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How do you pronounce this?

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Curious Danny
683889.  Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:00 am Reply with quote

Simply really - how do you pronounce the phrase on this sign?

 
Neotenic
683891.  Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:02 am Reply with quote

I pronounce it 'nom nom nom nom nom'

 
masterfroggy
683893.  Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:08 am Reply with quote

I'll risk the klaxon
"you old sweet shop"

 
monzac
683898.  Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:17 am Reply with quote

Klaxon me, too, then.

Better if one can avoid saying it ;)

 
Moosh
684008.  Wed Mar 17, 2010 11:09 am Reply with quote

"The old sweet shop". Ye in this context being a shorthand for the not for you.

 
CB27
684044.  Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:06 pm Reply with quote

We having a "thorny" debate?

 
masterfroggy
684359.  Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:14 am Reply with quote

Moosh wrote:
"The old sweet shop". Ye in this context being a shorthand for the not for you.

Or not,
"e" would 'the'
Ye would be you.

 
Moosh
684361.  Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:46 am Reply with quote

Quote:
ye (article)
old or quaintly archaic way of writing the, in which the -y- is a 16c. graphic alteration of , an O.E. character (generally called "thorn," originally a Gmc. rune; see th-) that represented the "hard" -th- sound at the beginning of the. Early printers, whose types were founded on the continent, did not have a , so they substituted y as the letter that looked most like it. But in such usages it was not pronounced "y." Ye for the (and yt for that) continued in manuscripts through 18c. Revived 19c. as a deliberate antiquarianism; the Ye Olde _____ construction was being mocked by 1896.


From http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=ye&searchmode=none

 
monzac
684362.  Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:50 am Reply with quote

Moosh wrote:
"The old sweet shop". Ye in this context being a shorthand for the not for you.

It is, if the letter thorn is used. What one usually sees is <y>.

 
bemahan
684411.  Thu Mar 18, 2010 5:35 am Reply with quote

I suspect the shop would like you to pronounce is as "Yee Oldee Sweet Shoppee" As something of a sweet officionado, I certainly would like to pronounce it that way to gain maximum psychological effect of the 'old-fashioned' overpowering sweetie smell as I cross the threshold. For ultimate enjoyment, I think they should have called it "Ye Olde Sweetie Shoppe".

 
Curious Danny
684446.  Thu Mar 18, 2010 6:17 am Reply with quote

It is a defunct letter we are dealing with - "thorn" - which has now been replaced by "th" but can also be represented as a "y".
So if anyone says "there is ye olde sweet shop" you can say it is actually pronounced "the"
It can also mean you though, as in "Ye Gods!".
It is rather confusing, rather like "wherefore art thou Romeo", which actually means "why are you Romeo [Montague]" rather than "where are you Romeo"

 

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