View previous topic | View next topic

Toucan Bills

Page 1 of 1

Ian Dunn
589064.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:31 am Reply with quote

Scientists have discovered why toucans have such big bills - its to regulate body temperature.

In thesame way elephants have big ears to keep cool, the toucan, which has the biggest bill of any bird relative to its body size, also uses its big bill to keep cool.

Story from the BBC

 
zomgmouse
589070.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:43 am Reply with quote

I wonder if this is the same for pelicans' beaks and giraffes' necks, and indeed any animal with disproportionately large features.

 
Ian Dunn
589076.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:48 am Reply with quote

I think that is an experiment you'll have to conduct yourself.

 
zomgmouse
589083.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:55 am Reply with quote

I know, I'll breed a toucan-elephant hybrid and keep it as my central heating and cooling system. Toucaphant™ will be in a store near you (or more likely I will be in an asylum near you) very soon. Keep an eye out (for headlines).

 
Ian Dunn
589089.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:59 am Reply with quote

I'll bare it all in mind.

 
suze
589096.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:07 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
I'll bare it all in mind.


What, you'll keep cooler if you take your clothes off?

Seems very likely to work ...

 
Ian Dunn
589105.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:17 am Reply with quote

It could be worse. I could bear it in mind and develop a cooling system powered by polar bears.

 
CB27
589152.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 12:03 pm Reply with quote

With this recession, can the Toucans afford their heating bills?

 
Ameena
589183.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 2:25 pm Reply with quote

The tails on rodents are used for heat regulation too. I've read that on rats it's something like...ohh what was it...about 17% or something. That is, about 17% of heat is lost through the tail, and rats with no tails can overheat more easily.
It was years ago I read that, and I can't remember where, so the figure might be a bit off.

 
Bondee
589219.  Fri Jul 24, 2009 4:04 pm Reply with quote

zomgmouse wrote:
I wonder if this is the same for pelicans' beaks and giraffes' necks, and indeed any animal with disproportionately large features.


Pelicans beaks are like that so they can disguise themselves as butterfly nets.

 
Sadurian Mike
589333.  Sat Jul 25, 2009 1:38 am Reply with quote

Also so that they can fit pigeons in them, something a sparrow would never manage.

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group