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Episode 7 Corrections

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Anna
30510.  Thu Nov 10, 2005 5:57 pm Reply with quote

I put the topic in the plural just in case someone else comes up with one. =D

Sean was correct when he said that the sign of the zodiac representing the goat is Capricorn. Stephen corrected him, saying it was Aries which is in fact the ram.

I don't think it was really an elvish mistake though and I guess it wasn't a crucial factual error in any case.

Also, just a question - in the Henry Ford quote why was colour spelled without a 'u'?

 
Jenny
30518.  Thu Nov 10, 2005 8:29 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
in the Henry Ford quote why was colour spelled without a 'u'?


Ford was American, so presumably he'd have spelled it the American way.

 
Quaint Idiot
30539.  Fri Nov 11, 2005 7:22 am Reply with quote

Capricornus (as astronomers call it) is usually termed the sea-goat. Apparently it was originally some other chimaera entirely, according to http://www.eastbayastro.org/articles/lore/capricor.htm

 
Anna
30540.  Fri Nov 11, 2005 7:46 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Quote:
in the Henry Ford quote why was colour spelled without a 'u'?


Ford was American, so presumably he'd have spelled it the American way.


I guess I should have written "quote" (with quotation marks), since he never said/wrote anything of the kind. It just struck me as odd.

 
Theophilus
30679.  Fri Nov 11, 2005 5:55 pm Reply with quote

Hi,

When Stephen was casually listing animals from which we can get milk he mentioned Yaks. This is, I believe, a common error and one that Tibetans often laugh at (at least I think that's why they were laughing at me); the Yak is the male of the species and hence can not be milked. The female of the species is the "dri", and that's where "Yak" milk comes from. Only a technical point, I guess, but nearly interesting.

 
Frederick The Monk
30690.  Fri Nov 11, 2005 6:21 pm Reply with quote

That's very interesting. If Stephen had been listing animals in Tibetan then he would indeed have been wrong as the female of Bos grunniens is, as you rightly say, known as a dri or nak. In English however both sexes are generally referred to as Yaks.

There are less than 2000 yaks in North America.

s:
http://www.tibet.net/tibbul/0009/focus1.html
http://www.tibetanyaks.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yak

 
Flash
30702.  Fri Nov 11, 2005 7:57 pm Reply with quote

The 'color' spelling was just a little jokelet we stuck in, referring, as Jenny says, to the fact that Ford was American and if he had said it, that's how he would have spelt it.

 
Jenny
30737.  Fri Nov 11, 2005 11:49 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
There are less than 2000 yaks in North America


That one ought to go to the thread to nitpick about QI points of language Fred. Traditionally, 'less' is used for things you can measure, but 'fewer' for things that can be counted, so strictly speaking there are fewer than 2000 yaks in North America. But it comes to the same thing I suppose.

 
Caradoc
31298.  Mon Nov 14, 2005 8:45 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
The 'color' spelling was just a little jokelet we stuck in, referring, as Jenny says, to the fact that Ford was American and if he had said it, that's how he would have spelt it.


When did the US start using the color spelling? Before or after Ford left school?

 
dr.bob
31404.  Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:45 am Reply with quote

I read somewhere that "color" (and all those other words without the letter "u") was actually the accepted english spelling back in the 17th century, and it's us who have changed how we spell things.

No idea if that's true, though, as I'm not a linguist. Guess it might've just been USAian propoganda :)

 
JumpingJack
31500.  Tue Nov 15, 2005 5:24 pm Reply with quote

A harmless drudge writes:

I am afraid you are woefully misinformed, Dr Bob.

Colour has been spelt in numerous ways in English English over the centuries. The first mention in print is colur (1290) rather than either 'color' or 'colour'.

This was followed by:

color and culoure (1498)
colowre (1551)
colour (1577)
coolor (1599)

As to the 17th century, there are 32 quotations using the word in the complete Oxford English Dictionary (1933).

Of these, 30 are spelt colour, including references by Shakespeare (1601), the Bible (1611), Fletcher (1616), Beaumont (1617), Pepys (1661), Bunyan (1668), Newton (1671), Locke (1692) and Vanbrugh (1697).

There are only two quoted exceptions coulour by some bloke called Camden in 1605 and only one spelt 'the American way' as color by J.Spencer (who he?–Ed) in 1663.

Colour has aslo been spelt colure, coulur, collor, cooler, coullour, cullor, and culler but the spelling 'color' appears to be extremely rare on this side of the pond.

 
dr.bob
31620.  Wed Nov 16, 2005 8:43 am Reply with quote

I feel suitably enlightened. Thank you.

I will now return to the normal feeling of smug superiority over our cousins across the water :)

 
Quaint Idiot
31631.  Wed Nov 16, 2005 9:46 am Reply with quote

However there are, of course, a number of words which have dropped out of use in Britain, but not in America. Examples include gotten, Fall (for Autumn) and zee (for the letter zed, for which izzard was also used at one time). So it's no use complaining about 'Americans abusing our language' with these words.

source: OED

 
tarzanb
32191.  Thu Nov 17, 2005 5:16 pm Reply with quote

Anna wrote:
Jenny wrote:
Quote:
in the Henry Ford quote why was colour spelled without a 'u'?


Ford was American, so presumably he'd have spelled it the American way.


I guess I should have written "quote" (with quotation marks), since he never said/wrote anything of the kind. It just struck me as odd.



hi,
it has really been bothering me. on this QI i saw the other day stephen said that Henry ford did not in fact say "any colour so long as its black" well i got into an argument with my french teacher as to the truth of this statement but i cant find any credible info to prove myself right that Ford did not say this.
i would be really grateful if anyone could help me in my search for the truth as he is the most annoying man you will ever meet and i would, along with my fellow classmates, love to prove him wrong.
waiting impatiently
-Tarzanb

 
tarzanb
32193.  Thu Nov 17, 2005 5:17 pm Reply with quote

Anna wrote:
Jenny wrote:
Quote:
in the Henry Ford quote why was colour spelled without a 'u'?


Ford was American, so presumably he'd have spelled it the American way.


I guess I should have written "quote" (with quotation marks), since he never said/wrote anything of the kind. It just struck me as odd.



hi,
it has really been bothering me. on this QI i saw the other day stephen said that Henry ford did not in fact say "any colour so long as its black" well i got into an argument with my french teacher as to the truth of this statement but i cant find any credible info to prove myself right that Ford did not say this.
i would be really grateful if anyone could help me in my search for the truth as he is the most annoying man you will ever meet and i would, along with my fellow classmates, love to prove him wrong.
waiting impatiently
-Tarzanb

 

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