View previous topic | View next topic

Who will succeed Jeremy Corbyn as Labour Leader?

Page 52 of 53
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 51, 52, 53  Next


Next Leader?
David Miliband
60%
 60%  [ 6 ]
Ed Miliband
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Ed Miliband
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
John McDonnell
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Ed Miliband
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Andrew Burnham
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Diane Abbott
40%
 40%  [ 4 ]
Total Votes : 10

Numerophile
1239286.  Fri Jun 09, 2017 12:17 pm Reply with quote

It was the largest increase between elections in the share of the vote since Atlee, not in the number of seats won.

 
Jenny
1239347.  Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:11 pm Reply with quote

I sit corrected - thanks Numerophile :-)

Particularly significant since it's only two years since the last election, IMHO.

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
1239482.  Mon Jun 12, 2017 2:21 pm Reply with quote

Corbyn surprisingly did well gaining 30 seats, before we thought he may be losing seats due to Brexit.

Labour still have a long way to go to be in a position to govern though. If Labour build on the performance and do better next time, they are in for a shout.

I still feel Corbyn must not take Labour too far to the left otherwise they won't win elections.

 
dr.bob
1239520.  Tue Jun 13, 2017 4:25 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
So Prof, after he has led them to gains across the country and (as of Friday morning) may yet take another Tory scalp in Kensington, you still think he is the wrong man for the job?


It's all a matter of perspective, innit?

In 2010, Gordon Brown won 258 seats and, despite being well behind in the polls, stopped the Tories having an overall majority forcing them into coalition with a minority party. Such a terrible failure lead to his immediate resignation.

In 2017, Jeremy Corbyn won 262 seats and, despite being well behind in the polls, stopped the Tories having an overall majority forcing them into coalition with a minority party. This is seen as a huge success and has bolstered his position within the party.

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
1239777.  Fri Jun 16, 2017 2:42 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
So Prof, after he has led them to gains across the country and (as of Friday morning) may yet take another Tory scalp in Kensington, you still think he is the wrong man for the job?

No offence intended or implied, you should know by now it doesn't matter a pile of foetid dingo's kidneys to me either way.


I stand corrected. We can all agree Corbyn will need to do a lot more to make the Labour party a party people can trust to govern.

 
dr.bob
1239975.  Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:57 am Reply with quote

Interesting point made by Ed Balls on The Last Leg at the weekend. He admitted that Corbyn ran a very good campaign and he should be applauded for that.

However, he also drew attention to the fact that he was standing against Theresa May who is widely agreed to have run possibly the worst election campaign in decades, yet he still got fewer votes than her. Any feelings of optimism about Labour's performance have to be slightly tempered by the worry that things would be very different if the Tories had a capable leader running an effective campaign.

 
PDR
1239976.  Mon Jun 19, 2017 8:30 am Reply with quote

Indeed. Several people have observed that, if viewed dispassionately, his actual achievement is to have failed to score when shooting from the penalty spot against a team which has received 11 red cards.

Another observation would be that if we send our uniformed servicemen and women into battle to defend our nation's interests without adequate weapons and equipment there is an explosion of outrage at the evil government that did this.

But today we are sending our men and women into battle to defend the nation's interests and they are not only completely unarmed - they are stark naked and directed to advance toward the enemy butt-first shouting "take me, big boy!" by generals who mainly just grandstand on television and repeat the same old (long since refuted) claims and slogans.

I can't help but feel that one day there will have be a reconning in which these deplorable people are held to account.

PDR

 
djgordy
1239993.  Mon Jun 19, 2017 10:22 am Reply with quote

Quite. I have made no secret of the fact that I find Corbyn to be entirely useless, stupid and hypocritical. This idea that people are putting around that he won the election despite clearly losing it is simply laughable. People have criticized the PLP for not getting behind him from the start but it seems the PLP were right to begin with. Those people have worked with Corbyn for years and simply to dismiss their assessment of him is perverse.

To be honest though, I reckon the problem really stems from the fact that they picked the wrong Miliband brother back in whatever year it was.

 
PDR
1240120.  Tue Jun 20, 2017 6:51 pm Reply with quote

Well while the smiling face of the election campaign fades, the former spirit of the Corbynistas reasserts itself in purges.


It is said so manly under 35 voted for Labour because they never experienced the "Winter of Discontent". Well they are about to suffer their own season of discontent.

Unite official who lost to Len McCluskey in leadership race 'sacked'

Quote:
A senior Unite official who lost a close battle with Len McCluskey to lead Britain’s biggest union has been sacked.

Gerard Coyne, who was the union’s West Midlands regional organiser, was told that he must leave after 28 years for the misuse of data. He lost out in the April election by fewer than 6,000 votes after challenging McCluskey’s leadership. The union election was described as a battle for the heart and soul of the Labour party, which Unite bankrolls with £1.5m a year.

McCluskey, one of Jeremy Corbyn’s key allies and leader of the organisation that is Labour’s most generous donor, has called for the deselection of MPs who fail to back Labour’s leader. Coyne was backed by many MPs unhappy with Corbyn’s leadership.

The investigation into Coyne was led by Andrew Murray, Unite’s chief of staff who was seconded to the Corbyn campaign during the general election, it is understood. Coyne was found guilty of using Labour party data and a call centre used by the party’s West Midlands mayoral candidate, Siôn Simon, to contact potential supporters.

During the campaign, McCluskey’s supporters were angered by Coyne’s claim that McCluskey had behaved like a 1970s “union baron”, throwing his weight around in Westminster, making and breaking political careers. Following the Guardian disclosure that Unite gave a “loan” to McCluskey of £400,000 for a flat, Coyne promised to review payments made for the benefit of union officials.

The incumbent McCluskey, 66, defeated Coyne after a bitter month-long campaign that culminated in Coyne’s suspension from his union role 24 hours before the vote declaration.......

Documents show that alleged rule breaches include allowing McCluskey to use databases while stopping Coyne from doing the same during the campaign to become general secretary; union employees actively seeking to prevent Coyne raising the question as to whether union resources were improperly used to assist with the purchase of a luxury flat; and repeated harassment of Coyne and his supporters by union employees.

Coyne said he was tried by a “kangaroo court” and despaired that he was tried by Murray, a former Communist party member. “I am deeply disappointed but not surprised at my dismissal. When you are in a kangaroo court, you are rarely surprised by the outcome. I have held the post for 16 years and no complaint was raised during the hearing about how I carried out that role. However, during the disciplinary process I was informed that union rules require a regional secretary to be ‘the general secretary’s representative in the region’. It was implied that because of the way I criticised Len McCluskey during the campaign I could not fulfil that role any longer,” he said.

Coyne said: “The disciplinary hearing was nothing more than a show trial and the irony is not lost on me that Mr McCluskey’s chief of staff, Andrew Murray – a self-confessed admirer of Joseph Stalin – was the investigator and decision-maker on the charge I was dismissed for. It is beyond parody that I, as a 30-year member of the Labour party, should be accused of harming Unite-Labour relations by Mr Murray, a member of the Communist party for 40 years.”

Coyne said he would appeal against the union’s decision and pursue a complaint to the certification officer in the hope the election could be rerun. “I will not be bullied into silence. Once the certification officer has considered my complaint about the conduct of the election, I am looking forward to a re-run of the contest. We will build a union where members’ interests are always put first – not subordinated to the political machinations of a clique. I will be appealing against the decision.”

A Unite spokesman said: “The decision is subject to a right of appeal to Unite’s executive council, and the union will be offering no further comment on the matter.”


As Blair said:
"And they looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which."

PDR

 
barbados
1240132.  Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:17 am Reply with quote

Isn't Corbyn an honourable man of the people though? You know the type - not cynical in any way, not like the other self serving bunch of weasels (except of John McDonnell of course, he's the same type as Corbyn)

 
barbados
1249080.  Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:01 pm Reply with quote

Well, I'd suggest that the opposition day motions this week have shown Corbyn up as the naive clueless leader that he is. There was an opportunity for him to put the government under some real pressure, but he failed miserably.

 
GuyBarry
1249162.  Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:21 pm Reply with quote

barbados wrote:
Well, I'd suggest that the opposition day motions this week have shown Corbyn up as the naive clueless leader that he is. There was an opportunity for him to put the government under some real pressure, but he failed miserably.


What, you mean the ones in favour of increasing NHS pay and against a rise in tuition fees, both of which passed without going to a vote? Neither is binding, but it shows the precarious position of this minority government. The deal with the DUP doesn't cover anything apart from confidence motions, the budget and Brexit. Any motion supported by all the opposition parties will pass. I foresee a lot of trouble for the government ahead.

 
barbados
1249163.  Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:28 pm Reply with quote

Yes - however had there been some dissent initially from his backbenchers, then there would have been a vote - which the government would lose, even with a three line whip where the whips actually do the voting themselves, because the DUP confirmed they would, as per their agreement, to vote with the Labour Party
It was a missed opportunity to give the government a bloody nose - which as leader of the opposition - is his job after all

 
GuyBarry
1249166.  Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:33 pm Reply with quote

barbados wrote:
Yes - however had there been some dissent initially from his backbenchers, then there would have been a vote - which the government would lose, even with a three line whip where the whips actually do the voting themselves, because the DUP confirmed they would, as per their agreement, to vote with the Labour Party
It was a missed opportunity to give the government a bloody nose - which as leader of the opposition - is his job after all


But he did. The motions passed without a vote. How did he miss his opportunity?

 
barbados
1249167.  Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:35 pm Reply with quote

Did the government lose an - albeit meaningless - vote?

 

Page 52 of 53
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 51, 52, 53  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group