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Words with no rhymes

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Spud McLaren
732478.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 1:01 pm Reply with quote

For me, doth rhymes with azimuth.

 
suze
732506.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 4:02 pm Reply with quote

Actually, so it does for me. Your doth and azimuth won't be identical to mine, what with me being from Vancouver and you from the English Midlands, but for both of us they rhyme.

Do they for everyone, though? I suspect that many would pronounce azimuth with a schwa in the final syllable (so that that final syllable would be the same as that of Portsmouth, as usually pronounced). Or do others do what Spud and I appear to do, and have the final vowel the same as that of hut?

While we are on azimuth, what is the first vowel? It's not a word that I've spoken very many times (well OK, probably never until just now), but I think that I'd pronounce the first syllable to rhyme with haze. Am I right in thinking that British people would pronounce the first syllable to rhyme with has?

 
samivel
732520.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 5:43 pm Reply with quote

According to the pronunciation example provided on Wiki, at least one North American rhymes the first syllable with has.

And, while I'm in no way representative of the whole of British people, so do I. And the last syllable does indeed contain a schwa for me as well. So does doth.

 
Jenny
732524.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 5:48 pm Reply with quote

Poetry.

 
Posital
732527.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 5:55 pm Reply with quote

Fir tree?

As in: Fir tree in motion...

 
Jenny
732528.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 5:56 pm Reply with quote

A half-rhyme at best :-)

There is a rhyme for poem - phloem (as in xylem and phloem) but I'm not sure I'd care to make a work of literature out of it.

 
Efros
732533.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 6:40 pm Reply with quote

There has to be a poetry loving/writing botanist somewhere in the world. Chemistry has Roald Hoffman Nobel prize winner and poet.

 
Jenny
732536.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 6:50 pm Reply with quote

The trouble with xylem and phloem
is they're hard to get into a poem.

 
Efros
732538.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 6:52 pm Reply with quote

ta da!

found this which is epic! He even gets phlogistic in there.

 
Sparkyweasel
732541.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 7:18 pm Reply with quote

WordLover wrote:
. . . unrhymable words . . . e.g.

culm



. . . rhymes with mulm, the muck that accumulates at the bottom of an aquarium.

 
ali
732542.  Mon Aug 09, 2010 7:19 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
The trouble with xylem and phloem
is they're hard to get into a poem.


The poem about phloem
Was inchoate.
So the poet
Wrote a proem.

 

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