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Ian Dunn
674944.  Wed Feb 24, 2010 5:18 am Reply with quote

The American Academy of Pediatrics has recently ruled that hot dogs are dangerous to children because they are a choking risk, with some calling for hot dogs to be given warning labels. The Academy reported that, "About 17% of food-related asphyxiations in those younger than 10 are caused by hot dogs, according to a 41-state study cited in the paper. The Academy even recommended that hot dogs be redesigned to make it less likely that they will get lodged in the throats of the young."

I came across this in an article on the Time Magazine website entitled "Top 10 Most Dangerous Foods". The other food they claimed where dangerous were:

2) Fugu (Japanese poisonous fish)

3) Ackee (Jamacian fruit which if eaten wrongly can lead to "Jamacian Vomiting Sickness" which can be deadly)

4) Peanuts (Due to peanut allergy. Approx. 1% of Americans have a peanut allergy and the figure is rising)

5) Leafy greens such as spinach, lettuce, cabbage, arugula and kale (Due to risk of Nirovirus because of poor handling. Also risk from E. Coli and salmonella.)

6) Rhubarb (Poisonous leaves)

7) Tuna (Concerns of mercury poisoning and Scombroid)

8) Cassava/Tapioca (Risk of cyanide if prepared incorrectly)

9) Coffee (Increased heart rate and extreme heat)

10) Mushrooms (Various types are poisonous)

 
gerontius grumpus
675276.  Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:03 pm Reply with quote

Some years ago a colleague had to do post mortem x-rays of a toddler who had choked to death on a piece of sausage that lodged in his trachea.
It was a deeply tragic case which none of those involved will ever forget.

 
Zebra57
675417.  Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:49 pm Reply with quote

I have always been curious where the "dog" comes from in hot dog. This could confuse a Korean.

 
bobwilson
675425.  Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:59 pm Reply with quote

I don't want to derail the thread but I'm a bit suspicious of an organisation which lists:

Quote:
5) Leafy greens such as spinach, lettuce, cabbage, arugula and kale (Due to risk of Nirovirus because of poor handling. Also risk from E. Coli and salmonella.)


You might as well list anything if it's due to poor handling.

Quote:
6) Rhubarb (Poisonous leaves)


Erm - we're not eating the leaves. How about including blackberries - because if you were to eat the rest of the plant then you'd risk severe internal scratching.

Quote:
10) Mushrooms (Various types are poisonous)


Water - because if it's not prepared correctly, or comes from your toilet immediately after defecation, it is extremely dangerous.

That's it - ban water - it's far too dangerous.

 
Lukecash
675467.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 1:43 am Reply with quote

When King George VI and his queen visited Franklin and Elanor Roosevelt in 1939, they wanted to serve them something "American" for lunch. So The Roosevelt cooked up Hot Dogs, which King George apparently liked and had seconds.

This was the menu for the picnic

MENU FOR PICNIC AT HYDE PARK
Sunday, June 11, 1939

Virginia Ham
Hot Dogs (if weather permits)
Smoked Turkey
Cranberry Jelly
Green Salad
Rolls
Strawberry Shortcake
Coffee, Beer, Soft Drinks

However there was some controversy about such a menu. Elanor wrote in her column "My Day" about her own mother complaining about how it would be perceived.

Quote:
Oh dear, oh dear, so many people are worried that the 'dignity of our country will be imperiled by inviting Royalty to a picnic, particularly a hot dog picnic! My mother-in-law has sent me a letter which begs that she control me in some way. In order to spare my feelings, she has written on the back a little message: "Only one of many such." She did not know, poor darling, that I have "many such" right here in Washington. Let me assure you, dear readers, that if it is hot there will be no hot dogs, and even if it is cool there will be plenty of other food, and the elder members of the family and the more important guests will be served with due formality



[url=http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/HotDog/HDIndex.htm]A nice little timeline on the legends of Hot Dogs
[/url]

Nobody knows where the term Hot Dog came from...but it was invented sometime mid 19th century

 
masterfroggy
675479.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 3:16 am Reply with quote

Lukecash wrote:


Nobody knows where the term Hot Dog came from...but it was invented sometime mid 19th century


Iím sure it was invented by an American round about 1420CE, no doubt when they went to watch another American invention Baseball.

 
soup
675506.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 4:16 am Reply with quote

masterfroggy wrote:
another American invention Baseball.


No it's no.

Far from being an American invented game, essentially the roots of Baseball are English, as are the roots of cricket, rounders etc; all developed from earlier bat and ball games.

 
masterfroggy
675508.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 4:24 am Reply with quote

soup wrote:
masterfroggy wrote:
another American invention Baseball.


No it's no.

Far from being an American invented game, essentially the roots of Baseball are English, as are the roots of cricket, rounders etc; all developed from earlier bat and ball games.
Oh the irony, you didn't see the date in my post?

 
RLDavies
675666.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 8:36 am Reply with quote

Based entirely on my own battered memory cells, the idea of putting a sausage in a bun and calling it a "hot dog" started in the St Louis Exposition in 1904. Turning it from a sausage into a sandwich made it easier to eat while walking around at the fair. Calling a sausage a "dog" is fairly typical for turn-of-the-century American slang, and I think the proprietor of the Expo sausage stand painted a jolly sign of a dachshund in a bun.

The St Louis Exposition was also the birthplace of the ice cream cone, when an ice cream stand got together with the neighbouring waffle stand to offer a joint treat -- again, easier to walk around with.

The aviary that was built for the exposition was retained by the city, and they built the St Louis Zoo around it. I'm not sure whether it still stands today, but it was certainly there in the 1960s and 70s.

 
masterfroggy
675748.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 11:39 am Reply with quote

RLDavies wrote:
Based entirely on my own battered memory cells, the idea of putting a sausage in a bun and calling it a "hot dog" started in the St Louis Exposition in 1904. Turning it from a sausage into a sandwich made it easier to eat while walking around at the fair. Calling a sausage a "dog" is fairly typical for turn-of-the-century American slang, and I think the proprietor of the Expo sausage stand painted a jolly sign of a dachshund in a bun.

The St Louis Exposition was also the birthplace of the ice cream cone, when an ice cream stand got together with the neighbouring waffle stand to offer a joint treat -- again, easier to walk around with.

Youíll be saying next that the Americans invented peanut butter and sliced bread!

The sausage in a bun was first recorded as being served 1870, on Coney Island
The ice-cream cone was mentioned in English cookbooks as far back as 1825.

 
soup
675750.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 11:39 am Reply with quote

masterfroggy wrote:
]Oh the irony, you didn't see the date in my post?


1420CE ?

 
Lukecash
675760.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 11:56 am Reply with quote

The Term Hot Dog, despite masterfroggy obvious cultural jealousy, is an American term that existed before the St. Louis Exposition in 1904.

In an issue of the 1895 Yale Record there was a poem
ECHOES FROM THE LUNCH WAGON

"'Tis dogs' delight to bark and bite,"
Thus does the adage run.
But I delight to bite the dog
When placed inside a bun.

As RL Davies pointed out, dog was the slang for any sausages. One theory is that when street vendors sold their goods, they would say things like "Cold Drinks, Hot Dogs!"

The sausage it self has origins in both Frankfurt and Vienna (Both claim to be the originators) Who decided to put it in a bun, much like the ingredients of the hot dog, remains a mystery. More than likely it was an unkown European immigrant who came to America.

 
masterfroggy
675763.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 11:59 am Reply with quote

soup wrote:
masterfroggy wrote:
]Oh the irony, you didn't see the date in my post?


1420CE ?
Ok so it was a mis-type:)


google 'Frankfurter Wurst' which was invented/made/recorded as having been made in 1480s

 
masterfroggy
675764.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 12:01 pm Reply with quote

Lukecash wrote:
The Term Hot Dog, despite masterfroggy obvious cultural jealousy, is an American term that existed before the St. Louis Exposition in 1904.

Please read my post. I'm sure (maybe not) you may find it helpful to read it before shooting off your mouth.

 
britishsm
675786.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 12:40 pm Reply with quote

taken from The United States Democratic Review Volume 0023 Issue 122 (Aug 1848) "The Gossip Of the Month"

Quote:
July has not been without events of interest, even leaving out of consideration the leopard hunt and the dog massacre. The Mayor's idea of abolishing the office of dog killer, and leaving it's function to be discharged by the community at large, is eminently in keeping with the democratic spirit of the age, and the event has shown how, even in the matter of dogs, private enterprise outstrips official duty.


Quote:
No one with the statistics of recent canine slaughter before his eyes could be so fool-hardy as to purchase sausages. This reflection brings to mind the horrible revenge taken by a wag upon a pork seller who was famed for the excellence of his sausages. Entering his shop on Saturday evening, when it was quite full of customers purchasing savory meat for the morrow's dinner, the ruthless man approached the counter, and with a matter-of-course, business-like air, threw down a dead cat, saying "That makes nineteen! you are busy now, I'll call again for the money!" and retired. In vain did the unhappy sausage-maker protest that he was utterly ignorant and innocent of the whole affair. Though to protest was a very gentlemanlike offer in the time of Juliet's Nurse, it was now unavailing; the shop was deserted, and its keeper ever after mewed at by all the ragged urchins of the neighborhood.


One New York based paper is alleged to have reported - "Sausages have fallen in price one half, in New York, since the dog killers have commenced operations."

Modern Baseball was formalised around 1845 in New York.

As has previously been stated, vendors at baseball games could well have cried out "Cold Drinks" .. but "Hot Sausages" would have been too long, especially when they could be more humorous/macabre and shout "Hot Dogs!".

(a folk etymology of my own making of course - but I've shown my working! :) )

I am informed that the sausage is known as a "link" in America (from the "chain" or string of sausages) and that the term "Hot Links" is also widely used.

B.

 

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