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D flat major

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gerontius grumpus
46117.  Mon Jan 16, 2006 5:40 pm Reply with quote

Why does Dobby the house elf look so like Vladimdir Putin?

 
Natalie
46118.  Mon Jan 16, 2006 5:41 pm Reply with quote

How can you "feel" a chord? I just play it...not that I play the piano.

 
Cut_Up_Angel
46122.  Mon Jan 16, 2006 5:49 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:
Why does Dobby the house elf look so like Vladimdir Putin?


He he now that you point that out I can see it...

Vladimir the House Elf...

 
Frances
46187.  Tue Jan 17, 2006 6:58 am Reply with quote

Russia actually sent a protest about the resemblance - or was that just a media story?

 
Zaphod Beeblebrox
46349.  Tue Jan 17, 2006 1:36 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
How can you "feel" a chord? I just play it...not that I play the piano.


Well certain chords or types of chords have connotations to some people, and some people visualise things when they hear music, whether it's a colour or a picture or whatever, so I assume some people feel things when they hear music.

On that note (oh dear), Colonel Krummhorn, would you say that the chord Db, E, Ab has a different feel to it (C#, E, G#) or do you do equal temperement?
(I don't know if you have perfect pitch - it would just be interesting to know if the slightly different true pitchings of notes have an effect on the feel of the chord)

 
Colonel Krummhorn
46583.  Wed Jan 18, 2006 2:01 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Well certain chords or types of chords have connotations to some people, and some people visualise things when they hear music, whether it's a colour or a picture or whatever, so I assume some people feel things when they hear music.

On that note (oh dear), Colonel Krummhorn, would you say that the chord Db, E, Ab has a different feel to it (C#, E, G#) or do you do equal temperement?
(I don't know if you have perfect pitch - it would just be interesting to know if the slightly different true pitchings of notes have an effect on the feel of the chord)



It feels the same. I am strongly synaesthetic (if that is the correct term, when senses overlap creating associations like colour/sound and number/texture).
Different notes and chords have different colours, letters, words etc.
So I think it depends on the sound, not the notes I am thinking of when I play it.

 
Jenny
46593.  Wed Jan 18, 2006 2:37 pm Reply with quote

Garrick is synaesthetic too - how do those notes sound to you, garrick?

 
Gaazy
46709.  Thu Jan 19, 2006 12:32 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
Gaazy wrote:
Looks like I'm going to have to read some of Ms Rowling's oeuvre.


Now why on earth would you want to do a thing like that?

I'm wondering why on earth I said it in the first place.

Oh, I know, it was something to do with a Dobby of whom I'd never heard.

The older I get, the less I understand.

 
Flash
46771.  Fri Jan 20, 2006 6:36 am Reply with quote

Colonel Krummhorn wrote:
The chord C#,E,G# seems to have a slightly Soviet feel.
Does anyone else feel this?

Isn't it just a minor triad? Or are you saying that C#m sounds more Soviet than other minor triads?

 
gerontius grumpus
46773.  Fri Jan 20, 2006 6:40 am Reply with quote

I used to work in a department that had a mobile X-ray machine on which the plug made the opening chord of Clair de Lune when it was pulled out of the socket.

 
Zaphod Beeblebrox
46840.  Fri Jan 20, 2006 11:06 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Colonel Krummhorn wrote:
The chord C#,E,G# seems to have a slightly Soviet feel.
Does anyone else feel this?

Isn't it just a minor triad? Or are you saying that C#m sounds more Soviet than other minor triads?


I think so... I don't really visualise things in music but I do feel something sometimes, for instance, to me, the diminished 5th, Eb-A, sounds more sinister and atmospheric (I can't really find the right words, but you know what I mean) than other diminishes 5ths, like F#-C.

 
Colonel Krummhorn
47029.  Sat Jan 21, 2006 1:52 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
I used to work in a department that had a mobile X-ray machine on which the plug made the opening chord of Clair de Lune when it was pulled out of the socket.


Wow. I was playing that earlier. It is so peaceful.


Quote:
Isn't it just a minor triad? Or are you saying that C#m sounds more Soviet than other minor triads?


Not all minor triads carry that Soviet feel, just C#m.

 
mckeonj
47046.  Sat Jan 21, 2006 2:35 pm Reply with quote

Concerning triads, some readers may be interested in this little device which I knocked up a few years ago. Print out the picture on stiffish paper, cut out the two circles and pin them to the centre of the base circle. Read the instructions, and enjoy. Warning, can cause intense irritation to professional musicians.

Instructions
The Harmonator has three circles, two of which are moveable. The outer fixed circle is divided into twelve parts, which correspond to the twelve SEMITONES of the CHROMATIC SCALE: eight of the twelve are numbered to correspond to the eight notes of the TONIC scale. The eighth note is renumbered 1 because it is the first note of the next scale which is one OCTAVE separate; that is the PITCH is doubled.
The second moveable circle is also divided into twelve and shows the PITCH of the notes. By setting the KEYNOTE, for example C, against the number l, one can read off the notes of the scale of C:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
C D E F G A B C'

By setting another note as keynote against 1, one can read off the notes of that scale, for example the key of A:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
A B C+ D E F+ G+ A

Conventionally, the semitones of an ascending scale are marked SHARP (#), and of a descending scale, FLAT (b), the Harmonator is marked + at the semitones.

The third moveable circle is marked with three triangles in different colours; these show the three chief TRIADS which can be built on the notes of any scale; a CHORD is normally built of four notes, the fourth being one octave above or below one of the notes of the triad.
The black triangle shows the MAJOR triad which can be built on the lst, 4th, and 5th notes of the scale, marked with black circles; the red triangle the MINOR triad which can be built on the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th notes of the scale, marked with red circles; and the blue triangle the DIMINISHED triad which can be built on the 7th note of the scale, marked with a blue circle.

To work out a chord, set the point where the three triangles meet against the note of the scale on which the chord is to be built, and read off the other two notes at the other two point of the triangle.
For example, the chord of C# major in the scale of F#

C# F G# C#'

Copyright John McKeon, Limerick, 1986

 
Celebaelin
47048.  Sat Jan 21, 2006 2:49 pm Reply with quote

Der Harminator - A must see **** (The Stir)

"I'll be Bach."

 
samivel
47065.  Sat Jan 21, 2006 4:29 pm Reply with quote

<laughs>

Ooh, I like that! :)

 

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