View previous topic | View next topic

Cows aren't worshipped

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

thedrew
654721.  Thu Jan 07, 2010 5:59 pm Reply with quote

I would define those words almost oppositely. Sacred means revered, honored, and respected, but Holy means it posesses some element of Godliness. Interesting how these words can be confused.

I agree, revered is a better distinction.

 
Davini994
654755.  Thu Jan 07, 2010 10:01 pm Reply with quote

...which is why dictionaries are so important!

 
MinervaMoon
654763.  Thu Jan 07, 2010 10:27 pm Reply with quote

The quote from the show was:
Quote:
There are no sacred cows in India. The term "sacred" is a Christian one; doesn't really apply to India. Even if it did, it wouldn't apply to cows. There are no cow deities, cow icons, cow statues, and no temples to cows. Cows are one of the few animals that are not the object of worship in India.

Given that, we can better discuss evidence for and against what was actually said.

 
bobwilson
654766.  Thu Jan 07, 2010 10:33 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
I have a friend from India (Bengali Hindu) at work and she said Steven Fry was wrong to say cows weren't sacred or not worshipped.


And equally - being from the relevant region does not make the person omniscient.

 
Posital
655153.  Fri Jan 08, 2010 4:09 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Quote:
I have a friend from India (Bengali Hindu) at work and she said Steven Fry was wrong to say cows weren't sacred or not worshipped.


And equally - being from the relevant region does not make the person omniscient.
Perhaps region-iscient...

 
VaultAir
675617.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 6:50 am Reply with quote

MinervaMoon wrote:
Cows are one of the few animals that are not the object of worship in India.

Given that, we can better discuss evidence for and against what was actually said.[/quote]

There are serious problems with such contentions. Especially when you go back to a reading of the Rig Veda, and the huge sacrifices which involved the sacrifice of a large number of bovine animals, cows and bufaloes. Tangentially, there was also the Ashvameda sacrifice, which kings used to perform mostly before battles and involved the slaughter of a great number of horses.

On the 12th day of the 12th month of the Hindu calendar, a cow ritual is performed in Jodhpur palace, in the western Indian state of Rajasthan. Its a religious ceremony, whether you want to consider it sacred or worship is upto you.

There are also bull temples, which do have icons, like the Mahabalipuram temple to Shiva in South India. It is repeated many times in the Mahabharata that cows represent sacrifice.

The important point to keep in mind is because of the system of social stratification that operated in India (or more properly the subcontinental region) meant that the Bhramins (priestly caste0 had a monopoly on the conducting of sacrifices. So when religions like buddhism and jainism came to surface, they protected the cow as a valuable symbol of wealth because of all that it produced. This mightily pleased the trader caste, and is a fairly significant reason in accounting for the great popularity that these religions, were able to command.

The cow is considered the mother of the world, so to speak, in Hindu mythology. Symbolism is much more important here than in Western religions.

 
Zebra57
675829.  Thu Feb 25, 2010 2:26 pm Reply with quote

True there are not cow dieties in the Hindu religion but there have been in other religions. As for the discussion between holy and sacred I quote the esteemed OED.

The OED says this:

holy

• adjective (holier, holiest) 1 dedicated to God or a religious purpose. 2 morally and spiritually excellent and to be revered.

— ORIGIN Old English, related to WHOLE.

sacred
/saykrid/

• adjective 1 connected with a deity and so deserving veneration; holy. 2 (of a text) embodying the doctrines of a religion. 3 religious rather than secular.

— DERIVATIVES sacredly adverb sacredness noun.

— ORIGIN from Latin sacrare ‘consecrate’, from sacer ‘holy’.

Essentially one of the same

 
Posital
676006.  Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:02 am Reply with quote

Sorry = dedicated and connected aren't the same.

(Can someone provide a venn diagram?)

Even if their latin origin is the same.

 
Fleabag
760235.  Sun Nov 14, 2010 7:58 pm Reply with quote

I have devout Hindu friends in India, and the way it was described by them is that the cow is revered because it serves humans, through labour and provision of milk, and so earns their respect and the right to not end up on someone's plate. The principle applies to other animals, but none more than the cow.

 
Ion Zone
760438.  Mon Nov 15, 2010 5:30 pm Reply with quote

Cows that haven't been bred to the horrible standards of Western culture are (supposedly) better steeds than horses. I haven't ridden one, so I can't say, but they were one of the first domestic animals to be ridden upon (if not the first). They, supposedly, have a far better temperament. Unfortunately I have lost my source for this, but I think it has been mentioned before on here.

The lazy farmer's guide to cow-riding

In Japan, deer have been sacred (or holy) to the Shinto faith since . Deer in Japan are usually very tame and get fed rice (I think) crackers and other treats, thought the government now encourages people to hunt them. They are still protected in a lot of Japan and are looked after by shrines and others. (Best link I can find)

Deer are\have been revered in very many countries. Link

 
Alfred E Neuman
760577.  Tue Nov 16, 2010 2:33 pm Reply with quote

Ion Zone wrote:
Cows that haven't been bred to the horrible standards of Western culture are (supposedly) better steeds than horses.


That's a load of bull.

 
Ion Zone
760665.  Tue Nov 16, 2010 6:25 pm Reply with quote

It is perfectly true that cows used to be ridden. And when I say 'better' I mean from the point of view of temperament and strength. I cannot comment on speed as they have never been bred for it, and I cannot be definite on anything but the 'being ridden' part as I have lost my source.

 
Spud McLaren
760668.  Tue Nov 16, 2010 6:34 pm Reply with quote

I think Alfred was employing a pun there, Ion.

 
Akhil
905569.  Mon Apr 30, 2012 3:24 pm Reply with quote

Please refer to the following link, Kamdhenu is said to be the 'mother of all cows' and is a goddess, now I don't know if every goddess is worshiped actively or not but I suspect they are and the researchers got it wrong on this one.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamadhenu

 
Jenny
905753.  Tue May 01, 2012 10:21 am Reply with quote

Thanks Akhil, and welcome to the QI forums :-)

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group