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Zebra57
675823.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 2:15 pm Reply with quote

Suze: I include this quote for QI information.

The name "Test" may have arisen from the idea that the matches are a "test of strength and competency" between the sides involved. It seems to have been used first to describe an English team that toured Australia in 1861–62, although those matches are not considered Test matches today. The first officially recognised test match commenced on 15 March 1877, contested by England and Australia at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG), where Australia won by 45 runs. England won the second ever match (also at the MCG) by four wickets, thus drawing the series 1–1. This was not the first ever international cricket match however, which was played between Canada and the United States, on 24 and 25 of September 1844.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Test_cricket

 
tchrist
675985.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 12:18 am Reply with quote

britishsm wrote:
I am informed that the sausage is known as a "link" in America (from the "chain" or string of sausages) and that the term "Hot Links" is also widely used.


You may be right, but I have never heard link used like that here. It sounds like something from a New York deli; but really, I have no idea. That said, I'm not particularly familiar with the East Coast or Deep South. I don't think it would be recognized in the Midwest or the West. But who knows what they'll pull out of certain Chicago neighborhoods? Chicago red hots are pretty fancy when fully dressed with cucumbers, tomatoes, hot banana peppers, onions, mustard, and relish (but no catsup).

--tom

 
tchrist
676001.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 2:21 am Reply with quote

I wrote:
I have never heard link used like that here. ... But who knows what they'll pull out of certain Chicago neighborhoods? Chicago red hots are pretty fancy

Digging into the product list of the company I link to above, one finds:
  1. PURE BEEF SAUSAGE PRODUCTS
    • Skinless FRANKS
    • Skinless JALAPEÑO CHEDDAR FRANKS
    • Skinless POLISH
    • HOT N' SPICY Skinless Franks
    • Natural Casing FRANKS
    • Natural Casing POLISH
    • Premium CORN DOGS

  2. PORK & BEEF SAUSAGE PRODUCTS
    • Skinless HOT DOGS
    • Natural Casing ITALIAN SAUSAGE
    • Skinless w/cheese SMOKED SAUSAGE
    • Natural Casing BRATWURST
    • Skinless Brats
    • Natural Casing POLISH SAUSAGE (Kielbasa)

  3. FRESH/FROZEN SAUSAGE PRODUCTS
    • Roped Italian, Mild
    • Roped Italian, Hot
    • Hot Links, Beef
    • Chorizo Sausage
    • Italian Links
I'd guess that the sausages listed in 3 are connected together. These "hot links, beef" do seem to be distinct from the hot dogs listed earlier.

Many local eateries serve Chicago Red Hots (from the referenced shop) up in Lake Geneva (Wisconsin) where I grew up about 75 miles northwest of Chicago. We never saw quite the variety of sausages listed above, only top-grade "red hot Chicago dogs" or "Vienna franks" (that is, pure-beef frankfurters), italian or polish sausage (I can't recall which, but probably a skinless one), brats (with skins), hot dogs (lower grade, mixed with pork), and corn dogs. The shop also sells "sliced Italian beef" (whatever that really means); it's pretty popular served as a hot "sandwich" au jus, which really needs to be eaten with a knife and fork.

Hm, I imagine the chorizo is the Mexican kind, not the Spanish kind. That's a new thing, not really "traditional". Chicago has plenty of Hispanics these days, of course, but the older Italian and Polish neighborhoods make a larger mark on our sausage-making there, as you can see above.

--tom

 
Efros
676009.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:39 am Reply with quote

Hot links are spicy sausages usually of the Italian or Polish persuasion. Some are incredibly spicy, and can make an otherwise fairly bland spaghetti sauce rather interesting.

Sausages generally are not treated the same in the US as in the UK, sausages and onion gravy with mashed potato for example would not be served here. In fact the only ways I've seen sausage served here is either in a sandwich/roll or as a component of a stew/pizza. One thing I can't handle is the addition of maple syrup to some 'breakfast' sausages, it's just not right.

 
RLDavies
676177.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:42 am Reply with quote

I'm quite prepared to accept that neither hot dogs nor ice cream cones were invented at the St Louis Exposition. (Having grown up in St Louis, this is what I was taught, for obvious reasons.)

Is it safe to say that they were widely popularised by their appearance in the Expo?

 
bobwilson
676462.  Sat Feb 27, 2010 12:21 am Reply with quote

No discussion of Hot Dogs would be complete without the immortal lyric from Led Zeppelin

She took my heart She took my keys
From out my old blue Dungarees
And I'm never going to Texas anymore

 
bobwilson
676463.  Sat Feb 27, 2010 12:22 am Reply with quote

Quote:
This reflection brings to mind the horrible revenge taken by a wag upon a pork seller who was famed for the excellence of his sausages. Entering his shop on Saturday evening, when it was quite full of customers purchasing savory meat for the morrow's dinner, the ruthless man approached the counter, and with a matter-of-course, business-like air, threw down a dead cat, saying "That makes nineteen! you are busy now, I'll call again for the money!" and retired.


Brilliant!!!

 
masterfroggy
676658.  Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:57 pm Reply with quote

RLDavies wrote:
I'm quite prepared to accept that neither hot dogs nor ice cream cones were invented at the St Louis Exposition. (Having grown up in St Louis, this is what I was taught, for obvious reasons.)

Is it safe to say that they were widely popularised by their appearance in the Expo?

I'd have to say that's a no, they were quite popular in Paris England and Italy. I'm sure that the Italo Marchiony machine for making multiple cones made it cheaper and that may have enabled less well off people to buy ice-creams.

 
Lukecash
677599.  Tue Mar 02, 2010 2:54 pm Reply with quote

masterfroggy wrote:
Lukecash wrote:
The Term Hot Dog, despite masterfroggy obvious cultural jealousy, is an American term that existed before the St. Louis Exposition in 1904.

Please read my post. I'm sure (maybe not) you may find it helpful to read it before shooting off your mouth.


And if you read my post I said the TERM hot dog. not the actual item. It's clear that the ingredients of the hot dog came from several European. Much like many things "invented" in United States, came from other countries.

I was attempting to be good humor about your good nature American ribbing. Apparently you feel you make comments of that nature, but not receive them. As Winston Churchill once said, "If you can't take the heat, stay out of the Kitchen."

 
Efros
677610.  Tue Mar 02, 2010 3:17 pm Reply with quote

Ermm wasn't that Truman? Harrry S. rather than Capote.

 
masterfroggy
677622.  Tue Mar 02, 2010 4:40 pm Reply with quote

Lukecash wrote:


I was attempting to be good humor about your good nature American ribbing. Apparently you feel you make comments of that nature, but not receive them. As Winston Churchill once said, "If you can't take the heat, stay out of the Kitchen."
I call bull chips on the "I was only Joking" escape clause. Your post failed because you didn't read my post and your rebuttal fails as well for the same reason.
BTW Harry S is the person most often associated with the quote.
Churchill said "Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm". So there is hope....

 
Lukecash
677718.  Wed Mar 03, 2010 4:13 am Reply with quote

masterfroggy

Subtlety isn't your strong point, is it?

Let's look at the sequence of posts, shall we?

masterfroggy wrote:
Lukecash wrote:


Nobody knows where the term Hot Dog came from...but it was invented sometime mid 19th century


I’m sure it was invented by an American round about 1420CE, no doubt when they went to watch another American invention Baseball.


I assume your post was mocking the usual American claim to invent many things. In good humor of course, which is how I took it.


Then came this post

masterfroggy wrote:
RLDavies wrote:
Based entirely on my own battered memory cells, the idea of putting a sausage in a bun and calling it a "hot dog" started in the St Louis Exposition in 1904. Turning it from a sausage into a sandwich made it easier to eat while walking around at the fair. Calling a sausage a "dog" is fairly typical for turn-of-the-century American slang, and I think the proprietor of the Expo sausage stand painted a jolly sign of a dachshund in a bun.

The St Louis Exposition was also the birthplace of the ice cream cone, when an ice cream stand got together with the neighbouring waffle stand to offer a joint treat -- again, easier to walk around with.

You’ll be saying next that the Americans invented peanut butter and sliced bread!

The sausage in a bun was first recorded as being served 1870, on Coney Island
The ice-cream cone was mentioned in English cookbooks as far back as 1825.


Apparently you keep mocking Americans, which is fine. It's all good fun.

We know we didn't invent peanut butter, but the machine that allowed a sliced loaf to be sold, was invented in Iowa. (But yes, I'm SURE Europe the concept of slicing bread with a knife.)

But RLDavies pointed out a possible origin of the term "Hot Dog" based in the St. Louis Exposition of 1904. So in a more of a response to him, with a nice little jab at you I wrote.

Lukecash wrote:
The Term Hot Dog, despite masterfroggy obvious cultural jealousy, is an American term that existed before the St. Louis Exposition in 1904.


This is obviously a joke, considering the tone and content of your previous posts-which were mocking the usual U.S. beliefs that we've invented everything.

And yes, I knew that the quote I used in my previous posts came from Harry S. Truman, not Churchill- I thought it was an OBVIOUS joke considering your harping on Brits inventing Cricket and Ice Cream Cones ( Not quite, Edible cones have been mentioned in French cooking books as early as 1825, Julien Archambault describes a cone where one can roll "little waffles".)

Now, I've been more than polite and good humored with you. I'm not sure why you are reacting the way you have been. Nor am I apologizing either...but look to your own previous post than to write in a knee jerk response.

 
masterfroggy
677751.  Wed Mar 03, 2010 5:36 am Reply with quote

Lukecash wrote:
masterfroggy

Subtlety isn't your strong point, is it?
Snip
Now, I've been more than polite and good humored with you. I'm not sure why you are reacting the way you have been. Nor am I apologizing either...but look to your own previous post than to write in a knee jerk response.


Reading is, as I have said before, is not really your strong point.
The old bait and switch may work for others sites but not here.
To put things straight
1. Americans invented peanut butter, (the Incas)
2. A bread pre-slicing machine was invented by an American (selling pre sliced bread as apposed to slicing at home)
3. Coney island is in America
4. I never said ice-cream cones were invented by the English, just that they were mentioned in English cook books, (funny thing is the English cook books were directly copied by Americans right up until 1825 when an American lady wrote, what is considered to be, the first real American cookbook. "The Virginia house-wife", which is a direct reference to another cookbook from where came quite a few recipes “An English huswife” within that book are instructions to make wafers (using a waffled iron) “baked white or brown and shaped at your pleasure”.

 
Lukecash
678601.  Fri Mar 05, 2010 4:34 am Reply with quote

Masterfroggy
Fair enough.

I am not sure if you are aware, but many Americans believed that George Washington Carver invented the Peanut Butter. That is what I thought you were commenting on.

The only thing I would quibble a bit is that the Incas are a pre-Columbian society and the term "America" had yet been invented. That and they are from Peru, which would more accurately called South Americans.

For myself, I honestly don't consider sliced bread an invention-but a result. I am sure bread was sliced manually before this time. Now if term was "Greatest invention since pre-sliced bread loafs", then I would almost agree.

As for the Ice Cream cone, I thought it was created in St. Louis. It was your comment that it was mentioned in British Cookbooks. I went to verify this info when I came across the information about the French cookbooks that pre-dated your information. So I learned something new, thanks to you.

Considering that United States was a British Colony, I would assume that we would get most of our books from england

The cookbook The Viriginia Housewife is replicated at Feeding America site. It's known more for the first cookbook to print regional recipies, than the first "American Cookbook". The author, from my quick glance, offers local and international dishes-and labels them as such. Longed used and wide spread dishes from other countries were considered "local" at that point.

However neither Ice Cream nor Waffles are labeled from England.
Ice Creams served in her book Molded Into Shapes or served in a glass. Nothing is mentioned about putting it into cones. Waffels or Waffers are listed a few pages before under cakes. But no direct relation are placed to connect them.

The first book that had cornets and Ice Cream was Mrs. A.B. Marshall's Book of Cookery 1888. So combining the French Cone with the ice Cream is an English idea. However, since The Virgina Houswife was published in 1838, I doubt that Mrs. Marshall had any influence on a cookbook that was published 17 years before she was born.

However, Since Mrs. Agnes Bertha Marshal was a famous cook and ran a staffing agency, it could very well be that a few of her workers, clients or fans of her book, brought the idea to America...where somebody at some point popularized the Ice Cream cone.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1248822.  Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:52 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
There are plenty of cricket leagues in the USA today, it's just that few of the players are natural born citizens. As in many countries where cricket is a minority sport, people who play it in the USA are for the most part people who have immigrated from the major cricket playing lands. (In the USA, that's primarily South Asia and the English speaking Caribbean. I'm also aware of an Australian who runs a team in Kansas.)

I remember posting once about cricket at one of the Ivy League schools. It was noted that most of the cricket team were Indian or Jamaican, but there had been one American born guy on the team the previous year.

Much the same is true of cricket in Canada. The first time the Canadian team reached the World Cup in 1979, there were three "proper Canadians" on the team, while today there are none. The people who are the age to be the sons of those three men tend to play baseball or soccer instead as their summer sport.

The current national team is predominantly of Indian birth, and some are only marginally Canadian. Notably, John Davision - Canada's only world class player of recent years - was born on Vancouver Island, but his parents were Australian and he's lived in Australia for most of his life.

But it's slowly changing. Canada had a very successful Under 15 team a couple years back, and a majority of that team was Canadian born. Most were of South Asian origins, but there were also white and black players among the squad. (The Canada women's team is mostly posh white girls from Toronto. That two of the team are over fifty may give an idea of just how little women's cricket there is in Canada.)


Cricket also has a substantial cult following in Greece. It developed especially in Corfu which was occupied by Britain from 1823 to 1864. By 1893 a Gymnastikos club had emerged whose sole opponents were visiting British sailors. By 1923 the Ergatikos club was formed, eventually renaming itself after Lord Byron. Highlights pre-WW1 were the 1904 season where the C-in-C of the Mediterranean fleet attended the festival and the 1932 season when the festival was attended by the Prince of Wales.

In 1996 British Airways sponsored a trip for a Greek side to tour and play overseas cricket matches and this led to Greek teams playing matches in England. In 1997 the Hellenic Cricket Federation was formed which is an affiliate of the ICC.

Source: http://realcorfu.com/cricket-in-corfu/

 

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