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QI Words and Etymology

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Bondee
746612.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 8:46 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
Bondee wrote:
Ian Dunn wrote:
Qutopia - coined by Winston Churchill. A qutopia is a communist country were the people have to que endlessly for everything.


Que?


Sorry, I'm guessing it is "cutopia".


Sorry, I was taking the piss. That was a Manuel-esque "Que?" cos you left a couple of letters out of queue.

 
Jenny
746727.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 5:48 pm Reply with quote

I've also seen willy nilly as will-he nill-he

 
zomgmouse
746759.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:30 pm Reply with quote

When I checked etymonline it gave that as a variant, too.

 
Ian Dunn
757133.  Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:30 am Reply with quote

Just come across another interesting enter from "Schott's Vocab". Something for Series Z.

zabernism - "The misuse of military power or authority; bullying, aggression."

 
dr bartolo
757937.  Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:05 pm Reply with quote

deaviating slightly away from english, this post *
post tells us about the origin of the german for gelding, wallach
now, my question is, the french & italians call their castrated horses hongre- where does that come from?

*dosent work- this is where it leads tohttp://www.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=20003&start=0

 
Ian Dunn
763478.  Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:04 am Reply with quote

This is a brilliant word, again from Schott's Vocab.

quomodocunquizing - That makes money in any possible way.

 
Ian Dunn
777819.  Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:09 am Reply with quote

This word probably best describes the people posting here: logomaniac - one who is insanely interested in words.

Source

 
dr bartolo
799873.  Sun Mar 27, 2011 8:33 am Reply with quote

Not exactly english, but the chinese have the phrase

回光返照
(huiguang fanzhao)
It means a sudden apparent recovery of a sickness, or grave injury , that is followed by death.

An excellent example of this may me found in the finale of the opera la traviata when Violetta says that the pain of the ilness has disappeared, only to drop dead shortly afterwards.

 
tetsabb
804724.  Sat Apr 09, 2011 11:21 pm Reply with quote

Am I allowed to post one of my silly thoughts here?

A new word

Infartuation What is practised by someone who really the smell of their own guffage

 
potherca
847972.  Sun Sep 18, 2011 3:24 pm Reply with quote

dr bartolo wrote:
Not exactly english, but the chinese have the phrase

回光返照
(huiguang fanzhao)
It means a sudden apparent recovery of a sickness, or grave injury , that is followed by death.

An excellent example of this may me found in the finale of the opera la traviata when Violetta says that the pain of the ilness has disappeared, only to drop dead shortly afterwards.


That very much reminds me of a "dead cat bounce" on the stock market. (a small, brief recovery in the price of a declining stock). I wonder if they are related in origin?

 
Ian Dunn
1099272.  Sun Oct 26, 2014 4:50 am Reply with quote

I know this is thread is over three years old without a post in it, but I thought it worthy to mention a new word to enter the Collins, which is acutally a word imported from Japan:

Quote:
Kawaii: "Japanese artistic and cultural style that emphasises the quality of cuteness, using bright colours and characters with a childlike appearance."


As someone who goes to quite a few anime conventions I can tell you that there is a big fondness both in Japan and increasingly over here to make just about anything cute.

Source: BBC Newsbeat

 
14-11-2014
1145315.  Fri Aug 14, 2015 8:54 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Quote:
It means a sudden apparent recovery of a sickness, or grave injury , that is followed by death.

An excellent example of this may me found in the finale of the opera la traviata when Violetta says that the pain of the ilness has disappeared, only to drop dead shortly afterwards.

That very much reminds me of a "dead cat bounce" on the stock market. (a small, brief recovery in the price of a declining stock). I wonder if they are related in origin?

Certainly not. Technical analysts don't analyse nor predict anything. They'll look back, notice something that's supposed to be their bouncing cat, and tell you what could happen. Their open-ended story will be non-committal, so death typically is just one of many possible options. It's also impossible to promise or predict death by using nothing but a last price.

Other analysts won't look at dead cats, because dead cats won't have an investment grade. Studying dead cats is a waste of time. Even if it's not a waste of time, then analysts tend to not exclude all other possibilities.

According to Wikipedia the bouncing dead cat was introduced by jounalists, and that's probably right. It's a good way to describe an unfounded steep recovery, without having to explain that the cat is dead. But journalists don't predict death. At best they'll mention that the price will most likely continue to decline, but without guaranteeing that the cat is dead.

thestreet.com wrote:
Trade-Ideas LLC identified Eldorado Gold ( EGO) as a "dead cat bounce" (down big yesterday but up big today) candidate.

It's a candidate. Trade-Ideas has no idea if Eldorado Gold is a dead cat. This is a typical non-committal, meaningless nomination of technical analysts, unlike the plot of the opera. The nomination is used to suggest that it's a prediction, but the lazy historians don't have a clue. It could be a dead cat, it could be a healthy elephant. The opera guarantees death.

 
katherine.lavender
1154419.  Tue Oct 20, 2015 9:14 am Reply with quote

Sorry to interrupt dead cats bouncing (I wonder what Schrödinger would have to say about that?) but I have an etymology fact I love and thought this was the place for it.

You used to be able to "reck" as well as be reckless, and if you were happy (as happy as a grunting, rootling pig in fact!) you could be "gruntled" instead of disgruntled.

Just two examples of paired antonyms where one word has fallen by the wayside, out of disuse. Anyone know any others? Interesting that we're more often disgruntled than gruntled - is that an essential miserable pessimism on the part of English language?

I also wanted to know - if you can be overwhelmed and underwhelmed, can you ever just be whelmed? What is whelm?

 
Strawberry
1154421.  Tue Oct 20, 2015 9:18 am Reply with quote

katherine.lavender wrote:
Sorry to interrupt dead cats bouncing (I wonder what Schrödinger would have to say about that?) but I have an etymology fact I love and thought this was the place for it.

You used to be able to "reck" as well as be reckless, and if you were happy (as happy as a grunting, rootling pig in fact!) you could be "gruntled" instead of disgruntled.

Just two examples of paired antonyms where one word has fallen by the wayside, out of disuse. Anyone know any others? Interesting that we're more often disgruntled than gruntled - is that an essential miserable pessimism on the part of English language?

I also wanted to know - if you can be overwhelmed and underwhelmed, can you ever just be whelmed? What is whelm?


A couple of years ago, I went to a word-related talk. And I asked the question that you asked. I was told that a whelm is a wave. And that people used to say whelmed but this stopped because of how language changes.

 
katherine.lavender
1154422.  Tue Oct 20, 2015 9:21 am Reply with quote

Thanks! Just found this actually, which is interesting: http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-whe1.htm

So if whelm = wave, or capsizing, or being overturned... isn't being overwhelmed exactly the same as being whelmed?

 

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