely that the Iguanadon spent most of its time as a biped but may have actually spent increasing time as a quadraped as it became older and heavier.

There is a large model of a Iguanadon at Crystal Palace, depicted as a quadrapedal thickset dinosaur with the infamous horn on its nose.

 
Jumper
774019.  Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:55 pm Reply with quote

Immigration.


There is a theory about immigration distinguished by 'Push and Pull'.

Push factors refer primarily to the motive for emigration from the country of origin, whereas the things that attract you to become an immigrant to a particular country are the pull factor.

For example, escape from poverty is considered a traditional push factor, the availability of jobs is the related pull factor.

When you look at the 'per-capita' rate of immigration, Canada apparently has the highest per capita net immigration rate in the world, which is interesting when compared with New Zealand where 23% of the population was born overseas.

 
suze
774025.  Mon Jan 10, 2011 8:31 pm Reply with quote

What is the big migration issue in New Zealand? Is it NZers moving to Australia? I discover that NZers are basically allowed to do that if they want to - only if they have serious criminal records do they need to go through extensive formalities to get the necessary visa.

I'm a bit puzzled though. As of the 2006 census, 20.4% of people legally resident in Canadians were foreign born, with the UK and China the two most frequent countries of birth. (For comparison, at the last census 7.5% of people legally resident in the UK were foreign born.)

As with all major nations, the figure is undoubtedly an undercount. Since Canada only has one land border it doesn't attract the numbers of illegal entrants that some other nations do, but there are reckoned to be about 100,000.

This doesn't include Americans who informally live north of the border for most of the time but maintain their legal residence the other side. TBH, no one is too bothered about them. I don't think anyone really believes the official figure that there are only 40 persons of Greenlandic birth living in Canada either; there are probably more than that in Iqaluit alone.

On this basis, the 23% figure for New Zealand is really quite a large figure. I dare say a lot of these are older British born immigrants; where else do people emigrate from to go to NZ?

As for that highest immigration rate, it depends what you mean. It's often stated as being Canada, but this only counts people who move to Canada with the intention of living there permanently. 81% of persons living in the United Arab Emirates are immigrants, most of them people from India and Pakistan who go there for a few years and then return.

 
bobwilson
774044.  Mon Jan 10, 2011 10:13 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
20.4% of people legally resident in Canadians were foreign born


Resident in Canadians? suze has been watching Alien methinks.

 
Arcane
774068.  Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:09 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Quote:
20.4% of people legally resident in Canadians were foreign born


Resident in Canadians? suze has been watching Alien methinks.


"Get away from her you bitch, eh!"

 
'yorz
774086.  Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:32 am Reply with quote

Initiation
From the silly to the sinister

 
Jumper
774119.  Tue Jan 11, 2011 5:56 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
What is the big migration issue in New Zealand? Is it NZers moving to Australia? I discover that NZers are basically allowed to do that if they want to - only if they have serious criminal records do they need to go through extensive formalities to get the necessary visa.



On this basis, the 23% figure for New Zealand is really quite a large figure. I dare say a lot of these are older British born immigrants; where else do people emigrate from to go to NZ?



As at 11.40pm Tue 11th Jan 2011 New Zealand had a resident population of 4,395,519
New Zealand's population is estimated to increase by one person every 9 minutes and 59 seconds.

This is based on the estimated resident population at 30 September 2010 and the following component settings. (Note: these settings are subject to change.)

* one birth every 8 minutes and 12 seconds
* one death every 18 minutes and 34 seconds
* a net migration gain of one New Zealand resident every 31 minutes and 21 seconds.

New Zealand's ethnic make-up has continued to change, according to 2006 Census
results.
• European remained the largest of the major ethnic groups, with 2,609,592 people (67.6
percent of the population) in 2006. The Māori ethnic group is the second largest, with
565,329 people (or 14.6 percent).
• Of the major ethnic groups, the Asian ethnic group grew the fastest between 2001 and
2006, increasing from 238,176 people in 2001 to reach 354,552 people in 2006 (an
increase of almost 50 percent).
• Those identifying with the Pacific peoples ethnic group had the second-largest increase
from the 2001 Census, up 14.7 percent to total 265,974 people.


The number and proportion of people who were born overseas and are now living in New Zealand has continued to increase. In 2006, 22.9 percent of people usually living in New Zealand (or 879,543 people) were born overseas, compared with 19.5 percent in 2001
and 17.5 percent in 1996.

It will be interesting to see how much these figures change when the Census is taken again later this year...

 
Spud McLaren
777028.  Tue Jan 18, 2011 2:59 pm Reply with quote

How about an episode on Indignity and Ignominy?

 
Jumper
777061.  Tue Jan 18, 2011 4:11 pm Reply with quote

Jumper wrote:

It will be interesting to see how much these figures change when the Census is taken again later this year...


Every five years Statistics New Zealand takes an official count of the population and dwellings in New Zealand. Statistics New Zealand will conduct the next Census of Population and Dwellings on Tuesday, 8 March 2011.

This year however, there is a campaign underfoot by people that are not happy with the question in this years census. The question causing the most controversy is the one asking if you are 'Male or Female'.

The argument is that it is not good enough having only male and female to pick from on the census; there should be a third choice.

“For people who are, for instance intersex, some trans people don’t want to fit into either boxes,” says campaigner Maddy Drew. “Some of them do want to fit in, but for those who don't…”

Nepal has just made the change, so come May Nepalese will have three choices.

Ms Drew says we should follow suit.

“My personal preference is for a freeform box; so for instance if you're ethnicity isn't there, you just write it in.”

Statistics New Zealand says it does acknowledge a third category exists but not in surveys like the census.

“That is "indeterminate sex" and it’s picked up in some admin data collections but not something that is practical to implement in a survey,” says Carol Slappendel of Statistics NZ.

Ms Drew has started a Facebook group about the issue, suggesting her supporters tick both male and female.

“The concern I have is that using the census as a protest could really have significant implications for the country,” Ms Slappendel says.

It is not the first time Kiwis have sent a tremor through the data collecting force; back in 2001 more than 53,000 people listed themselves as Jedi.

So far the "2 ticks 4 sex group" has 388 members on Facebook, including Sue Kedgley (a NZ Green Party MP).

 

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