View previous topic | View next topic

Dogs

Page 3 of 5
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

Gaazy
27255.  Tue Oct 18, 2005 9:19 am Reply with quote

As it happens, there's a story in the news today about a 19 year old youth who's been arrested on suspicion of throwing a bunny-rabbit to an alligator at Colwyn Bay Mountain Zoo.

Curiously, the news agency reporting it included the fact that the alligator's name was Albert, which made it difficult for the television news reporter to look as grave as perhaps he should.

The rabbit, inevitably, was comprehensively eaten by Albert, which ought to have made the story a tear-jerker - after all, if the rabbit had been savaged by a dog the whole tone would have been different.

Wouldn't it?

 
laidbacklazyman
27278.  Tue Oct 18, 2005 1:35 pm Reply with quote

Do we all know what dogs are exempt from the ban on dogs at the Houses of Parliament?

Forfeit = King Charles Spanials

Answer - only guide dogs, all other dogs have been banned.

 
Flash
27279.  Tue Oct 18, 2005 1:48 pm Reply with quote

Isn't there a sign up that says "any animal leading a blind person will be deemed to be a cat"?

 
BornWithoutABumhole
27282.  Tue Oct 18, 2005 2:44 pm Reply with quote

has anyone else heard this?

Apparently, any breed of dog should be able to mate with any other breed of dog and produce healthy offspring but I heard somewhere that it would be a physical impossibility for Jack Russells and Alsations to interbreed. A female Jack Russell trying to carry a male Alsation's puppies would kill her and the puppies too and a male Jack Russell trying to mate with a female Alsation would be a physical impossibility unless he was very clever and descended onto her from a tree and precariously balanced while he did the business while simultaneously fighting off other rival dogs who saw that she was on heat. This would probably mean if you put the two breeds on an island together and deserted them for a million years or so, they would not interbreed and remain entirely separate. Don't know if it's true or not, but it seems quite plausible.

 
Flash
27283.  Tue Oct 18, 2005 2:53 pm Reply with quote

That sounds right: a mechanical difficulty rather than a genetic one. Similarly, my theoretical ability to interbreed with Jessica Simpson (qv elsewhere) might be constrained by budgetary considerations and other practical inconveniences.

 
Pyreo
27288.  Tue Oct 18, 2005 3:39 pm Reply with quote

Some species of bulldog have hips so weak they cannot give birth without human intervention.

I hope that's right anyway... a sad thought. Terrible thing what pedigree inbreeding can do.

 
Ribbo
27309.  Tue Oct 18, 2005 5:28 pm Reply with quote

The saddest thing about pedigree inbreeding is the chinese shar-pei

They have chronic skin problems (skin folds must be daily swabbed to prevent infections), they also suffer from entropion (inturned eyelids) and get a high number of allergies.
Originating around the time of the Han dynasty (200AD), it was recognised as a fighting dog, which made it perfect for hunting, protection and herding animals. The pedigree breeders decided breeding the dogs to have more folds was a good thing, therefore guaranteeing a lifetime of pain for the offspring.

 
Jenny
28440.  Wed Oct 26, 2005 10:33 am Reply with quote

One of the songs I'm practising with my choir is John Rutter's setting of The Somerset Wassail. There is a curious line in it about 'the girt dog of Langport he burned his long tail' and I googled it out of curiosity.

It seems that some people say they have detected a zodiac in earthworks and natural features around Glastonbury Tor, and that 'the girt dog of Langport' is a five-mile long feature outside the town, representing the star group Canis Major.

Sadly, it's hard to disentangle actual history from New Age whimsy on this issue, but it might be a rewarding avenue to explore.

http://www.vortexmaps.com/htmla/somerset.htm

http://www.crystalinks.com/glastonburytor.html (look at the Glastonbury Giants section)

http://www.isleofavalon.co.uk/avalon-zodiac.html

 
Jenny
29261.  Tue Nov 01, 2005 7:29 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
By the time the witchhunt ended, nineteen convicted witches were executed, at least four accused witches had died in prison, and one man, Giles Corey, had been pressed to death. About one to two hundred other persons were arrested and imprisoned on witchcraft charges. Two dogs were executed as suspected accomplices of witches.


http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/SAL_ACCT.HTM

However, contrary to the account given in the article above, neither dog died in Salem Town. One died in Andover and the other in Salem Village, now named Danvers. There also appears to be no foundation for the suggestion that a formal hanging was involved, or for suggestions that the dogs were suspected as witches or accomplices.

Quote:

Mr. Dudley Bradstreet, a Justice of Peace in Andover, having granted out Warrants against, and Committed Thirty or Forty to Prisons, for the supposed Witchcrafts, at length saw cause to forbear granting out any more Warrants. Soon after which he and his Wife were cried out of, himself was (by them) said to have killed Nine persons by Witchcraft, and found it his safest course to make his Escape.

A Dog being afflicted at Salem-Village, those that had the Spectral sight being sent for, they accused Mr. John Bradstreet (Brother to the Justice) that he afflicted the said Dog, and now rid upon him: He made his Escape into Pescattequa-Government, and the Dog was put to death, and was all of the Afflicted that suffered death.

At Andover, the Afflicted complained of a Dog, as afflicting of them, and would fall into their Fits at the Dogs looking upon them; the Dog was put to death.


At page 372: http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/BurNarr.html

No formal proceedings appear to have been commenced against the Bradstreet brothers, perhaps because of their social prominence as sons of a former governor of the colony.

 
Gaazy
40626.  Mon Dec 19, 2005 12:52 pm Reply with quote

My dog likes to pick up a stick to carry if he comes across one on the path when he's being walked.

Today he laid a stick aside to get himself thoroughly dirty in a stream, and then set off again. After about half a dozen steps, he stopped suddenly and returned to collect his stick. In other words he had forgotten and then remembered the stick, much as I might leave the house without my car keys.

It seems a craven anthropomorphisation but I can't interpret it in any other way.

 
tetsabb
40631.  Mon Dec 19, 2005 1:33 pm Reply with quote

BornWithoutABumhole wrote:
has anyone else heard this?

Apparently, any breed of dog should be able to mate with any other breed of dog and produce healthy offspring but I heard somewhere that it would be a physical impossibility for Jack Russells and Alsations to interbreed. A female Jack Russell trying to carry a male Alsation's puppies would kill her and the puppies too and a male Jack Russell trying to mate with a female Alsation would be a physical impossibility unless he was very clever and descended onto her from a tree and precariously balanced while he did the business while simultaneously fighting off other rival dogs who saw that she was on heat. This would probably mean if you put the two breeds on an island together and deserted them for a million years or so, they would not interbreed and remain entirely separate. Don't know if it's true or not, but it seems quite plausible.


When we mated a Sheltie bitch, she was much taller than her intended. But the breeder had a little stack of foldable mats for him to stand on. So a Jack Russell boy could be 'liftable-uppable' to get to, say an Alsatian or Labrador.
Graphic bit
The dog's penis expands once fully inside the bitch, while her vulva constricts to grip, so there should not be a problem in that regard.

I think I met a dog once that was the result of a JR getting to grips with a Lab: appealing little tyke.

 
QI Individual
40650.  Mon Dec 19, 2005 3:10 pm Reply with quote

Two very QI doggy facts:

In a way dogs are smarter than chimps!

Quote:
Dogs are more skillful than great apes at a number of tasks in which they must read human communicative signals indicating the location of hidden food. In this study, we found that wolves who were raised by humans do not show these same skills, whereas domestic dog puppies only a few weeks old, even those that have had little human contact, do show these skills. These findings suggest that during the process of domestication, dogs have been selected for a set of social-cognitive abilities that enable them to communicate with humans in unique ways.


And I must say that I have this Sheltie following me around almost every step I make which certainly doesn't miss a beat. Clever thing....

Source: Science

The article/research seems to be reprinted in 2005 and the full text is available Here.

Dogs are genetically very close related to humans. Much closer than initially was assumed.

Quote:
“Of the more than 5,500 mammals living today, dogs are arguably the most remarkable,” said senior author Eric Lander, director of the Broad Institute, professor of biology at MIT and systems biology at Harvard Medical School, and a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. “The incredible physical and behavioral diversity of dogs — from Chihuahuas to Great Danes – is encoded in their genomes. It can uniquely help us understand embryonic development, neurobiology, human disease and the basis of evolution.”

Similarities to humans

Dogs not only occupy a special place in human hearts, they also sit at a key branch point in the evolutionary tree relative to humans. By tracking evolution’s genetic footprints through the dog, human and mouse genomes, the scientists found that humans share more of their ancestral DNA with dogs than with mice, confirming the utility of dog genetics for understanding human disease.

Most importantly, the comparison revealed the regions of the human genome that are most highly preserved across mammals. Roughly 5% of the human genome has been well preserved by evolution over the past 100 million years and must encode important biological functions. The researchers discovered that the most highly conserved of these sequences are not randomly distributed throughout the genome. Instead, they are crowded around just a tiny fraction (about 1%) of the genes that encode crucial regulatory proteins involved in development (such as transcription factors or axon guidance receptors). “The clustering of regulatory sequences is incredibly interesting,” said Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, first author of the Nature paper and co-director of the genome sequencing and analysis program at Broad. “It means that a small subset of crucial human genes is under much more elaborate control than we had ever imagined.”

Differences between dog breeds

Dogs were domesticated from gray wolves as long as 100,000 years ago, but selective breeding over the past few centuries has made modern dog breeds a testament to biological diversity. Obvious examples include the contrasting body sizes of 6-pound Chihuahuas and 120-pound Great Danes, the hyperactivity of Jack Russell terriers relative to mild-mannered basset hounds, and the herding instincts of Shetland sheepdogs compared with the protective proclivity of dalmatians.

Efforts to create the genetic tools needed to map important genes in dogs have gained momentum over the last 15 years, and already include a partial survey of the poodle genome. More than two years ago, Lindblad-Toh, Lander, and their colleagues embarked on a two-part project to assemble a complete map of the dog genome. First, they acquired high-quality DNA sequence from a female boxer named “Tasha,” covering nearly 99% of the dog’s genome. Using this information as a genetic ‘compass,’ they then sampled the genomes of 10 different dog breeds and other related canine species, including the gray wolf and coyote. By comparing these dogs, they pinpointed ~2.5 million individual genetic differences among breeds, called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which serve as recognizable signposts that can be used to locate the genetic contributions to physical and behavioral traits, as well as disease.

Finally, the scientists used the SNP map to reconstruct how intense dog breeding has shaped the genome. They discovered that selective breeding carried large genomic regions of several million bases of DNA into breeds, creating ‘haplotype blocks’ that are ~100 times larger than seen in the human population. “The huge genomic regions should make it much easier to find the genes responsible for differences in body size, behavior and disease,” said Lander. “Such studies will need many fewer markers than for human studies. It should be like hitting the side of a barn.”

Mapping human disease-related genes in dogs

Breeding programs not only selected for desired traits, they also had the unintended consequence of predisposing many dog breeds to genetic diseases, including heart disease, cancer, blindness, cataracts, epilepsy, hip dysplasia and deafness. With the dog genome sequence and the SNP map, scientists around the world now have the tools to identify these disease genes.

Humans suffer from many of the same illnesses as their four-legged friends and even show similar symptoms, but the genetic underpinnings have proved difficult to trace. “The genetic contributions to many common diseases appear to be easier to uncover in dogs,” said Lindblad-Toh. “If so, it is a significant step forward in understanding the roots of genetic disease in both dogs and humans.”


Source: Nature

 
wibble the lobster
40658.  Mon Dec 19, 2005 3:41 pm Reply with quote

a relative has a lovely natured dog which is the product of a jack russell and a shitzu.

needless to mention the obvious name for this cross breed.

 
tetsabb
40668.  Mon Dec 19, 2005 4:23 pm Reply with quote

wibble the lobster wrote:
a relative has a lovely natured dog which is the product of a jack russell and a shitzu.

needless to mention the obvious name for this cross breed.


Russell Tzu?

 
gerontius grumpus
41186.  Wed Dec 21, 2005 3:41 pm Reply with quote

Canis Grumpi knows his left and right if there is a treat in the offing.

 

Page 3 of 5
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group