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Homophones, Homonyms, and Homographs

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OpDDay2001
621787.  Sun Oct 04, 2009 11:37 pm Reply with quote

Holy H.

As the title suggests, I would think it'd be Quite Interesting to see a show about all things homo-, by which I mean words that are the same or similar to each other in one way or another.

There are a lot of examples of these three types of words, but for those less than literate types who may have stumbled upon this I shall go over what each of the three are (though in many ways they overlap each other).

    Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings. Phone being Ancient Greek for sound, and homo being Greek for "same". Words like tire, and tire; as well as to, too, and two are examples.

    Homonyms are words that are spelled and said the same way, but have entirely separate meanings. Nym is Ancient Greek for "name". An example being stalk and stalk.

    Homographs are words that share only spelling, regardless how they sound. Graph is once again Greek, this time for "writing". An example would be wind (short i, emphasis on the d; as in an air current) and wind (long i, emphasis on the i; as in twisting).


As you can imagine several of these definitions and even the words themselves can overlap with each other. This would require visual representation for some questions, which can be used through mini whiteboards, chalkboards, notepads, alphabet magnets, or the QI "jumbotron".

For further consideration, the following link is to a picture of a Venn Diagram showing the relationship of words to each other.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Homograph_homophone_venn_diagram.png

 
Rudolph Hucker
621793.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 1:30 am Reply with quote

Being a less than literate type myself, please would you explain the different meanings of the two tires. Or is there an American influence at work?

 
AlmondFacialBar
621795.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:15 am Reply with quote

a car tire and the verb to tire?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Rudolph Hucker
621798.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:32 am Reply with quote

That would be the American influence then. The mother tongue likes it spelled tyre.

 
Alfred E Neuman
621801.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:55 am Reply with quote

My old Guinness Book of Records (from the seventies) tells me that the homophone with the greatest number of meanings is "rose".


Last edited by Alfred E Neuman on Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:58 am; edited 1 time in total

 
AlmondFacialBar
621802.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:55 am Reply with quote

it's still a valid example whichever way you spell it because it's all pronounced the same.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Last edited by AlmondFacialBar on Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:02 am; edited 2 times in total

 
Sophie.A
621813.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:42 am Reply with quote

OpDDay2001 wrote:
Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings. Phone being Ancient Greek for sound, and homo being Greek for "same". Words like tire, and tire; as well as to, too, and two are examples.

Homonyms are words that are spelled and said the same way, but have entirely separate meanings. Nym is Ancient Greek for "name". An example being stalk and stalk.

Homographs are words that share only spelling, regardless how they sound. Graph is once again Greek, this time for "writing". An example would be wind (short i, emphasis on the d; as in an air current) and wind (long i, emphasis on the i; as in twisting).

So a homonym is a word that is both a homophone and a homograph, is that it?

 
OpDDay2001
621947.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 11:05 am Reply with quote

Term Meaning Spelling Pronunciation
Homonym Different Same Same

Homograph Different Same Same
or different

Homophone Different Same Same
or different

They overlap at certain points, but they aren't always the same thing. That is to say, a homonym is not always a homograph, nor is it always a homophone. It's a linguistics thing and depends on it's use more than anything really. I'm leaving out a couple of definitions/linguistic classifications, maybe those will clear things up a bit.

From Wikipedia, the indispensable liar (i.e. Take with a grain of salt):

"* Heteronyms (literally "different name") are the subset of homographs (words that share the same spelling) that have different pronunciations (and meanings). That is, they are homographs which are not homophones. Such words include desert (to abandon) and desert (arid region); row (to argue or an argument) and row (as in to row a boat or a row of seats). Note that the latter meaning also constitutes a homophone. Heteronyms are also sometimes called heterophones (literally "different sound"). ("Heteronym" also has a specialized meaning in poetry; see Heteronym (literature).)

* Polysemes are words with the same spelling and distinct but related meanings. The distinction between polysemy and homonymy is often subtle and subjective, and not all sources consider polysemous words to be homonyms. Words such as "mouth", meaning either the orifice on one's face, or the opening of a cave or river, are polysemous and may or may not be considered homonyms.

* Capitonyms are words that share the same spelling but have different meanings when capitalized (and may or may not have different pronunciations). Such words include polish (to make shiny) and Polish (from Poland); march (organized, uniformed, steady and rhythmic walking forward) and March (the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar)."

As you can guess, it can get a bit confusing depending on the question you are trying to ask, but it'd certainly be amusing. As an example. I imagine Mr. Fry holding up a card (or it appearing on the screen) that says "Wind", and asking how it is pronounced. Seems like an easy enough question right? Well, as far as I've seen when eople see the word "wind", most think of and say it as if it was a current of air. This could then set off the buzzer and so would the other pronunciation. As the correct answer is both wind (short i) and wind (long i). That's one type of question that could be asked, but there are many other types of questions. There are many different types of homonyms, homographs, and homophones and the way they overlap could be fun. Besides there are plenty to talk about on a lot of words. Words like bark, rose, wind, and so on. There are plenty of words available and thus, plenty of wiggle room for other quite interesting things to be talked about.

Wikipedia link to the page on Homonyms (but it has a lot of information on the other linguistic terms):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homonym

 
suze
621948.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 11:07 am Reply with quote

Sophie.A wrote:
So a homonym is a word that is both a homophone and a homograph, is that it?


As described here, yes. Although that usage isn't universal - some define homonym in the way that we have here defined homograph.


If we are to have a homo-show, then we must also have a hetero-show. And in the hetero-show, I'd like to confuse Stephen with the Grelling-Nelson Paradox (which was called Weyl's Paradox when I first learned of it, but that name is wrong).

Autological means that a word describes itself - so for instance, "word", or "unhyphenated", or "finite". A word which does not describe itself is said to be heterological. Is the word "heterological" of itself autological or heterological?

(Note to longer established forum members - yes, we have done this one before on these forums.)


Last edited by suze on Mon Oct 05, 2009 11:17 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Sophie.A
621949.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 11:10 am Reply with quote

OpDDay2001 wrote:
Term Meaning Spelling Pronunciation

Homophone Different Same Same
or different

I presume you mean Homophone Different Same or different Same.

 
OpDDay2001
621955.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 11:20 am Reply with quote

Oh bother. Why did the the format look correct when I previewed the post but go completely to pot when I posted it. Effin' thing sucks. lol.

Yes.

Homograph is Different meaning, Same spelling, and Same or different pronunciation.

Homophone is Different meaning, Same or different spelling, and Same pronunciation.

 
Sophie.A
621958.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 11:27 am Reply with quote

OpDDay2001 wrote:
Oh bother. Why did the the format look correct when I previewed the post but go completely to pot when I posted it. Effin' thing sucks. lol.

When you post, phpBB replaces multiple spaces with a single space. You can try putting your text in code tags; this will preserve mutiple spaces as well as making all characters have the same width.

Code:
Term      Meaning   Spelling       Pronunciation

Homophone Different Same/Different Same


Last edited by Sophie.A on Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:22 am; edited 3 times in total

 
Davini994
622021.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:47 pm Reply with quote

Suze wrote:
If we are to have a homo-show, then we must also have a hetero-show.

Typical!

;)

 
Rudolph Hucker
622032.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:00 pm Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
it's still a valid example whichever way you spell it because it's all pronounced the same.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


That was rather my point: if you write the same word twice, naturally enough it will be pronounced the same.

I was asking whether my perception that there are not two separate words spelt tire in the English language was correct. If not, then what is the meaning of the second one.

 
Leith
622109.  Mon Oct 05, 2009 6:31 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Sophie.A wrote:
So a homonym is a word that is both a homophone and a homograph, is that it?

As described here, yes. Although that usage isn't universal - some define homonym in the way that we have here defined homograph.

So homonym and homonym are homonyms while homonym and homograph are synonyms?

 

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