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Woodlouse

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King of Quok
155694.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 4:17 pm Reply with quote

After some particulalrly thrilling dinner conversation, I thought I'd ask if anyone can come up with any alternative common names for woodlice (or arthropods of the order Oniscidea, if we're being technical). My dinner companions were discussing why we call woodlice what we do; to my grandmother they were always 'cheesybugs', but to the others at the table they were 'monkeypeas', 'slaters' (which to me is a sort of marine arthropod, instead of a woodlouse), 'pillbugs' or 'pill millipedes'. I've heard them called 'doodlebugs', 'armadillo-bugs' and 'rolypolys' before, but does anyone know of any others. It strikes me that for such small creatures, they're positively embarrased by common names. Or does anyone know of any other animals with more alternative common names?

 
Bondee
155697.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 4:19 pm Reply with quote

We used to call them ballbugs.

The fallen tree in the car park of our local pub was a never ending source of them. We used to play marbles with them, little sods that we were.

 
grizzly
155700.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 4:52 pm Reply with quote

Just woodlice here. However, my sister was so fascinated by them that she would regularly bring them into the house before she turned 6 years old.

The wiki article has a list of names:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodlice

 
grizzly
155702.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 5:05 pm Reply with quote

Armadilloidea is the name of a superfamily of woodlice. Could make for a good GI question along the lines of the puffinus puffinus question in the D series.

 
Ameena
155711.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 6:12 pm Reply with quote

I've always called 'em woodlice, but some people in Junior School used to call 'em pea bugs.

 
indigo fugit
155714.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 6:21 pm Reply with quote

Ameena wrote:
I've always called 'em woodlice, but some people in Junior School used to call 'em pea bugs.


Pea bug I feel must be the 'pill bug'

If you touch a Pill Bug it rolls itself into a ball.

 
Ameena
155715.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 6:24 pm Reply with quote

Yeah, and peas are kinda ball-shaped. I never called 'em pea bugs - it was the weird other kids at school! ;)

 
indigo fugit
155716.  Sun Mar 11, 2007 6:29 pm Reply with quote

Ameena wrote:
Yeah, and peas are kinda ball-shaped. I never called 'em pea bugs - it was the weird other kids at school! ;)


Yeer... they look the same but the Pill Bug is very rare.

 
BondiTram
155806.  Mon Mar 12, 2007 7:18 am Reply with quote

Pedantic little sod that I was (am?), I would get almost apoplectic at school every time someone spoke of 'a woodlice'.
Apart from that, they are really quite interesting being aquatic. I think they have gills. I saw one in my pond quite happily wandering about under the surface. Well if he wasn't a woodlouse, he was certainly a very close relative.
Apart from all that, its name reminds me of a large lady in sensible shoes blowing up horses' noses and talking in a silly voice to dogs.

 
indigo fugit
155810.  Mon Mar 12, 2007 7:25 am Reply with quote

BondiTram wrote:
Pedantic little sod that I was (am?), I would get almost apoplectic at school every time someone spoke of 'a woodlice'.
Apart from that, they are really quite interesting being aquatic. I think they have gills. I saw one in my pond quite happily wandering about under the surface. Well if he wasn't a woodlouse, he was certainly a very close relative.
Apart from all that, its name reminds me of a large lady in sensible shoes blowing up horses' noses and talking in a silly voice to dogs.


Pedantic you may well be.

Unlike most Pedants you have a well developed sense of humour.

 
Spinoza
155817.  Mon Mar 12, 2007 7:32 am Reply with quote

BondiTram wrote:
Pedantic little sod that I was (am?), I would get almost apoplectic at school every time someone spoke of 'a woodlice'.
Apart from that, they are really quite interesting being aquatic. I think they have gills. I saw one in my pond quite happily wandering about under the surface. Well if he wasn't a woodlouse, he was certainly a very close relative.
Apart from all that, its name reminds me of a large lady in sensible shoes blowing up horses' noses and talking in a silly voice to dogs.


Woodlice are NOT aquatic, but there is a very common relative of woodlice which is, which is often found in garden ponds. It has various common names, but its proper name is Asellus aquaticus

 
Sprauncy
155867.  Mon Mar 12, 2007 11:24 am Reply with quote

Around my way children sometimes call them 'cheesy-bobs'. To me they were always 'woodlice'.
There seems to be mostly the type of woodlouse which doesn't roll up where I live. They are flatter and dull, compared with the ones which do roll up.
I remember as a child finding a curled up woodlouse, and throwing it down on the patio to see if it bounced. It did, quite well, but I felt so guilty in case I hurt it.

 
gerontius grumpus
155908.  Mon Mar 12, 2007 2:24 pm Reply with quote

The sea slater Ligia oceanica is another relative of the woodlouse, it lives in the splash zone on rocky shores and can grow surprisingly large, about 2.5 cm.

 
King of Quok
155960.  Mon Mar 12, 2007 7:17 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:
The sea slater Ligia oceanica is another relative of the woodlouse, it lives in the splash zone on rocky shores and can grow surprisingly large, about 2.5 cm.


Yes, that's what I've always known as a slater, hence my confusion over my Glaswegian friend referring to his terrestrial relative Porcellio scaber as a slater.

 
swot
156022.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 6:38 am Reply with quote

BondiTram wrote:
Pedantic little sod that I was (am?), I would get almost apoplectic at school every time someone spoke of 'a woodlice'.


Did you ever roll a dice when playing snakes and ladders?

I saw a sign in a shop the other day that advertised 'dices'. I almost screamed until I realised that English was not the proprietor's native tongue.

 

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