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Colin? What a load of pollacks.

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CB27
533357.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:28 am Reply with quote

I had a massive bag of frozen coley which I used to sometimes feed my cat (after cooking it of course - the fish, not the cat). Unfortunately I got left with lots of coley after Muschky died from a stroke recently. I tried cooking the fish in different ways and agree it's not exactly the best fish for cooking (plus I'm not a seafood fan), but I managed to make a palatable dish with concentrated sundried tomato, coconut cream and shallots, cooking the whole thing in a large wide pan over a slow fire and it wasn't too bad.

 
Sadurian Mike
533459.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 3:46 pm Reply with quote

People are too embarrassed to ask for pollock?

Are we treading on "faggots" territory again?

I admit that the name is ripe for humour, however; "Hello Mr Fishmonger, can I have a look at your pollock please?"

 
CB27
533552.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 6:53 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
"Hello Mr Fishmonger, can I have a look at your pollock please?"


That's just all the fish guts on the floor, we haven't had time to clean up yet.

 
nitwit02
533594.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:51 pm Reply with quote

Is Skate still a regular in UK fish 'n chip shops?

Also, how about Rock Salmon (Dogfish)?

 
Sadurian Mike
533595.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:53 pm Reply with quote

I'm afraid I don't eat fish so I have no idea.

Ask me one on pies or saveloys.

 
bobwilson
533600.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:00 pm Reply with quote

nitwit02 wrote:
Is Skate still a regular in UK fish 'n chip shops?

Also, how about Rock Salmon (Dogfish)?


Most fish'n'chip shops I know of do "fish" - there's not much in the way of statements about what type of fish it is.

 
nitwit02
533601.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:05 pm Reply with quote

So, these days you don't know what you are getting? Oh dear ....

 
bobwilson
533606.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:11 pm Reply with quote

nitwit02 wrote:
So, these days you don't know what you are getting? Oh dear ....


when was the last time you read the ingredients on a ready meal?

 
suze
533712.  Thu Apr 09, 2009 6:45 am Reply with quote

I can only really speak for the fish'n'chip shop which we go to.

Its menu includes cod, haddock, plaice, and rock as so named, and I've no reason to suppose that the fishes are not as described.

(The spiny dogfish aka rock is actually considerably more endangered than the cod, and there's been a campaign to get it removed from menus.)

 
CB27
533739.  Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:54 am Reply with quote

I'm not really a fish person either, though I do like steak fish such as shark and swordfish, but if you're ever in NW London there's a place called Skipjacks in Queensbury which isn't bad for fish food.

 
Starfish13
533751.  Thu Apr 09, 2009 9:14 am Reply with quote

In Scotland the 'default' chippy fish in your supper tends to be haddock, but in England it is usually cod. If you want something else, you tend to have to ask for it by name. I've had flying fish in Tobago and hoki in NZ when asking for fish and chips over there. Newcastle chippies always seem to do kipper in a bun as an item on the menu, which no-one else in the world offers.

 
bobwilson
534437.  Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:33 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Newcastle chippies always seem to do kipper in a bun


Austrian chippies now offer Kippr in a cellar (well salty and matured over about 20 years)

 
CB27
534454.  Fri Apr 10, 2009 10:47 pm Reply with quote

A few years back when I spent some time in the Caribbean, some beaches (not sure which islands they were) would have people selling deep fried shark served in a sort of fried bun and it was really delicious, probably the only time I actually loved seafood.

 
Starfish13
534653.  Sat Apr 11, 2009 3:05 pm Reply with quote

I was reading today about sharks, in particular Greenland shark. This is the one that Icelanders like to bury in a pit and wait until it rots before they eat it. But apparently the flesh is so concentrated in ammonia that eating is fresh is poisonous. The Inuits boil it for half a day, in several changes of water, then feed it to their dogs. I think that we're rather lucky to have colin and chips, ourselves.

 
Leith
535636.  Mon Apr 13, 2009 5:48 pm Reply with quote

Startfish13 wrote:
Pollack are also variously called pollock, saithe, coley, coalfish, Boston blueys and lythe.

It's possible I may be named after a pollack. I've seen a few suggested etymologies for the name of 'Leith', one of which is that it is a corruption of the Latin 'Lyth' or 'Lythe'.

See leithmuseum.ca: Definition of the word 'Leith' (though if the port of Leith is in fact named after a type fish, I think that would make it pretty unusual among UK place names).

 

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