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QI Words and Etymology

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Efros
746150.  Fri Sep 24, 2010 3:34 pm Reply with quote

Queuetopia looks fine to me, qutopia seems to be used by quizzing types.

Time says "Some of Attlee's followers called it Socialism; some called it "fair shares for all"; some called it the welfare state. Winston Churchill last week scornfully snarled out another name for it: "Queuetopia." Spendthrift's End?"

 
Zebra57
746184.  Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:26 pm Reply with quote

The origin of the word Quiz is often attributed to a bet made by a Dubliner Richard Daly. He claimed that in two days he could make up a word which had no meaning and that the good people of Dublin would accept it.

However the word already appeared in use to described a type of toy and also a strange type of person.

 
dr bartolo
746400.  Sat Sep 25, 2010 12:59 pm Reply with quote

or perhaps from a contraction of que es?

 
Spud McLaren
746403.  Sat Sep 25, 2010 1:04 pm Reply with quote

dr bartolo wrote:
or perhaps from a contraction of que es?
I see - what is it?, or ...a whatsit.

 
zomgmouse
746469.  Sat Sep 25, 2010 10:38 pm Reply with quote

While reading Moby Dick, I found out that "willy-nilly" comes from "will I nill I", roughly meaning "indecisive".
Also that "frenzy" used to be spelled "phrensy".

 
Bondee
746612.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 8:46 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
Bondee wrote:
Ian Dunn wrote:
Qutopia - coined by Winston Churchill. A qutopia is a communist country were the people have to que endlessly for everything.


Que?


Sorry, I'm guessing it is "cutopia".


Sorry, I was taking the piss. That was a Manuel-esque "Que?" cos you left a couple of letters out of queue.

 
Jenny
746727.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 5:48 pm Reply with quote

I've also seen willy nilly as will-he nill-he

 
zomgmouse
746759.  Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:30 pm Reply with quote

When I checked etymonline it gave that as a variant, too.

 
Ian Dunn
757133.  Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:30 am Reply with quote

Just come across another interesting enter from "Schott's Vocab". Something for Series Z.

zabernism - "The misuse of military power or authority; bullying, aggression."

 
dr bartolo
757937.  Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:05 pm Reply with quote

deaviating slightly away from english, this post *
post tells us about the origin of the german for gelding, wallach
now, my question is, the french & italians call their castrated horses hongre- where does that come from?

*dosent work- this is where it leads tohttp://www.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=20003&start=0

 
Ian Dunn
763478.  Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:04 am Reply with quote

This is a brilliant word, again from Schott's Vocab.

quomodocunquizing - That makes money in any possible way.

 
Ian Dunn
777819.  Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:09 am Reply with quote

This word probably best describes the people posting here: logomaniac - one who is insanely interested in words.

Source

 
dr bartolo
799873.  Sun Mar 27, 2011 8:33 am Reply with quote

Not exactly english, but the chinese have the phrase

回光返照
(huiguang fanzhao)
It means a sudden apparent recovery of a sickness, or grave injury , that is followed by death.

An excellent example of this may me found in the finale of the opera la traviata when Violetta says that the pain of the ilness has disappeared, only to drop dead shortly afterwards.

 
tetsabb
804724.  Sat Apr 09, 2011 11:21 pm Reply with quote

Am I allowed to post one of my silly thoughts here?

A new word

Infartuation What is practised by someone who really the smell of their own guffage

 
potherca
847972.  Sun Sep 18, 2011 3:24 pm Reply with quote

dr bartolo wrote:
Not exactly english, but the chinese have the phrase

回光返照
(huiguang fanzhao)
It means a sudden apparent recovery of a sickness, or grave injury , that is followed by death.

An excellent example of this may me found in the finale of the opera la traviata when Violetta says that the pain of the ilness has disappeared, only to drop dead shortly afterwards.


That very much reminds me of a "dead cat bounce" on the stock market. (a small, brief recovery in the price of a declining stock). I wonder if they are related in origin?

 

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