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JumpingJack
30093.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 4:27 am Reply with quote

NINEPENCE n. A filver coin valued at nine-pence.

That's QI.

Did anyone know they used to have ninepenny coins?

 
JumpingJack
30094.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 4:29 am Reply with quote

NIPPLE n. The teat; the dug; that which the fucking young take into their mouths.

 
Icarus
30106.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 5:58 am Reply with quote

Quote:
After Decimal Day, the value of one penny was therefore different from its pre-decimalisation value. For the first few years after 1971, the new type of penny was commonly referred to as a "new penny". Coins for denominations of ½p, 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p and 50p all bore the name NEW PENCE (or NEW PENNY) until 1982, when the inscription changed to HALF PENNY, ONE PENNY, TWO PENCE, FIVE PENCE and so on. The old 1/ and 2/ coins were equivalent in value to 5p and 10p respectively, and as such these coins remained valid within the decimal system until the 5p and 10p coins were each later replaced with smaller versions in the early 1990s.


The .5p?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_sterling

 
Icarus
30108.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 6:05 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Denominations of pre-decimal coins and their years of production
Note that the value of some coins fluctuated at different times in their history, particularly in the reigns of James I and Charles I. The value of a Guinea fluctuated between 20 and 30 shillings before being fixed at 21 shillings in December 1717.
Note that these are denominations of British, or earlier English, coins – Scottish coins had different values.
Five Guineas (originally 100/- [£5], later 105/- [£5.25]) 1668-1753.
Five Pounds (100/- [£5]) (Gold) 1826-1990.
Triple Unite (60/- [£3]) 1642-1644.
Fifty Shillings (50/- [£2.5]) 1656.
Two Guineas (42/- [£2.1]) 1664-1753.
Two Pounds (40/- [£2]) 1823-1937.
Rose Ryal (30/- [£1.5]) 1604-1625.
Guinea (21/- [£1.05]) 1663-1799, 1813
Broad (20/- [£1]) 1656.
Sovereign (20/- [£1]) 1489-1604; 1817-1914, since 1914 a bullion coin.
Laurel (20/- [£1]) 1619-1644?
Unite (20/- [£1]) 1604-1619; 1649-1662.
Spur Ryal (15/- [£0.75]) 1604-1625.
Half Guinea (10/6 [£0.525]) 1669-1813.
Half Sovereign (10/- [£0.5]) 1544-1553; 1603-1604; 1817-1937, since 1980 a bullion coin.
Double Crown (10/- [£0.5]) 1604-1619; 1625-1662.
Halfpound (10/- [£0.5]) 1559-1602; 1642-4
Half Unite (10/- [£0.5]) 1642-3.
Half Laurel (10/- [£0.5]) 1619-1625.
Rose Noble or Ryal (10/- [£0.5], 15/- [£0.75] from 1553) 1464-1470, 1487, 1553-1603.
Third Guinea (7/- [£0.35]) 1797-1813.
Noble (6/8 [£0.3333], raised to 8/4 [£0.4167] in 1464) 1344-1464.
Angel (6/8 [£0.3333]) 1461-1643.
Florin or Double Leopard (6/- [£0.3]) 1344. Demonetised within 1 year.
Quarter Guinea (5/3 [£0.2625]) 1718, 1762.
Crown (5/- [£0.25]) 1526-1965
Crown of the Rose (4/6 [£0.225]) 1526-1547.
Double Florin (4/- [£0.2]), 1887-1890.
Half Noble (3/4 [£0.1667], increased to 4/2 [£0.2083] in 1464); minted 1346-1438.
Half Angel (3/4 [£0.1667], later 5/6 [£0.275]), 1470-1619.
Half Florin or Leopard (3/- [£0.15]) 1344. Extremely rare.
Half Crown (2/6 [£0.125]), 1526-1969.
Quarter Angel (2/- [£0.1]), 1547-1600. Gold.
Florin (2/- [£0.1]), 1848-1970, circulated until 1993 as the old Ten Pence coin.
Twenty Pence (1/8 [£0.0833] - 2/- [£0.1]) 1257-1265. Gold. Undervalued for its metal content and extremely rare!
Quarter Noble (1/8 [£0.0833]), 1344-1470.
Quarter Florin or Helm (1/6 [£0.075]), 1344. Gold coin demonetised within 1 year.
Shilling (1/- [£0.05]), 1502-1970, circulated until 1990 as the old Five Pence coin.
Sixpence (6d [£0.025]), 1547-1970
Groat (4d [£0.0167]) silver 1279-1662, 1836-1862 (and thereafter only for Maundy)
Threepence (3d [£0.0125]), silver 1547-1945 (and thereafter only for Maundy), nickel-brass 1937-1970
Half Groat (2d [£0.0083]), 1351-1662
Twopence (2d [£0.0083]), silver (inc. Maundy) 1668- current; copper 1797-1798.
Three Halfpence (1½d [£0.0063]), 1561-1582, 1834-1870 *
Penny (1d [£0.0042]), 757-1970
Three Farthings (0.75d [£0.0031]), 1561-1582.
Halfpenny (0.5d [£0.0021]), 1272-1969
Farthing (0.25d [£0.0010]), c. 1200-1960
Half Farthing (0.125d [£0.0005]), 1828-1868 *
Third Farthing (0.08333d [£0.0003]) 1827-1913 *
Quarter Farthing (0.0625d [£0.0002]), 1839-1868 *
Scottish coin Bawbee (0.5d [£0.0021]), 1539-1697


No ninepence listed there...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_coinage

 
Icarus
30110.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 6:12 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Ninepence Nimble as ninepence. Silver ninepences were common till the year 1696, when all unmilled coin was called in. These ninepences were very pliable or nimble, and, being bent, were given as love tokens, the usual formula of presentation being To my love, from my love.


http://www.bootlegbooks.com/Reference/PhraseAndFable/data/891.html

From Brewer's Phrase and Fable...

 
JumpingJack
30112.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 6:18 am Reply with quote

Brilliant Icarus. Thanks.

 
Icarus
30115.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 6:25 am Reply with quote

This one caught my eye, because I really had never heard of it, and I'm a very minor numismaticist who's read three substantial histories of money and coinage.

But, if you search nincepence in Google, you'll find that it's the name of a currency trading site. A QI jewel for me.

 
Theophilus
30221.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 5:43 pm Reply with quote

Hey,
Don't wish to offend any Scots with my first post but....

Oats: a grain, which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.

Also,

Dull: not exhilarating, not delightful: as, to make dictionaries is dull work.

(Both Johnson)

 
Ciggywink
30222.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 5:50 pm Reply with quote

Theophilus - the second of those is an absolute gem!

 
Theophilus
30225.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 6:05 pm Reply with quote

Ha yeah, it goes well with his definition of a lexicographer:

a writer of dictionaries; a harmless drudge that busies himself in tracing the original, and detailing the signification of words.

 
laidbacklazyman
30253.  Wed Nov 09, 2005 3:11 am Reply with quote

Strangely I had someone hit on my site from a google search yesterday, searching for Garrick Alder. do you think there may be a "Desperately seeking Susan" type of film in the offing, Tom Cruise maybe playing GA?

 
mckeonj
40976.  Tue Dec 20, 2005 6:02 pm Reply with quote

English is the only language to have a Thesaurus, or to need it.
Roget's Thesaurus (=goldmine:Greek)

 
magic sophie
43305.  Thu Jan 05, 2006 2:35 pm Reply with quote

now that's QI... i came across a word the other month Orwellian

Quote:
Adj. 1. Orwellian - of or relating to the works of George Orwell (especially his picture of a future totalitarian state)


which I particularly like...maybe there should be something about The Meaning/Deeper Meaning of Liff... a dictionary for words that haven't been invented yet!

 
gerontius grumpus
43366.  Thu Jan 05, 2006 5:01 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
]Groats are oats without their coats.



The miller at Aberfeldy.

 
eggshaped
46190.  Tue Jan 17, 2006 7:04 am Reply with quote

From the Chambers Dictionary of the Twentieth Century (1901),

Éclair – A small cake, long in length but short in duration.

 

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