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Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia

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wdyhollywood
659026.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:40 am Reply with quote

Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia... the irony of it's meaning is sublime

 
masterfroggy
659044.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:58 am Reply with quote

wdyhollywood wrote:
Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia... the irony of it's meaning is sublime

It would be were it not misspelt.
Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia
Hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia

 
wdyhollywood
659059.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:07 am Reply with quote

Ahhh the downside of using dictionary.com for spelling

 
Neotenic
659078.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:32 am Reply with quote

I think it's a word that has been deliberately constructed to be funny (although whether or not it has been successful I will leave to your discretion), but has no real meaning or application.

Not least because a fear of words is 'logophobia', and there's no 'logo', or any variation of that within the compound word.

I'm no cunning linguist, but I would have thought that 'megalogophobia' would probably be closer to the mark.

 
wdyhollywood
659119.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:47 am Reply with quote

Neotenic wrote:
I think it's a word that has been deliberately constructed to be funny (although whether or not it has been successful I will leave to your discretion), but has no real meaning or application.

Not least because a fear of words is 'logophobia', and there's no 'logo', or any variation of that within the compound word.

I'm no cunning linguist, but I would have thought that 'megalogophobia' would probably be closer to the mark.


It does seem to be quite genuine, Sesquipedalophobia is the other version aparently but I can't seem to find any documentation to say that it was created as either a joke or for deliberate irony.
However i believe that the phobia was first coined in America

 
exnihilo
659197.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:54 pm Reply with quote

The OUP (USA) makes it quite clear it's a "stunt word". It is a cobbled together nonsense of a word, taking perfectly valid words and ramming them together with no reference to their actual meaning and then having an arbitrary meaning nailed on to the whole. And another reference from The Times which loses some credibility for citing the OED's principle (sic) lexicographer.

 
Neotenic
659257.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 3:13 pm Reply with quote

To comment on that would be against my principals.

 
Neotenic
659378.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:49 pm Reply with quote

Quote:

The OUP (USA) makes it quite clear it's a "stunt word"


Like 'defenestration', yes?

;-)

 
zomgmouse
659398.  Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:36 pm Reply with quote

A friend informed me recently that the word "thusly" is just such a "stunt" word, created to ridicule hypercorrective grammarians believing that "thus" cannot be used adverbially, which, it turns out, it can.

 
Zarafa
676314.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 2:41 pm Reply with quote

This somehow seemed apt.

"The Grammarian and the Dervish", from Tales of the Dervishes, ed. Idries Shah

Quote:
One dark night a dervish was passing a dry well when he heard a cry for help from below. 'What is the matter?' he called down.

'I am a grammarian, and I have unfortunately fallen, due to my ignorance of the path, into this deep well, in which I am now all but immobilized,' responded the other.

'Hold, friend, and I'll fetch a ladder and a rope,' said the dervish.

'One moment, please!' said the grammarian. 'Your grammar and diction are faulty; be good enough to amend them.'

'If that is so much more important than the essentials,' shouted the dervish, 'you had best stay where you are until I have learned to speak properly.'

And he went his way.


Edit: I omitted the word 'passing' the first time around...I suppose there could be some deep mystical meaning in the phrase "One dark night a dervish was a dry well," but not in this story!

 
Jenny
676437.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:58 pm Reply with quote

I know that grammarian got out of the well somehow - at any rate, his manner of speaking bears a strong resemblance to that of some of our regular posters.

 
Neuromancer
837768.  Wed Aug 10, 2011 6:29 pm Reply with quote

Neotenic wrote:
I think it's a word that has been deliberately constructed to be funny (although whether or not it has been successful I will leave to your discretion), but has no real meaning or application.

Not least because a fear of words is 'logophobia', and there's no 'logo', or any variation of that within the compound word.

I'm no cunning linguist, but I would have thought that 'megalogophobia' would probably be closer to the mark.


Is this not another example of the common mixing of latin and greek words, or part thereof? Hippopoto- (Greek) monstro- (latin) sesqui- (latin) pedalio- (latin) phobia (greek). Such mixings always produce problems - such as the well known plurification of octopus (greek) to octopi (latin) instead of octopodes (greek).

 
Jenny
837870.  Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:04 am Reply with quote

Good point. We like a good point around here - welcome Neuromancer :-)

 
samivel
837912.  Thu Aug 11, 2011 10:48 am Reply with quote

 
CB27
837921.  Thu Aug 11, 2011 11:01 am Reply with quote

Looks like a scotch egg talking to a coxinha :)

I'm peckish now...

 

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