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Who will succeed Jeremy Corbyn as Labour Leader?

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Next Leader?
David Miliband
60%
 60%  [ 6 ]
Ed Miliband
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Ed Miliband
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
John McDonnell
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Ed Miliband
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Andrew Burnham
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Diane Abbott
40%
 40%  [ 4 ]
Total Votes : 10

Prof Wind Up Merchant
707797.  Mon May 10, 2010 12:35 pm Reply with quote

Provided they hold a bleeding Leadership Election which they must now. They can't have 2 unelected leaders in a row.

I think David Miliband might be the next one.


Last edited by Prof Wind Up Merchant on Fri Apr 21, 2017 2:03 pm; edited 3 times in total

 
Sadurian Mike
707839.  Mon May 10, 2010 2:52 pm Reply with quote

Except that Miliband or Labour haven't been elected.

 
suze
707864.  Mon May 10, 2010 4:35 pm Reply with quote

But neither has anyone else; that is rather the problem.

I have to agree that it would be unfortunate for Labour to have two consecutive Prime Ministers who were parachuted into the job despite not contesting the general election as leader. But if it's the only way we can get a government formed this week, then so be it.

As for the next leader, there seems to be a feeling that he or she has to be English - the last four Labour leaders haven't been, and there has been a certain amount of muttering in some quarters about the number of Scots in the positions of power.

So that's Douglas Alexander and Alistair Darling ruled out. Harriet Harperson makes it plain that she doesn't want the job, and in any case it would just be too strange for her to face David Cameron across the table at PMQs, what with them being related.

 
Jenny
707929.  Mon May 10, 2010 8:50 pm Reply with quote

William Hague was going on today about a new Labour leader being 'unelected'. Hasn't anybody told him we don't do Presidential-style elections here? MPs are elected by their constituents. Prime Ministers are chosen by the Parliamentary party (and the membership in Labour's case, I think?)

Yes:

Quote:
The leader is elected by the PLP (which is made up of all Labour MPs), trade union members affiliated to the Labour party, and ordinary party members. Each group is weighted to represent a third of the final vote. In this way, the selection of Labour leader is designed to reflects the party's foundations.

To get onto the leadership ballot candidates must have the support of 12.5 per cent of MPs


http://www.politics.co.uk/briefings-guides/issue-briefs/party-politics/labour/labour-leadership-$473302.htm

 
barbados
707934.  Tue May 11, 2010 12:17 am Reply with quote

That has been one of my bug bears of recent elections. Nobody had the choice to vote for either David Cameron, Nick Clegg, or Gordon Brown because they stood in different constituencies. You vote for you local MP, not a party. And the sooner people get the hang of that, the sooner we will get fairer representation in the HOC.

 
suze
708101.  Tue May 11, 2010 10:44 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
MPs are elected by their constituents. Prime Ministers are chosen by the Parliamentary party (and the membership in Labour's case, I think?)


The Conservative Party's system is now even more straightforward. It used to be that only MPs chose the leader, but William Hague changed that.

Under the system which was used for the first time when he stood down from the job, MPs held a series of ballots to reduce the number of candidates to two, and those two names were then put to the membership.

But that process gave the party Iain Duncan Smith, who was too anonymous for the media and too right wing for the non-Conservative public. So when he in turn stood down and was replaced by Michael Howard (who was unopposed, so no election took place), Mr Howard expressed a desire to revert to the old rules. He failed in that though, and Mr Cameron was elected under the same procedure as had been Mr Duncan Smith.


Gordon Brown was returned unopposed as Labour leader in succession to Tony Blair, so William Hague is essentially right in describing him as unelected. Although it's a bit rich of him to say so, what with Michael Howard too having been returned unopposed.

But moving on from there, the Conservatives have declared it as policy that anyone who becomes PM other than by leading the party to a win in a general election must call a general election within six months. They stated this as an objection to Gordon Brown becoming PM in 2007, and are set to do the same again if Labour should be in government when Mr Brown stands down. The Tories have presumably forgotten that John Major succeeded Margaret Thatcher as PM midterm, and did not call an election within six months.

 
barbados
708121.  Tue May 11, 2010 11:30 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Jenny wrote:
MPs are elected by their constituents. Prime Ministers are chosen by the Parliamentary party (and the membership in Labour's case, I think?)


The Conservative Party's system is now even more straightforward. It used to be that only MPs chose the leader, but William Hague changed that.

Under the system which was used for the first time when he stood down from the job, MPs held a series of ballots to reduce the number of candidates to two, and those two names were then put to the membership.

But that process gave the party Iain Duncan Smith, who was too anonymous for the media and too right wing for the non-Conservative public. So when he in turn stood down and was replaced by Michael Howard (who was unopposed, so no election took place), Mr Howard expressed a desire to revert to the old rules. He failed in that though, and Mr Cameron was elected under the same procedure as had been Mr Duncan Smith.

He also suffered the same problem that cost William Hague the premiership, he was folically challenged

 
Ian Dunn
708169.  Tue May 11, 2010 12:43 pm Reply with quote

I think David Milliband will win probably get it.

I know that last night on Newsnight Harriet Harman ruled herself out of the running.

 
Neotenic
708175.  Tue May 11, 2010 12:56 pm Reply with quote

Woo hoo!

I think Miliband is the sensible choice, but whoever picks up after Gordon is going to face the same problems as William Hague did, so I think there's a chance he may keep his powder dry for a run after whoever does take up the post has got the party over the hump and destroyed their reputation in the process.

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
708299.  Tue May 11, 2010 3:51 pm Reply with quote

What about the Shadow Chancellor job? Can't have Alistair Darling can we.


Last edited by Prof Wind Up Merchant on Tue May 11, 2010 3:55 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
barbados
708300.  Tue May 11, 2010 3:54 pm Reply with quote

Well thanks to today's fun the answer to the question in the poll has been answered. It's Harriet Harman that will succeed Gordon Brown as leader of the Labour Party, being the second woman to do so.

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
708302.  Tue May 11, 2010 4:03 pm Reply with quote

Harriet Harman is acting leader until we hope a Labour Leadership election is held by the National Labour Party Membership.

 
barbados
708304.  Tue May 11, 2010 4:06 pm Reply with quote

There is the possibility of a quick H question actually. Because for about 40 minutes or so we had a second female PM.

 
suze
708330.  Tue May 11, 2010 4:52 pm Reply with quote

Ooh, I rather like that, if it can be made to stack up! I have to say that I'm not certain about it - while Mr Brown was certainly no longer the Leader of the Labour Party when he got into a car and was driven to Buckingham Palace, was he still Prime Minister at that point?

The new Shadow Cabinet will be for Ms Harman to appoint, probably in the next few days. I'd rather expect the Shadow Chancellor to be Alistair Darling though, at least until the leadership contest has taken place and the new leader forms his or her own Shadow Cabinet.

 
barbados
708401.  Wed May 12, 2010 12:23 am Reply with quote

I was working on the premise that if the PM resigns as leader (although he doesn't have to be leader) of the party then the deputy stands in.

It is something we haven't come across before because usually the leader resigns when a suitable successor can be found, hence the original announcement to resign at the conference. But as I understand it, if the leader of a party resigns then the deputy takes over his role within the party in a caretaker manager type way on the grounds that the country must always have a PM.

It may be miles away from how things really work, but if I'm right it is a cracking GI point.

 

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