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HUMBERSIDE or EAST YORKSHIRE?

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Davini994
581639.  Thu Jul 09, 2009 4:47 pm Reply with quote

I worked at Central Middlesex hospital for several years. How can somewhere that doesn't exist have a centre? Where on earth was I?

 
Bondee
581656.  Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:11 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
I fear that perhaps it has. You, I am reliably informed, live in Surrey.


Yes, you're right suze. Middlesex now only exists for "postal" purposes.

Staines is a bit of an anomaly when it comes to location. Although it's now classed as being in Surrey, it's actually on the wrong side of the river. So it's not just my life that's been an illusion, but also my home town which, apparently, exists in its own little part of England. That would explain the backwardness of a lot of the locals.

The River Colne, which joins the Thames just east of Staines bridge, was once the official western boundary of Middlesex.

The next station towards London has undergone several name changes which has caused quite a bit of confusion. It was originally known as "Ashford (Middlesex)" to distinguish it from "Ashford (Kent)". A few years ago South West Trains decided to rename it "Ashford (Surrey)" which resulted in passengers for "Ashford (Kent)", now known as "Ashford International" arriving in the town and asking for directions to the Channel Tunnel Rail Link because they'd been told not to go to "Ashford (Middlesex)".

 
suze
581697.  Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:50 pm Reply with quote

Yea, the two places called Ashford do seem to cause a fair amount of confusion.

The good husband assures me that when Middlesex County Council was abolished, all bar two of the areas which had been within its area passed into Greater London. The two were the Ashford / Staines area which passed to Surrey, and the Potters Bar area which passed to Hertfordshire.

You don't seem to see any references to "Potters Bar, Middlesex" these days, so why the people of Ashford and Staines have been more resistent I don't really know. Is it just the notion that Ashford and Staines are on the Middlesex bank of the Thames, and hence can't possibly belong to Surrey?

 
Bondee
581724.  Thu Jul 09, 2009 6:20 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Is it just the notion that Ashford and Staines are on the Middlesex bank of the Thames, and hence can't possibly belong to Surrey?


I think so. You always hear of the "Middlesex bank" and "Surrey bank" in reference to the Boat Race, the Middlesex bank being north of the river. The schools in the area come under Surrey County Council and Staines police station is run by Surrey Police so I guess we're getting there slowly but surely. : )

There is actually a very small part of Staines on the Surrey side of the river. The Hythe, which is the area bordered by Staines Bridge, the A320 and the railway line.
(link to Google Maps)

I like it because you can look at it from the Middlesex bank and imagine you're somewhere nice...

 
swanbarly
581897.  Fri Jul 10, 2009 4:46 am Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:


Yes, you're right suze. Middlesex now only exists for "postal" purposes.



I think that's right at an organisational level, with the exception of Middlesex County Cricket Club. Until recently, there was one other though. The Middlesex Area Probation Service was one of five services across London which were amalgamated in 2001.

 
samivel
581929.  Fri Jul 10, 2009 5:12 am Reply with quote

Even the idea of Middlesex existing for postal reasons seems a bit dodgy, as Royal Mail list addresses without counties these days.

suze wrote:
You don't seem to see any references to "Potters Bar, Middlesex" these days, so why the people of Ashford and Staines have been more resistent I don't really know.


You do see references to 'Twickenham, Middlesex', though.

 
Leith
582299.  Fri Jul 10, 2009 3:00 pm Reply with quote

Davini994 wrote:
I worked at Central Middlesex hospital for several years. How can somewhere that doesn't exist have a centre? Where on earth was I?

The 'middle of nowhere', presumably. I've always wondered where that was.

 
suze
582333.  Fri Jul 10, 2009 4:29 pm Reply with quote

Leith wrote:
The 'middle of nowhere', presumably.


Since the Central Middlesex Hospital is located in the urban wasteland that is Park Royal, that's actually about right.

 
Bondee
582740.  Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:03 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
You do see references to 'Twickenham, Middlesex', though.


And "Richmond, Surrey" funnily enough. It's on the right side of the river, but it's closer to central London than Twickenham.

Teddington, where I work, is in the "London Borough of Richmond-upon-Thames", but the address is "Teddington, Middlesex".

 
markfleeds
622870.  Wed Oct 07, 2009 3:54 pm Reply with quote

Going back to the question in the thread title, the official answer is East Riding of Yorkshire. Which is odd, since the word Riding comes from the old English "thrydding" meaning "a third", because it originally applied to the old three divisions of Yorkshire - West Riding, North Riding and East Riding (South Riding was a novel by Winifred Holtby but never existed in real life).

When the counties were re-organised in 1974 the Ridings were officially consigned to history with North Riding becoming North Yorks, West Riding being split into West and South Yorks, and East Riding being lumped in with a bit of Lincolnshire to become Humberside.

Like most of the reforms of '74 this was never very popular, especially the Humberside bit, and in 1997 they had another revamp in which counties like Avon and Cleveland were abolished and Rutland reinstated. The Ridings weren't brought back for all of Yorkshire, but Humberside got to revert back to being the East Riding of Yorkshire. So now there's only one Riding but four bits of Yorkshire, even though Riding means a third.

 
suze
622875.  Wed Oct 07, 2009 4:55 pm Reply with quote

Weren't there always four lumps of Yorkshire though?

The City of York was not in any of the ridings, much as the three ridings all had boundaries with the City of York.

 
markfleeds
623024.  Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:03 am Reply with quote

You're right, as I now know having consulted the font of all wisdom, aka Wikipedia.

Even so, I think it still made more sense under the old arrangment, where there were essentially three counties (plus York) as opposed to now where there are four counties.

 
Jenny
623107.  Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:26 am Reply with quote

I didn't realise the East Riding was now the only Riding. Bit silly, that.

 
Davini994
623190.  Thu Oct 08, 2009 2:00 pm Reply with quote

From my head, so not necessarily accurate:

It's called East Riding of Yorkshire as there is technical reference to East Yorkshire elsewhere, remembering that North Humberside was cleaved off at the time and no longer in Yorkshire.

This could have been received Ulsian paranoia of course.

 
Peregrine Arkwright
623721.  Fri Oct 09, 2009 3:58 pm Reply with quote

Davini994 wrote:
I worked at Central Middlesex hospital for several years. How can somewhere that doesn't exist have a centre? Where on earth was I?

Count yourself lucky it existed as recently as ten years ago. If you were the Countess of Wessex, f'rinstance, you are Countess of a place which hasn't existed for the past 1,200 years.

Peregrine Arkwright

 

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