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Dog Guides

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serenitydah
672964.  Fri Feb 19, 2010 1:47 pm Reply with quote

Well the information about dog's ability (or lack of ability) to see color was accurate, the description of the process of a dog guide and a blind human crossing the street was too funny. My blind wife almost urinated on herself laughing. She has had a dog guide for over 4 years, and well hearing is involved in the crossing of the street - it is the HUMAN's hearing. The dog does NOT make the decision on when to cross. The dog LOOKS and can warn of dangers, but the human is in charge.

Makes me wonder about the rest of the facts in the book.

 
AlmondFacialBar
672975.  Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:32 pm Reply with quote

so can you explain what actually happens? cos methinks that would be pretty interesting...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
serenitydah
672981.  Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:49 pm Reply with quote

My wife could do a better job, but here goes.

The real misconception is that the dog is in change at any point in the process. The dog's job is to lookout for street or floor level obstacles - pot holes, curbs, chairs, etc. The human is in charge of direction and knowing where the team is at all times. (and it really is a team)

Specifically crossing the street goes like this:

* the dog stops at the curb
* the human acknowledges to the dog that they know it is a curb (this is done with a foot tap)
* the human listens for traffic, traffic lights and human traffic to determine when it is clear to go
* while the human listens, the dog is looking both ways (it was freaky the first time I saw it)
* the human gives the command to go
* the dog can disobey, if the dog senses danger (it is called intelligently disobeying or selective disobedience)
* the dog stops at the curb on the other side, putting the front 2 paws on the curb (the human can feel the elevation change in the harness)
* the human tells the dog to go
* and they both step onto the other side.

 
AlmondFacialBar
672984.  Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:54 pm Reply with quote

ah, right! :-) thanks, ever knew any of that.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Jenny
673235.  Sat Feb 20, 2010 1:00 pm Reply with quote

That's fascinating - thanks serenitydah and welcome to the QI forums :-)

 
VaultAir
676036.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 5:12 am Reply with quote

Very QI indeed. Thanks, Serenitydah.

 
Izzardesque
676040.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 5:24 am Reply with quote

Are there any instances of other animals trained to act the same as dogs?

 
AlmondFacialBar
676069.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 6:28 am Reply with quote

there are horses guides for the blind (tiny little ponies) and assistance monkeys for people with physical disabilities.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Izzardesque
676134.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 8:19 am Reply with quote

I think I'd want a tiger or a lion

 
sandman2000k
676173.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:37 am Reply with quote

i alwaoys wondered how that worked

thanks

 
Sadurian Mike
676365.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 5:13 pm Reply with quote

Guide-ferrets for the blind and overweight. A combined seeing-eye companion and personal trainer.

 
nitwit02
676429.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:28 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Are there any instances of other animals trained to act the same as dogs?





I'm surprised that no one has considered training cats for this purpose.

 
Bondee
676884.  Sun Feb 28, 2010 11:36 am Reply with quote

serenitydah wrote:
* the human acknowledges to the dog that they know it is a curb (this is done with a foot tap)


When you say "foot tap", do they tap their foot on the ground or give the dog a little nudge?

 
Izzardesque
677299.  Mon Mar 01, 2010 12:27 pm Reply with quote

nitwit02 wrote:
Quote:
Are there any instances of other animals trained to act the same as dogs?





I'm surprised that no one has considered training cats for this purpose.


I don't think they'd listen!

 

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