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Colin? What a load of pollacks.

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Starfish13
533295.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 7:56 am Reply with quote

Shoppers in Sainsbury's supermarket are keen to help the plight of cod stocks in the UK, but are too embarrassed to ask for pollack by name. So the chain decided that the fish could do with a makeover, and have renamed it 'Colin' (pronounced as in Powell and not McRae) after the French name for the fish.

Pollack are also variously called pollock, saithe, coley, coalfish, Boston blueys and lythe. Is it really embarrassment that stops people asking for it, or are they food snobs?

And anyway, as all marine biologists know, all pollack are called Jackson.

 
suze
533328.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 10:28 am Reply with quote

That last bit caused me to do an actual LOL !

Until recent years it's primarily been seen as cat food, and I'm sure I've bought it for that purpose, frozen and sold as "coley". Is that where the snobbery comes in - supermarkets won't sell it under that name because they don't want to admit that it's the same stuff?

As I noted when we discussed this fish once before, the main reason I won't buy it is that it doesn't taste of anything. (That it's grey doesn't really help either, but I could rise above that if it tasted nice.)

 
legspin
533350.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:10 am Reply with quote

One of the great staples of the Dublin Chipper is the Smoked Cod. What your average punter doesn't realise that they have been using pollock for 20 years instead.

 
CB27
533357.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:28 am Reply with quote

I had a massive bag of frozen coley which I used to sometimes feed my cat (after cooking it of course - the fish, not the cat). Unfortunately I got left with lots of coley after Muschky died from a stroke recently. I tried cooking the fish in different ways and agree it's not exactly the best fish for cooking (plus I'm not a seafood fan), but I managed to make a palatable dish with concentrated sundried tomato, coconut cream and shallots, cooking the whole thing in a large wide pan over a slow fire and it wasn't too bad.

 
Sadurian Mike
533459.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 3:46 pm Reply with quote

People are too embarrassed to ask for pollock?

Are we treading on "faggots" territory again?

I admit that the name is ripe for humour, however; "Hello Mr Fishmonger, can I have a look at your pollock please?"

 
CB27
533552.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 6:53 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
"Hello Mr Fishmonger, can I have a look at your pollock please?"


That's just all the fish guts on the floor, we haven't had time to clean up yet.

 
nitwit02
533594.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:51 pm Reply with quote

Is Skate still a regular in UK fish 'n chip shops?

Also, how about Rock Salmon (Dogfish)?

 
Sadurian Mike
533595.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:53 pm Reply with quote

I'm afraid I don't eat fish so I have no idea.

Ask me one on pies or saveloys.

 
bobwilson
533600.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:00 pm Reply with quote

nitwit02 wrote:
Is Skate still a regular in UK fish 'n chip shops?

Also, how about Rock Salmon (Dogfish)?


Most fish'n'chip shops I know of do "fish" - there's not much in the way of statements about what type of fish it is.

 
nitwit02
533601.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:05 pm Reply with quote

So, these days you don't know what you are getting? Oh dear ....

 
bobwilson
533606.  Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:11 pm Reply with quote

nitwit02 wrote:
So, these days you don't know what you are getting? Oh dear ....


when was the last time you read the ingredients on a ready meal?

 
suze
533712.  Thu Apr 09, 2009 6:45 am Reply with quote

I can only really speak for the fish'n'chip shop which we go to.

Its menu includes cod, haddock, plaice, and rock as so named, and I've no reason to suppose that the fishes are not as described.

(The spiny dogfish aka rock is actually considerably more endangered than the cod, and there's been a campaign to get it removed from menus.)

 
CB27
533739.  Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:54 am Reply with quote

I'm not really a fish person either, though I do like steak fish such as shark and swordfish, but if you're ever in NW London there's a place called Skipjacks in Queensbury which isn't bad for fish food.

 
Starfish13
533751.  Thu Apr 09, 2009 9:14 am Reply with quote

In Scotland the 'default' chippy fish in your supper tends to be haddock, but in England it is usually cod. If you want something else, you tend to have to ask for it by name. I've had flying fish in Tobago and hoki in NZ when asking for fish and chips over there. Newcastle chippies always seem to do kipper in a bun as an item on the menu, which no-one else in the world offers.

 
bobwilson
534437.  Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:33 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Newcastle chippies always seem to do kipper in a bun


Austrian chippies now offer Kippr in a cellar (well salty and matured over about 20 years)

 

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