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Horrors (Halloween)

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OpDDay2001
622573.  Tue Oct 06, 2009 8:53 pm Reply with quote

I'm surprised this hasn't been posted (and if it has, it doesn't have it's own topic that I can find) but Horrors would make a good H special, especially for Halloween. Maybe some feel that it is too obvious and not always that interesting?

There are many types of Horrors. From monsters and ghouls, to irrational fears. People through out the ages have told horror stories, and many are fantastic tales of gore or terror. Edgar Alan Poe's "Raven" is considered by some to be macabre and a horror.

Horror ranges from the Gothic to the Gruesome, and every culture I can personally think of has some form of horror story or legend.

In Japan, there are several words that mean "demon/devil" (akuma, oni, youkai [which is technically closer to "spirit" than "demon" but it's related]) and there are different classes as well. Many Ancient Japanese "horror" stories were used to scare children out of dangerous behavior. One such story is that of the "Kappa".

The legend of the Kappa is, that in various bodies of water live these youkai who feed on people. One of their favorite food is children, which they lure into the water at night and drown then eat them. Though in some legends they are not entirely antagonistic towards humans, they are still troublemakers and pranksters. The only thing they love more than Children is cucumbers. The Kappa is a just one of many examples of Japanese Horrors.

Then finally, there is one more type of horror that could be discussed. Things like accidents, murders, and some of the more serious crimes. These things are often horrible, for many reasons and in their own way. These things scar people and affect the psyche. These are personal horrors, and it's be interesting to talk about certain aspects of the brain that cause us to remember these horrors, or suppress them.

Horrors, from the fantastic to the terrible, I think would make an interesting show. A quite interesting one, at that.

 
Sophie.A
622726.  Wed Oct 07, 2009 10:09 am Reply with quote

Halloween is not “celebrated” in Britain as much as it is in America. Maybe this is why this topic hasn’t cropped up in this section.

 
suze
622752.  Wed Oct 07, 2009 11:30 am Reply with quote

Would that this were true, Sophie!

Come Hallowe'en in a few weeks' time, may I tell horrible little kids who come banging on my door that we don't actually do Hallowe'en in the UK, and that they must therefore be a figment of my imagination?

 
Sophie.A
622812.  Wed Oct 07, 2009 1:39 pm Reply with quote

American influence, no doubt. That’s what I’d blame it on.

 
AlmondFacialBar
622837.  Wed Oct 07, 2009 2:15 pm Reply with quote

it's actually an irish festival originally...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
OpDDay2001
622918.  Wed Oct 07, 2009 9:25 pm Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
it's actually an irish festival originally...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Something like that... thought, like most Holidays, that it had it's roots in Pagan festivals and feasts.

"It has roots in the Celtic festival of Samhain and the Christian holy day of All Saints’ Day. It is largely a secular celebration, but some have expressed strong feelings about perceived religious overtones."

Seems we were both right, sorta.

Either way, regardless of whether Halloween is as wide spread in the UK, horrors itself is an interesting topic.

 
Sophie.A
622929.  Thu Oct 08, 2009 2:48 am Reply with quote

Dara Ó Briain: Yeah, and they’ve still got All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day around by the time the people were celebrating …

Stephen Fry: I don’t think there's an Arseholes’ Day.

 
Spud McLaren
622954.  Thu Oct 08, 2009 4:33 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Would that this were true, Sophie!

Come Hallowe'en in a few weeks' time, may I tell horrible little kids who come banging on my door that we don't actually do Hallowe'en in the UK, and that they must therefore be a figment of my imagination?


I've tried that - tends to go over their heads. In fact for reply, one lad turned around, pulled down his trousers and parted his buttocks, which was considerably more horrific than the "Scream" mask he'd been wearing over his face.

For a bit of pointless point-scoring, when asked, "Trick or treat?", answer, "Oooh, I'll have a treat, please!" and then count the seconds until the next utterance...

 
Celebaelin
623044.  Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:41 am Reply with quote

There's a bit about Halloween (and its disputed relation to Samhaine) in the Grail (Holy) thread in the G series forum starting at post 432754 and also in a Halloween thread in Quite Interestrings starting at post 433131.

 
dmottram
623742.  Fri Oct 09, 2009 4:43 pm Reply with quote

Celebaelin wrote:
There's a bit about Halloween (and its disputed relation to Samhaine) in the Grail (Holy) thread in the G series forum starting at post 432754 and also in a Halloween thread in Quite Interestrings starting at post 433131.
Recommend book on this - "Stations of the Sun" by Ronald Hutton, Professor of history. He is, I believe, a modern pagan sympathiser but he concludes, about Samhain "There is no evidence it was connected with the dead"

As to All Saints, of which Halloween is the Eve, he writes ".. This makes nonsense of Frazer's notion that the November date was chosen because of 'Celtic' influence".

Hallowe'en? Catholic and so much misunderstood in Protestant England and USA.

 
thedrew
623750.  Fri Oct 09, 2009 5:07 pm Reply with quote

"What?!? Trick or treat? This is England not America! What are you talking about?!?"

-Hugh Laurie

 
AlmondFacialBar
623751.  Fri Oct 09, 2009 5:09 pm Reply with quote

thedrew wrote:
"What?!? Trick or treat? This is England not America! What are you talking about?!?"

-Hugh Laurie


thanks, you just gave the most hilarious mental image in tv-history! :-D

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
623760.  Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:12 pm Reply with quote

dmottram wrote:
Hallowe'en? Catholic and so much misunderstood in Protestant England and USA.


I suppose some Catholics are more willing to accept Hallowe'en as a religious occasion than a lot of Protestants (except for those who celebrate the date as Reformation Day), but when it comes down to it it's a secular occasion. The following day - All Saints - absolutely is a major occasion to Catholics, but it's eve isn't really.

At least, it wasn't in my youth. I was never allowed to do trick or treating because my parents considered it both pagan and tantamount to begging (they differed in the order of importance they attached to those two reasons).

In those days, I gather that it was practically unknown in the UK. Sadly that's no longer the case, but all the same trickers and treaters are not welcome at our home. Quite apart from it being pagan and tantamount to begging, here's another reason:

When trick or treaters came, it was at one time usual to give them sweets or fruit. But these days, one is strongly discouraged from giving such things to "strange" children, and in any case they don't want sweets or fruit, they want money. And demanding money with menaces (for what is "trick" if it's not an unspecified menace) is illegal.

 
Jenny
623793.  Fri Oct 09, 2009 8:21 pm Reply with quote

None of the kids here expect money - strictly candy.

 
suze
623881.  Sat Oct 10, 2009 5:35 am Reply with quote

Is giving sweets to "strange" kids still "allowed" where you live, then? British hysteria about "paedophiles" is such that this is a thing that one is very strongly advised not to do, and furthermore kids are warned in school not to accept any such offer.

Or is the difference that Maine kids only go banging on the doors of people they know? Here, they go indiscriminately from door to door as surely as do the Jehovah's Witnesses (they were here about twenty minutes ago!).

 

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