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Germany - Schnitzel with Noodles

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AlmondFacialBar
659687.  Wed Jan 20, 2010 10:25 am Reply with quote

masterfroggy wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:
, i've never been to india but i still make one hell of a good curry, after all one thing has little or nothing to do with the other. so, again,
How do you know? Without tasting a proper Indian curry, how do you know the thing you call curry, really is?
Iíve never had Wiener Schnitzel, but I have had escalope of veal, are they not the same?

The OP said Stephen was wrong and the OP was proved wrong, so in what way is my first comment not relevant, other than in your opinion.


your comment is not relevant because the lyricists ethnicity and citizenship have absolutely no bearing on the fact that he needed a rhyme for strudel. he could have written the exact same song with the exact same rhymes and the exact same culinary inaccuracies if he'd been an afghan muslim, a tibetan monk or an irish catholic. or indeed a german or austrian common or garden every day kind of guy, because all he wanted is find a rhyme for strudel.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
mckeonj
659715.  Wed Jan 20, 2010 11:40 am Reply with quote

AFB: Have you tried boxty yet? It's delicious, but has no rhyme in English or Irish.

 
masterfroggy
659718.  Wed Jan 20, 2010 11:43 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
masterfroggy wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:
, i've never been to india but i still make one hell of a good curry, after all one thing has little or nothing to do with the other. so, again,
How do you know? Without tasting a proper Indian curry, how do you know the thing you call curry, really is?
Iíve never had Wiener Schnitzel, but I have had escalope of veal, are they not the same?

The OP said Stephen was wrong and the OP was proved wrong, so in what way is my first comment not relevant, other than in your opinion.


your comment is not relevant because the lyricists ethnicity and citizenship have absolutely no bearing on the fact that he needed a rhyme for strudel. he could have written the exact same song with the exact same rhymes and the exact same culinary inaccuracies if he'd been an afghan muslim, a tibetan monk or an irish catholic. or indeed a german or austrian common or garden every day kind of guy, because all he wanted is find a rhyme for strudel.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar



ĎCould haveí, completely meaningless, Iím struggling too work out what it is about my posing about his ethnicity or place of birth to which you are objecting so fervently.
Am I mistaken, was he not an American? of German Jewish stock? Is there something within that linked phrase to which you object?

For you other point, his ethnicity and citizenship is very much reflected in the songs he wrote, we are, after all, the sum of our collective experiences.

 
suze
659755.  Wed Jan 20, 2010 12:57 pm Reply with quote

BigBry wrote:
What I should have been complaining about is that The Sound of Music is set in Austria so has no place in a "G - for Germany" program in the first place!


But The Sound of Music was set during the period of AnschluŖ (the union of Austria and Germany which lasted from 1938 until 1945). So it was in Germany at the time!

 
eggshaped
659782.  Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:43 pm Reply with quote

Another correspondent offers this:

Quote:
You were quite right in the German programme to say that schnitzel would not be served with noodles, but it might come with knoedeln (pardon the lack of umlaut) or Bavarian dumplings. A bad translation or transliteration of this may be the source of Hammerstein's lyric.


We knew about spštzle at the time of recording, but still felt that as a traditional accompaniment (especially in the Salzburg area of Austria) noodles would be unusual.

As suze says, the question may have been mostly about Austria, but the area was part of Germany at the time - and besides, part of the question was to do with the idea that when escaping over the border from Salzburg one would find oneself close to Hitler's residence in Germany - so we felt that it was a reasonable fit.

 
AlmondFacialBar
659807.  Wed Jan 20, 2010 2:51 pm Reply with quote

masterfroggy wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:
masterfroggy wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:
, i've never been to india but i still make one hell of a good curry, after all one thing has little or nothing to do with the other. so, again,
How do you know? Without tasting a proper Indian curry, how do you know the thing you call curry, really is?
Iíve never had Wiener Schnitzel, but I have had escalope of veal, are they not the same?

The OP said Stephen was wrong and the OP was proved wrong, so in what way is my first comment not relevant, other than in your opinion.


your comment is not relevant because the lyricists ethnicity and citizenship have absolutely no bearing on the fact that he needed a rhyme for strudel. he could have written the exact same song with the exact same rhymes and the exact same culinary inaccuracies if he'd been an afghan muslim, a tibetan monk or an irish catholic. or indeed a german or austrian common or garden every day kind of guy, because all he wanted is find a rhyme for strudel.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar



ĎCould haveí, completely meaningless, Iím struggling too work out what it is about my posing about his ethnicity or place of birth to which you are objecting so fervently.
Am I mistaken, was he not an American? of German Jewish stock? Is there something within that linked phrase to which you object?

For you other point, his ethnicity and citizenship is very much reflected in the songs he wrote, we are, after all, the sum of our collective experiences.


and this is where i leave this debate. if you really think it's acceptable to accuse people of anti-semitism that's your own funeral, but allow me not attend it.

 
nitwit02
660391.  Thu Jan 21, 2010 10:25 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Iíve never had Wiener Schnitzel, but I have had escalope of veal, are they not the same?



Oh no, not, "Veal Meet Again ..."

 
hh
671400.  Tue Feb 16, 2010 8:27 am Reply with quote

About:
Quote:
Schnitzel is almost never served with noodles. It might be occasionally now, simply because of the song, but it basically rhymes with strudels, so letís be honest, thatís, thatís why


Schnitzel is indeed sometimes served with noodles and this has nothing to do with the film really.

Traditionally "Wiener Schnitzel" is served with lingonberry and potatoes roasted in parsley and butter (or chips and ketchup nowadays) but never with noodles (at least I have never witnessed such an attrocity :). But schnitzel overall refers to a thin slice of meat which is roasted. If used in this sense then there are some recipes for which noodles are a common side dish, e.g. J"agerschnitzel (with mushroom sauce and noodles) or Piccata alla Milanese, sometimes called Mail"ander Schnitzel (with a crust of parmesan and bread crumbs served on noddles with tomato sauce).

 
Zebra57
671509.  Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:33 pm Reply with quote

Anyone who has visited the Salzburg Region will have seen/heard the coach loads of Sound of Music fans visiting the various scenes from the film. I would be amazed if an enterprising restaurant in the area does not put on the tourist menu "Schnitzel with Noodles".

Tourist expectations can be QI. In India hotels are employing chefs trained in the UK to provide tourists with the "Indian" food they expect. In Britain the majority of "Indian" restaurants are run by people whose families originate from Bangladesh. Chicken Tikka Masala is as British as Roast Beef and claimed to have been invented in Glasgow while the Balti first appeared in Birmingham (contrary to speculative claims from Newcastle )

Chinese establishments are seeking European trained chefs to cook "Chinese" food which tourists expect. Similarly many popular dishes from the local chinese take away are provided for US/European tastes. Whether chop suey was first served in Chicago is open to speculation.

 
AlmondFacialBar
671604.  Tue Feb 16, 2010 3:51 pm Reply with quote

Zebra57 wrote:
Whether chop suey was first served in Chicago is open to speculation.


actually san francisco is the place this one is usually attributed to, and it's long been disregarded as a myth (in, amongst other places, the book of general ignorance). chop suey was mentioned in cantonese writings before any chinese person ever came to america. i'd give you, however, that what's served as chop suey in most european and american restaurants is probably about as chinese as wiener schnitzel, but then we had that...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Teddie5000
922755.  Sun Jul 08, 2012 5:35 pm Reply with quote

((Curry is an English dish not Indian. This is why it is served in National Trust cafes and Lasagne is not!))

Prior to the unification of Germany, there were only German states, of which Austria was one. It is therefore acceptable to consider Austria to be part of Germany in certain contexts, especially culturally, which includes food.

I worked in a Bavarian town near the Austrian border after I graduated and they only served Schitzel with Noodles. The noodles were vile, made out of a batter dripped into boiling water and had the texture of soggy cornflakes.

In short, they are disgusting. Never be stupid enough to order them!

 
alai
922757.  Sun Jul 08, 2012 5:55 pm Reply with quote

Teddie5000 wrote:
Prior to the unification of Germany, there were only German states, of which Austria was one. It is therefore acceptable to consider Austria to be part of Germany in certain contexts, especially culturally, which includes food.

There have been various "unifications" of Germany, pretty much starting right after it "broke up" (Napoleon abolishing the Holy Roman Empire, to a reasonable first approximation). All the same, Austria hasn't been a political part of whichever then-topical political entity had "German(y)" in its title for the considerable majority of the past 200 years or so...

Quote:
I worked in a Bavarian town near the Austrian border after I graduated and they only served Schitzel with Noodles. The noodles were vile, made out of a batter dripped into boiling water and had the texture of soggy cornflakes.

Conversely to the Austrian case... I was being given a lightning tour of part of Germany by a friend of mine, who latterly suggested that we keep an eye out for someplace to eat, "maybe something traditionally German?" We then whizzed at high speed past someplace very trad-looking indeed, without any suggestion of any deceleration, much less braking, on his part. "What about--?" "I said German, not Bavarian!"

 
Jenny
922874.  Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:07 am Reply with quote

Teddie5000 wrote:

In short, they are disgusting. Never be stupid enough to order them!


What, you mean Julie Andrews had bad taste? Say it ain't so!

Welcome Teddie :-)

 
Spud McLaren
922915.  Mon Jul 09, 2012 1:45 pm Reply with quote

Teddie5000 wrote:
The noodles were vile, made out of a batter dripped into boiling water and had the texture of soggy cornflakes.

In short, they are disgusting. Never be stupid enough to order them!
Ah -

- nokedli (if you're Hungarian)?

 
Traveller69
923706.  Fri Jul 13, 2012 4:25 am Reply with quote

ďSchnitzel is almost never served with noodles. It might be occasionally now, simply because of the song, but it basically rhymes with strudels, so letís be honest, thatís, thatís whyĒ

No, that's not why. Maria sang it because it is one of her favourite things :P

So although the Schnitzel is almost never served with noodles, that was just the way Maria likes it the most.

 

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