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Half Inch

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Ian Dunn
591999.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 3:01 am Reply with quote

"Half inch" is Cockney rhyming slang for "Pinch".

On this subject, a league table has been published of UK burglary "hotspots". The top ten places are:

1) Manchester: 35 burglaries per 1,000 homes (7,167 total)

2) Nottingham: 33 per 1,000 homes (4,367 total)

3) Reading: 30 per 1,000 homes (1,769 total)

4) Haringey, London: 30 per 1,000 homes (2,870 total)

5) Leeds: 28 per 1,000 homes (9,248 total)

6) Bradford: 27 per 1,000 homes (5,236 total)

7) Luton: 27 per 1,000 homes (2,020 total)

8) Enfield: 26 per 1,000 homes (3,049 total)

9) Slough: 26 per 1,000 homes (1,207 total)

10) Bristol: 26 per 1,000 homes (4,706 total)

The area with the least burglaries in the UK is Teesdale, County Durham.

Source: BBC

 
Posital
592105.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 7:44 am Reply with quote

I wonder what the BBC's source is.

 
samivel
592126.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:12 am Reply with quote

Well, according to Reuters, the figures came from the Conservatives and are '[b]ased on statistics from 368 Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships'.

 
zomgmouse
592145.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:29 am Reply with quote

I've always wondered; how does one pronounce "Reuters"? Is it Rooters, or Roiters, or Rurters?

 
samivel
592156.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:37 am Reply with quote

The first syllable rhymes with 'toy'.

 
Ion Zone
592157.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:37 am Reply with quote

The 'e' is probably silent.


Which reminds me, why do we have silent letters....?

 
soup
592179.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:57 am Reply with quote

Why are the top ten burglary sites all in England? Are Scots and Northern Irish people perhaps more honest than anyone else or have 'they' used UK when 'they' mean England and Wales again?

 
Ion Zone
592182.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:59 am Reply with quote

In Ireland, probably.

 
zomgmouse
592234.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 9:56 am Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
The first syllable rhymes with 'toy'.

So "Roiters" it is. I presume it's German.

 
Ian Dunn
592237.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 10:00 am Reply with quote

soup wrote:
Why are the top ten burglary sites all in England? Are Scots and Northern Irish people perhaps more honest than anyone else or have 'they' used UK when 'they' mean England and Wales again?


I believe the story does just cover England and Wales. I should have made that clearer. Sorry.

 
soup
592251.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 10:13 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
soup wrote:
Why are the top ten burglary sites all in England? Are Scots and Northern Irish people perhaps more honest than anyone else or have 'they' used UK when 'they' mean England and Wales again?


I believe the story does just cover England and Wales. I should have made that clearer. Sorry.


Looking at the article it does indeed say UK's burglary 'hotspots' revealed then goes on to 'talk' of A league table of burglary "hotspots" in England and Wales . It gets so tiresome all this talk of the Uk consisting of England and Wales.

 
samivel
592283.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 11:54 am Reply with quote

zomgmouse wrote:
samivel wrote:
The first syllable rhymes with 'toy'.

So "Roiters" it is. I presume it's German.


The name, or the company? It was founded by Paul Reuter in the nineteenth century. He was born in Germany but moved to Britain and became a UK citizen, though I don't know if this was before or after he started the business. Anyway, it's now part of Thomson Reuters, and is Canadian-owned but based in the UK.

 
Gaazy
592284.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 11:59 am Reply with quote

I wish I'd kept the details over the years of news stories of inept thieves, burglars, robbers and their ilk - it'd make a great book.

One of the latest of these was in the news this week - the less than ept Keith Cullen and Paul Wiggins broke into a Swansea drinks depot, and then drank until they were incapable of escaping.

According to the Telegraph:

Quote:
They had wheeled out more than 700 worth of alcohol causing 1,400 worth of damage, and could not resist drinking the stock. They then turned up at Swansea magistrates' court so drunk that Cullen was not even allowed in the building.


But there are so many of these! I particularly like the one about the bloke who went out to rob a bank, ensured he was wearing a balaclava, and then - of all the banks he could have relieved of cash - selected the bank where he worked.

He was immediately recognised by the teller, by his voice alone.

 
suze
592387.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 3:39 pm Reply with quote

Ion Zone wrote:
Which reminds me, why do we have silent letters....?


I don't have the time right now to give as detailed an answer as the question deserves. But in most cases, it's either for historical reasons (i.e. the letter which has become silent used to be pronounced - for instance, both the <k> and the <gh> in "knight"), or because the letter wasn't silent in the language from which the word was borrowed but has become so in order to sound "more English".

There are also a few words in which a silent letter is utterly spurious and has no real business being there; "debt" and "ptarmigan" are two that come at once to mind.

 
zomgmouse
592614.  Thu Jul 30, 2009 7:20 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
zomgmouse wrote:
samivel wrote:
The first syllable rhymes with 'toy'.

So "Roiters" it is. I presume it's German.


The name, or the company? It was founded by Paul Reuter in the nineteenth century. He was born in Germany but moved to Britain and became a UK citizen, though I don't know if this was before or after he started the business. Anyway, it's now part of Thomson Reuters, and is Canadian-owned but based in the UK.

The name. I know that in German "eu" is pronounced "oi".

 

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