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suze
726794.  Fri Jul 09, 2010 1:27 pm Reply with quote

I'd always assumed that the word geyser was the Icelandic for a hot spring. But it isn't - Geysir is the name of one particular hot spring in Iceland, and it is from there that we take the word.

The Icelandic for a geyser is in fact goshver (plural goshverir).

 
tetsabb
726799.  Fri Jul 09, 2010 1:41 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Sorry plinkplonk, I rather set up a heffalump trap there ...



Careful plinkplonk, suze loves her heffalump traps.
We've not seen the Dobbynge Sticke for a while, though.

 
Woodsman
732193.  Sat Aug 07, 2010 10:41 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
another expedition was led there by Thorfinn Karlsefni and his wife Gudrid Thorbjarnardottir, who explored as far as where New York stands today and spent three or four years trying to establish a settlement before they gave up the idea.


I wonder if we have some archaeological evidence for that ?

 
busk31
734814.  Thu Aug 19, 2010 10:34 am Reply with quote

Any thoughts on the deCODE gene map?

 
Spud McLaren
734854.  Thu Aug 19, 2010 2:47 pm Reply with quote

Woodsman wrote:
Quote:
another expedition was led there by Thorfinn Karlsefni and his wife Gudrid Thorbjarnardottir, who explored as far as where New York stands today and spent three or four years trying to establish a settlement before they gave up the idea.


I wonder if we have some archaeological evidence for that ?
Seems to be one of those "now thought to be" jobs...

 
plinkplonk
734890.  Thu Aug 19, 2010 5:34 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Sorry plinkplonk, I rather set up a heffalump trap there ...

The QI Elf side of my personality was kinda hoping that someone would present that as the answer, because it enables me to sound a great big KLAXON.

Eyjafjallajökull (EH-a-ved-lie-YUG-utl, or thereabouts) is in fact the name of the glacier which overlies the volcano. The Daily Telegraph of 19 April gave the name of the volcano itself as Eyjafyoll; other sources give it as Eyjafjöll.


Sorry, Suze, I haven't been on the thread. Surely the glacier used to overlie the volcano, how can you have a glacier near an erupting volcano?

 
Woodsman
736868.  Fri Aug 27, 2010 7:28 am Reply with quote

Quote:
how can you have a glacier near an erupting volcano?


Iceland is a wonderful place.

Seriously, in a long eruption cycle of an Icelandic volcano, snow caps build up on top of them and given enough time start compressing as ice caps and flowing as glaciers. Eyjafjallajökull did that, 600 feet thick in 190 +/- years, but melted out rather spectacularly from the rising heat of the beginning of the Eyjafjoll eruption. The ensuing jökulhlaups, glacial bursts or floods, are as dangerous as the volcano, releasing huge amounts of melt water in a very short amount of time.

 
Posital
736898.  Fri Aug 27, 2010 8:55 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
I think there's a good chance that the whole country is one big supervolcano.
Are you proposing a single magma chamber for everything Icelandic?

 
Zebra57
737086.  Fri Aug 27, 2010 7:24 pm Reply with quote

Spud wrote: "I think there's a good chance that the whole country is one big supervolcano." This is unlikely given that the Island straddles two tectonic plates.

Suze: Heffalumps in Iceland is a new one on me? Were they found trapped in the glaciers like the Siberian mammoth was found in perma-frost?

 
Starfish13
771805.  Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:02 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
The Icelandic for a geyser is in fact goshver (plural goshverir).
As in a 'gush' of water I suppose.

Iceland has its version of the Doomesday book, the Landnámabók, that details the settlement of the Norse into Iceland. However, the first settlers are reputed to be Irish/Scottish rather than Norse, the Papar. The name is thought to derive from the word for 'father'.

The toponyms Pap- and Papar- are seen throughout the North Atlantic, in Iceland, the Faroes, Shetland and Orkney, along with Vestman- (meaning literally 'West men', or Irish men).

 
soup
771807.  Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:09 pm Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:

The toponyms Pap- and Papar- are seen throughout the North Atlantic, in Iceland, the Faroes, Shetland and Orkney.


Im my flat in third year were two guys from Orkney they came from the island of Westray they used to describe people from Papa Westray as knuckle dragging simpletons who did things that must not be spoken of with sheep.

 
suze
771822.  Sun Jan 02, 2011 5:06 pm Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:
As in a 'gush' of water I suppose.


Points to Starfish! I'd never made that connexion, but absolutely so. The English verb to gush and the Icelandic goshver are indeed both derived from an Old Norse verb gusa.

 
Jenny
771867.  Sun Jan 02, 2011 8:44 pm Reply with quote

Any relation to anguish?

 
suze
771875.  Sun Jan 02, 2011 9:09 pm Reply with quote

No. Anguish is French from Latin and comes ultimately from the verb angere (= to strangle), whence also anger.

 

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