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louly63
699343.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:49 am Reply with quote

I was told that GOLF stood for Gentlemen Only Ladies forbidden originally - thats a lie then I suppose?

 
scottydog
699345.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:51 am Reply with quote

yes

 
Sadurian Mike
699351.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 5:42 am Reply with quote

Just about any acronym that is supposed to date before WWII is a lie, ANZAC is the obvious exception (that was WWI).

 
Bondee
699376.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 6:26 am Reply with quote

There's a possible source for the word in post 386651.

 
Persica
699414.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 7:29 am Reply with quote

Of golf The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology says simply, of unknown origin. The OED expands:

Quote:
Of obscure origin.
Commonly supposed to be an adoption of Du. kolf, kolv- (= G. kolbe, ON. kólfr, etc.), ‘club’, the name of the stick, club, or bat, used in several games of the nature of tennis, croquet, hockey, etc. But none of the Dutch games have been convincingly identified with golf, nor is it certain that kolf was ever used to denote the game as well as the implement, though the game was and is called kolven (the infinitive of the derived vb.). Additional difficulty is caused by the absence of any Scottish forms with initial c or k, and by the fact that golf is mentioned much earlier than any of the Dutch sports. Some mod. Sc. dialects have gowf ‘a blow with the open hand’, also vb. to strike.


and records the first use in 1457
Quote:
Sc. Acts Jas. II (1814) II. 48/2 And at e fut bal ande e golf be vtterly cryt downe and nocht vsyt.



The Pocket Fowler's Modern English Usage says of acronym that this term was first used in the 1940s. It continues ...

Quote:
In everyday use, acronym is sometimes applied to abbreviations that are properly initialisms, since they are pronounced as separate letters (e.g. EU = European Union, DVD = digital versatile disc).



So, strictu sensu, ANZAC is an initialism and not an exception to the "not before 1940s" rule.

P.

Edit: see correction below at post 699721.


Last edited by Persica on Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:28 pm; edited 4 times in total

 
samivel
699568.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 1:02 pm Reply with quote

Anzac isn't pronounced as separate letters though, therefore it is an acronym. Unless you pronounce it ay-en-zed-ay-see.

 
Posital
699590.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 2:13 pm Reply with quote

Yup. Where's me Anzac biscuits?

 
Sadurian Mike
699648.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:56 pm Reply with quote

Persica wrote:
So, strictu sensu, ANZAC is an initialism and not an exception to the "not before 1940s" rule.

I think you'll find that "ANZAC" is a good example of an acronym. It is a word, pronounced "an-zak", made up of initial letters.

It was also used before WWII (during WWI, in fact) although it may not have been termed an acronym at the time.

 
Persica
699721.  Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:27 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
So, strictu sensu, ANZAC is an initialism and not an exception to the "not before 1940s" rule.


What was I thinking? My mistake.

Helen Doyle's entry on "Anzac" in The Oxford Companion to Australian History says:

Quote:
was devised in 1915, reputedly by a New Zealand signaller, as a telegraphic code name for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, and adopted by General Birdwood. In April of that year he selected and named ‘Anzac Cove’ as the landing site on the Gallipoli Peninsula; the battle at Gallipoli subsequently became known as the Anzac campaign.


It was used as an acronym from early on it would seem.

P.

 
zomgmouse
699751.  Wed Apr 21, 2010 3:16 am Reply with quote

SCUBA.

 
Bondee
699787.  Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:03 am Reply with quote

laser

 
Persica
699917.  Wed Apr 21, 2010 8:27 am Reply with quote

zomgmouse wrote:
SCUBA.


No. The OED records first use as 1952:

Quote:
HAHN & LAMBERTSEN On using Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (U.S. Nat. Acad. Sci.) 1 Within the last 3-5 years we have witnessed..a rapid increase in the numbers of self contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) in use... SCUBA are now in relatively large scale use by spearfishermen and sports swimmers.


Mike's Rule still stands.

P.

 
Persica
699920.  Wed Apr 21, 2010 8:30 am Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:
laser


No.

If you meant the gum-resin mentioned by Roman writers obtained from an umbelliferous plant called serpcium or silphium, then this is not an acronym.

If you meant the optical maser, then the OED records the first use in 1960:

Quote:
1960 N.Y. Times 8 July 7/6 The Hughes device is an optical maser, or ‘laser’, (the ‘l’ standing for ‘light’). 1960 Aviation Week 18 July 97/2 The optical Maser is also referred to by the term Laser. 1960 Daily Tel. 29 Dec. 9/4 The laser, a device for amplifying light which could conceivably be developed to produce a searchlight beam that would reach the moon, is still a paper project as far as British scientists are concerned.


Mike's Rule still stands.

P.

 
Persica
699952.  Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:21 am Reply with quote

Does Gestapo count?

The OED records

Quote:
1934 New Republic 18 July 249/2 The names and significance of the..semi-military organizations in Germany..are:..The Geheime Staats Polizei, usually called the Gestapo, the secret state police of Prussia

and

Quote:
1937 N.Y. Times Mag. 21 Nov. 1/3 The spokesmen of the regime,..are taking every opportunity..to ridicule the idea that every German servant girl abroad is a disguised Gestapo agent or a spy.


P.

 
Persica
699953.  Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:23 am Reply with quote

Persica wrote:
What was I thinking? My mistake.


I guess I should have said:

SNAFU.

P.

 

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