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Fletchery and Bowyery

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QoW
199073.  Fri Aug 10, 2007 6:40 am Reply with quote

Both integral to the art of toxophily, better known as archery.

Fletching/fletchery is the name given to the skill of arrow-making; more specifically the careful placement of feathers to stabilise and/or add spin/control to arrows in flight.

Bowyery is what it sounds like; the art of making longbows. Yew was and still is the traditional wood of choice for this, with ash coming a close second. Modern bow manufacture utilises other woods in a laminate technique as the best kind of yew is both hard to find and accordingly very expensive. Ash is also favourite for arrows, along with pine and cedar. Bowyery is a risky profession:yew wood is poisonous even as dust, and can cause temporary blindness and other adverse reactions.

These traditional skills have given us the surnames Fletcher and Bowyer, just as other crafts were the origin of names like Cooper, Wheelwright and Weaver.

 
Tas
199079.  Fri Aug 10, 2007 6:47 am Reply with quote

Quote:
These traditional skills have given us the surnames Fletcher and Bowyer, just as other crafts were the origin of names like Cooper, Wheelwright and Weaver.


Let us not forget Smith...

When fletching an arrow, it is important that the feathers are set so the leading edges faxe backwards. I once saw an arrow incorrectly fletched, with the feather cut incorrectly (or backwards as it were). When loosed from the bow, it produced an incredible buzzing sound due to the airflow through the fletching.

:-)

Tas

 
markvent
199100.  Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:33 am Reply with quote

. .


Last edited by markvent on Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:32 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
markvent
199110.  Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:50 am Reply with quote

. .


Last edited by markvent on Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:33 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Tas
199148.  Fri Aug 10, 2007 9:44 am Reply with quote

However, the cock feather is the one at ninety-degrees to the bow string, with the other two feathers runng roughly parallel to the string (not quite though. When the arrow is loosed and travels past the bow stave, the feathers will brush the timber).

:-)

Tas

 
mckeonj
199179.  Fri Aug 10, 2007 11:55 am Reply with quote

There is also a surname Thrower: would this have anything to do with the related art of throwing spears.
Apparently spears hurled with a throwing stick exhibit the same bending action as arrows in flight, by which some of the energy imparted is released during flight, extending the range.

 
gerontius grumpus
199869.  Mon Aug 13, 2007 5:21 pm Reply with quote

Isn't Thrower more akin to Potter?

 
Flash
199879.  Mon Aug 13, 2007 6:16 pm Reply with quote

markvent wrote:
Cock in this sense means to tilt or turn, for example "he cocked his hat"


Mark - I had always assumed that the cock feather was so called because it is coloured and so must have come from a cock bird, but your explanation feels better, I must say. Do we have evidence for it?

 
96aelw
199885.  Mon Aug 13, 2007 6:53 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:
Isn't Thrower more akin to Potter?


The two surname dictionaries I have to hand (a Brewer's Names of People, Places and Things and a rather elderly Penguin) agree with you there, sir, although both also raise the possibility of that it might also refer to a "silk thrower", being a person who makes raw silk into thread.

 
Tas
199952.  Tue Aug 14, 2007 4:40 am Reply with quote

The cock arrow does not HAVE to be coloured, but if it was, it would make the nocking of the arrow correctly a little easier in battle. Having the arrow incorrectly nocked can decrease the power and accuracy of the shot a little. Over distance this small deviation can result in a poor shot.

:-)

Tas

 
markvent
200071.  Tue Aug 14, 2007 7:38 am Reply with quote

. .


Last edited by markvent on Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:35 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
dr.bob
200072.  Tue Aug 14, 2007 7:43 am Reply with quote

markvent wrote:
"I have been this Year of God preaching against the Vanity of Women, yet I see my own Daughter in the Kirk Even now have as high a Cockup as any of you all." -- 1692 Scottish Presbyterian Eloquence pg 129 (1762)


Are you sure he was talking about her hat? ;-)

 
ali
200078.  Tue Aug 14, 2007 7:55 am Reply with quote

I'm sure he must have been. As Burns wrote:

When first my brave Johnie lad came to this town,
He had a blue bonnet that wanted the crown;
But now he has gotten a hat and a feather,
Hey, brave Johnie lad, cock up your beaver!

Cock up your beaver, and cock it fu' sprush,
We'll over the border, and gie them a brush;
There's somebody there we'll teach better behaviour,
Hey, brave Johnie lad, cock up your beaver!

 
dr.bob
200100.  Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:48 am Reply with quote

ali wrote:
Hey, brave Johnie lad, cock up your beaver!


I'd just like you to know that snorting your tea out of your nose and all over your keyboard is not a professional thing to do at work!

Now I need to go and find a damp cloth.

 
Tas
200122.  Tue Aug 14, 2007 9:51 am Reply with quote

And that is your reason for a sticky keyboard, Dr B?

Chinny-reckon!!!!

(Apologies to those too old/too young to recognise that phrase stating disbelief).

:-)

Tas

 

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