View previous topic | View next topic

Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

Jenny
27989.  Sun Oct 23, 2005 5:41 pm Reply with quote

Yes, I know there's a Doyle forum upstairs, but I wasn't sure if this was a public forum or not and there are a few QI things about him.

One is that Sherlock Holmes was originally named Sherringford Hope, and was renamed because Doyle's wife, Louise, told him it was a dreadful name that would never get anywhere. Doyle took Holmes' surname from Oliver Wendell Holmes, whose book on criminal psychology had just been published, and Sherlock from his favourite musician, a famous violinist named Alfred Sherlock.

 
Natalie
27990.  Sun Oct 23, 2005 5:43 pm Reply with quote

You seem to know a lot about Doyle Jenny, is there something you aren't telling us?

 
Jenny
28005.  Sun Oct 23, 2005 6:48 pm Reply with quote

I've just been reading a book with a large chapter devoted to him, Nat :-)

 
samivel
29639.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 12:01 am Reply with quote

From 1882 to 1890 Conan Doyle lived at Bush Villa, Elm Grove, Southsea. During this time he began his doctor's practice, wrote the first Sherlock Holmes stories and was one the men responsible for the founding of Portsmouth Football Club in 1884, becoming their first goalkeeper.

post

 
Flash
29662.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:49 am Reply with quote

We ran a question on the subject of literary goalkeepers in the second series, and JumpingJack was taken to task by a Rather Distinginguished literary figure who said it was a myth about the net-minding and that Conan Doyle was in fact a literary left back or something. I've forgotten the details, I'm afraid.

 
JumpingJack
29666.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:59 am Reply with quote

Was I?

I've forgotten not only the details but the main headings as well and indeed the whole incident.

 
Flash
29668.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 8:02 am Reply with quote

I probably made it up. But I could have sworn that I remembered you saying that you met Sebastian Faulks somewhere and he brought this up.

 
Mr Grue
30315.  Wed Nov 09, 2005 1:22 pm Reply with quote

Doyle was also initially intent on naming Sherlock's companion "Ormand Sacker". Luckily I'm not a schoolboy, and thus can discuss this without sniggering.

Snigger snigger.

 
tetsabb
35762.  Mon Nov 28, 2005 9:33 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:

One is that Sherlock Holmes was originally named Sherringford Hope, and was renamed because Doyle's wife, Louise, told him it was a dreadful name that would never get anywhere. Doyle took Holmes' surname from Oliver Wendell Holmes, whose book on criminal psychology had just been published, and Sherlock from his favourite musician, a famous violinist named Alfred Sherlock.

I am sure that a biography I read years ago (naturally author and title have long since disappeared in the untidy attic of my memory) about Doyle suggested that Sherlock was the surname of a cricketer he watched play.

 
AndyE
35990.  Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:47 am Reply with quote

This could well be true, although there is no player named Sherlock on Cricket Archive's list of first class players.

Conan Doyle was certainly a keen cricketer, although how good he was is uncertain. He made ten first class appearances, all for the MCC. In those days, anyone with money and the right connections could play for the MCC, and being good at cricket was not essential. And of course, Conan Doyle was something of a celebrity.

His most notable feat in those ten matches came against London County at Crystal Palace in 1900.

Dr W G Grace c Storer b Conan Doyle 110

This was Conan Doyle's only wicket in first class cricket. It was the only ball he ever bowled at Dr Grace, and he further claimed that he was the only cricketer in the world who could claim to have got Dr Grace with every ball he bowled at him. These claims have not been confirmed or disproved.

Also, Conan Doyle once proposed a change to the laws of cricket at the AGM of the MCC. He wanted to ban batting left handed, and it was seriously considered but ultimately dropped.

Finally, shouldn't this thread come under "C" rather than "D"?

 
djgordy
35993.  Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:54 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:

I am sure that a biography I read years ago (naturally author and title have long since disappeared in the untidy attic of my memory) about Doyle suggested that Sherlock was the surname of a cricketer he watched play.


Sherlock is proper surname. I know this because I once met a police constable named PC Sherlock.

 
Celebaelin
35998.  Tue Nov 29, 2005 9:34 am Reply with quote

No shit Sherlock.

 
tetsabb
36186.  Wed Nov 30, 2005 10:48 am Reply with quote

Why would anyone named Sherlock become a copper?
Is this not like a Crapper becoming a plumber?
I always thought that Stalker was a dodgy name for a Plod. I did meet a lady named Stalker when working for the Blood Service: I was taking donors to the beds for their donations: I called her name, and asked her to follow me... and she did!

 
Mr Grue
36525.  Fri Dec 02, 2005 9:14 am Reply with quote

AndyE wrote:

Finally, shouldn't this thread come under "C" rather than "D"?


It's a toughy. Strictly speaking his surname is Doyle. If memory serves, Conan is a partalineal middle name (I've got one of those too, as it happens). I'll check tonight and let you know. That said, because he is generally thought of as Conan Doyle, rather than Doyle, he does tend to turn up in indices under C rather than D. I was talking to Cushing's biographer the other night about this very point (by way of Houdini - long story) and in his The Complete Peter Cushing he and his editor decided when faced with the same dilemma to plump for the C.

 
Flash
36534.  Fri Dec 02, 2005 10:18 am Reply with quote

I'm just off to re-arrange my bookshelf, but before I do - what about Henry Rider Haggard, Edgar Allan Poe and George Macdonald Fraser?

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group