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#QIParty - @qikipedia's Twitter Follow-ups

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sally carr
1024916.  Thu Sep 26, 2013 5:15 pm Reply with quote

My nan always put clean webs on cuts.

 
julesies
1028535.  Sun Oct 13, 2013 12:08 pm Reply with quote

In reference to the tweet: "Being drunk makes you smarter: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053810012000037"

Some things in that article are really great. Like this part in the methods: "Participants watched an animated feature film (Ratatouille) while they consumed the alcoholic beverages." I think the best part though was that they concluded that alcohol makes you more creative because it causes you to "zone out."

 
joe.1888
1045280.  Thu Jan 02, 2014 7:16 pm Reply with quote

After reading the tweet
The QI Elves ‏@qikipedia 1 Jan

When the first man to have flown a plane died, the man who would be the first to walk on the moon was 17.

It got me searching and i found

Wright bros made 1st flight 1903. Konstantin Tsiolkovsky published The Exploration Of Cosmic Space by Means of Reaction Devices

Tsiolkovsky calculated, using the Tsiolkovsky equation,[8]:1 that the horizontal speed required for a minimal orbit around the Earth is 8,000 m/s (5 miles per second) and that this could be achieved by means of a multistage rocket fueled by liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen.

In 1903 he published an article "Investigation of Outer Space Rocket Devices," in which for the first time it was proved that a rocket could perform space flight.

Granted I used wikipedia.

 
julesies
1056431.  Sun Feb 16, 2014 1:36 pm Reply with quote

About today's tweet: "Plant grow faster if you talk to them in a Geordie accent."

You don't actually believe that, do you?

 
tetsabb
1056528.  Sun Feb 16, 2014 10:44 pm Reply with quote

Why aye, mon!

 
CB27
1056927.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:16 am Reply with quote

This fact is one that's been tested and "proved" by Chris Bonnett.

Chris planted 10 separate test groups, each consisting of a mix of around 100 different bedding plants.

The groups were:

TOWIE - Chris and his team spoke to this group in their own accents and the plants were played episodes of TOWIE, as well as music from Blur and Depeche Mode.

CHELSEA SET - The team spoke to these plants in an upper class accent, and played episodes of Made In Chelsea, as well as music by the likes of Florence Welch.

EMMERDALE - The team used Yorkshire accents and played episodes of Emmerdale and music from Pulp and Kaiser Chiefs.

WELSH - These had episodes of Pobol y Cym and music from Tom Jones, Charlotte Church and Kathryn Jenkins played to them.

SCOUSERS - The team spoke to the plants in scouse accents, and played episodes of Desperate Scousewives and Brookside, as well as music from The Beatles, Echo and the Bunnymen and The Zutons.

CORONATION STREET - Spoken to in a north west accent, played episodes of Corrie, and music from Oasis, New Order, The Stone Roses and Happy Mondays.

TYNESIDE - Spoken to in a north east accent, played episodes of Geordie Shore, and music from Cheryl Cole and Ant and Decís PJ and Duncan album.

SCOTTISH - Spoken to in a Glasgow accent, and played music by The Proclaimers and Susan Boyle.

AUSTRALIAN - Sopken to in an Aussie accent, played episodes of Neighbours and Home & Away, and music frmo Kylie Minogue and Rolf Harris.

AMERICAN - Spoken to with American accents, played episodes of Desperate Housewives and Friends, and music from Bruce Springsteen and Michael Jackson.

This test went on for a whole summer (my god, these people have too much time on their hands). The Geordie and Welsh groups did best, most others were in the average, while Scottish, Chelsea and Coronation Street did worst.

 
swot
1056932.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:24 am Reply with quote

Were they all spoken to for the same amount of time? Speaking to plants would help a bit, because people exhale moist air, which would help (in some small way) to keep the leaves moist.

 
'yorz
1056938.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:28 am Reply with quote

Which reminds me of my personal observation that Finnish is spoken while breathing out as well as breathing in. Which is unusual.

 
Efros
1056944.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:33 am Reply with quote

People from some areas of the North of Scotland do that too.

 
suze
1057008.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 11:50 am Reply with quote

Most speech is done while breathing out; it is speaking while breathing in which is uncommon.

Speakers of the Scandiwegian languages (including Finnish on this occasion) sometimes speak while breathing in, and so do Brazilian speakers of Portuguese. It has been claimed - although it has not been recorded and the linguistic community is rather skeptical - that older women among the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona speak only when breathing in.

As for English, ingressive speech is sometimes to be heard in the Celtic fringes, but rarely for more than one word at a time because English speakers find it quite hard to do. Jenny will know more about this than I, but the literature talks about something called the "Maine 'ayup'", which is often spoken ingressively and which non-Maineacs find it all but impossible to imitate.

 
julesies
1057010.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 11:54 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
This fact is one that's been tested and "proved" by Chris Bonnett.

Yes, I had read the article. Let me go into the reasons why you shouldn't believe this:

First and foremost, this is based on the idea that plants do better when people talk to them. This has not been proven. No rigorous, peer-reviewed experiment has confirmed this. It's probably not been tested by scientists because ideas like this were popularized by the book The Secret Life of Plants which is crazy bullshit. This is similar to the idea that plants like music and prefer classical to rock, also bullshit.

But let's assume that human speech does somehow help plants grow and just examine Bonnett's experiment. Let me go through the things wrong with it:

1) No replicates. Bonnett did this once. Just once! The best way to correct for batch effect is to do replicates. Without replicates, I don't believe a word.

2) He used different music and television shows to play the accents. This introduces a whole new set of problems. What about all of the background noise in the television shows? One may take place in New York while another takes place in a rural area. Very different background noises. And what about the different styles of music (if you believe that plants prefer some music over other, which Bonnett probably does)? He's comparing Florence Welch and Michael Jackson and saying that the ONLY difference between the two is the accent.

3) His conclusions are based on 3cm differences from the mean. For plants, this seems negligible. And how do I know that the groups that did the best and the groups that did the worst don't correlate with location in the garden? This goes back to batch effect which I mentioned in #1, and this could be fixed by replicates in which the location of each group was randomly rearranged. But replicates were never done.

I'll conclude with this quote from the BBC article:
Quote:
Guy Barter from the Royal Horticultural Society says he does not believe "a word of it".

"First of all there is no real mechanism by which music could affect plants," he said. "Secondly no-one's ever produced the slightest bit of proof that would withstand scientific scrutiny.

"Last time it came up we got our plant physiologist to search the academic papers and she drew a blank."

He said plants "vary enormously" and it is hard to "disentangle chance and natural variation" from whatever is done to them as part of an experiment.

 
Jenny
1057023.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:05 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:


As for English, ingressive speech is sometimes to be heard in the Celtic fringes, but rarely for more than one word at a time because English speakers find it quite hard to do. Jenny will know more about this than I, but the literature talks about something called the "Maine 'ayup'", which is often spoken ingressively and which non-Maineacs find it all but impossible to imitate.


It's "ayuh" and you can hear it on this Youtube video, with the ingressive version after the 1 minute mark.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftZYb5HGDlI

 
Efros
1057031.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:25 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Most speech is done while breathing out; it is speaking while breathing in which is uncommon.

Speakers of the Scandiwegian languages (including Finnish on this occasion) sometimes speak while breathing in, and so do Brazilian speakers of Portuguese. It has been claimed - although it has not been recorded and the linguistic community is rather skeptical - that older women among the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona speak only when breathing in.

As for English, ingressive speech is sometimes to be heard in the Celtic fringes, but rarely for more than one word at a time because English speakers find it quite hard to do. Jenny will know more about this than I, but the literature talks about something called the "Maine 'ayup'", which is often spoken ingressively and which non-Maineacs find it all but impossible to imitate.


People from Wick and Thurso say yes ingressively.

 
CB27
1057650.  Thu Feb 20, 2014 2:30 pm Reply with quote

julesies wrote:
CB27 wrote:
This fact is one that's been tested and "proved" by Chris Bonnett.

Yes, I had read the article. Let me go into the reasons why you shouldn't believe this:...

I didn't bother going into detail, I just used quote marks to show I thought it was a bit of ridiculously silly stuff :)

 
CharliesDragon
1121953.  Wed Mar 04, 2015 11:47 am Reply with quote

The Elves are suggesting the blanket was invented by a Thomas Blanket (link) and my first reaction was "You gotta be kidding me." They obviously think they are regarded as a good source of information and are now testing it to see what people will fall for.

I immediately went to OED.com, which said that is a dirty, dirty lie. (For some strange reason I can't search the OED now without being a paying subscriber, although I could last night.)

I'm willing to go as far as that Thomas Blanket might have found a better way of making blankets/coverings, but the word still derives from the French blanch.


Last edited by CharliesDragon on Wed Mar 04, 2015 12:08 pm; edited 1 time in total

 

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