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Gaffe (mistakes)

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Ian Dunn
388950.  Sat Aug 02, 2008 6:56 am Reply with quote

A thread dedicated to mistakes and errors.

To get the ball rolling, a story reported in The Australian claims that a newspaper successfully smuggled an oversized bag past Qantas check-in and security screening. The bag was almost transferred, but luckily the alarm was raised. The odd thing with the bag was that the word "BOMB" was written across it.

Qantas can't seem to get anything right recently. First, one of their planes nearly blows up, and now the security staff are so stupid they would probably let a plane blow up anyway.


Last edited by Ian Dunn on Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:10 am; edited 1 time in total

 
simonp
388953.  Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:07 am Reply with quote

Gaffe –noun
a social blunder; faux pas.

Gaff

noun 1. an iron hook with a handle for landing large fish.
2. the spur on a climbing iron, esp. as used by telephone linemen.
3. Nautical. a spar rising aft from a mast to support the head of a quadrilateral fore-and-aft sail (gaff sail).
4. a metal spur for a gamecock.
–verb (used with object) 5. to hook or land (a fish) with a gaff.


S= Dictionary.com

:-)

Or was it a deliberate mistake? :-)

 
Ian Dunn
388956.  Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:11 am Reply with quote

simonp wrote:
S= Dictionary.com

:-)

Or was it a deliberate mistake? :-)


Yes was deliberate (He said nervously).

 
mckeonj
388963.  Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:43 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
simonp wrote:
S= Dictionary.com

:-)

Or was it a deliberate mistake? :-)


Yes was deliberate (He said nervously).

Are you nervous because you are not sure whether you have spelt 'deliberite' properly?

 
soup
388964.  Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:47 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:

Are you nervous because you are not sure whether you have spelt 'deliberite' properly?


He is right it is spelt "ATE" or have I had a sense of humour breakdown (again)?

 
markvent
388970.  Sat Aug 02, 2008 8:20 am Reply with quote

A Magician will often used a "gaffe" or a "gimmick" both are essentially the means by which the effect is accomplished.

There are subtle differences between a gaffe and a gimmick ..

A "gaffed" playing card might be one with a blank face, one that has a back design on both sides, is blank on both sides etc.

A "gimmicked" playing card is one that has been altered so as to aid the magician performing a trick. as an example two cards which are glued together at one end and free at the other end.

I suppose the simplest definition is that a gaffe makes the sleight of hand easier, a gimmick removes the need for sleight of hand entirely.

Mark.

 
RLDavies
389128.  Sun Aug 03, 2008 7:20 am Reply with quote

A magician's gimmick is a gaff, not a gaffe. But most magicians can't spell.

"Gaff" is Cockney slang for a house, home, or dwelling-place.

To "blow the gaff" is to spill the beans, let a secret become known, especially if this ruins someone's plans.

Basically, a mistake is a gaffe, and any other meaning is spelled without the e.

 
error_no_738
389364.  Mon Aug 04, 2008 6:58 am Reply with quote

Or, a gaffe is almost anything that Prince Philip has ever said to anyone.

Ever.

 
Ian Dunn
389378.  Mon Aug 04, 2008 7:27 am Reply with quote

To quote Prince Philip, "Dontopedalogy is the science of opening your mouth and putting your foot in it, a science which I have practiced for a good many years."

Here are some of quote from the Phil the Greek:

To a Briton living in Hungary.

Quote:
"You can't have been here long, you haven't got a potbelly."


To British sutdents in China.

Quote:
"You shouldn't stay here too long or you'll turn slitty-eyed."


To a Washington Embassy reception for Commonwealth members.

Quote:
"Are you Indian or Pakistani? I can never tell the difference between you chaps."


When opening an annexe to Vancouver City Hall.

Quote:
"I declare this thing open - whatever it is."


To a wealthy Cayman Islander.

Quote:
"Aren't most of you descended from priates?"


During the 2002 Royal Jubilee Tour.

Quote:
"If you travel as much as we do, you appreciate how much more comfortable aircraft have become. Unless you travel in something called economy class, which sounds ghastly."


To Ivan Brim, Djabugay Elder at Tjapukai Aboriginal Park in 2002.

Quote:
"Are you still throwing spears at other tribes?"


To a visiting French minister of the interior.

Quote:
"It's too bad you sent your royal family to the guillotine, isn't it?"


On the role of the monarchy.

Quote:
"The monarchy system adds gaiety to politics."


Upon accepting a small gift from an indigenous Kenyan woman.

Quote:
"You are a woman, aren't you?"


When asked by a room full of press agents in 1967 if he would ever visit Russia.

Quote:
"The bastards murdered half my family."


To a Scottish driving instructor.

Quote:
"How do you keep the natives off the booze long enough to get them to pass the tests?"


On French Canadians during a visit to Toronto.

Quote:
"I can't understand a word the say. They slur all their words."


To a student who had been trekking Papua New Guinea in 1998.

Quote:
"You managed not to get eaten then."


To Tom Jones at the Royal Variety Performance in 1969.

Quote:
"Have you been gargling with pebbles?"


When visiting the University of Salford.

Quote:
"The best thing to do with a degree is to forget it."


On one last note, here is a quote from Prince Charles, when he unveiled a bust of Prince Philip at the Royal Thames Yacht Club.

Quote:
"I now complete the process of helping my father to expose himself."


Source: Foolish Words: The Most Stupid Words Ever Spoken by Laura Ward.

 
mckeonj
389386.  Mon Aug 04, 2008 8:00 am Reply with quote

One of my memorable gaffes was to hold up Prince Philip's car while on traffic duty outside Ascot racecourse; I did not recognise him. No words were spoken, but the glare I got haunts me still. I'd say the left eye has a killing range of at least 50 yards.

 
mckeonj
389388.  Mon Aug 04, 2008 8:06 am Reply with quote

shandygaff is the long original form of 'shandy', which is a mixture of beer and lemonade. Most dictionaries simply say "origin unknown".
Any suggestions?
I have a feeling that it might be Dutch in origin, and came in by sea, like 'scrimshaw'.

 
markvent
391969.  Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:02 am Reply with quote

. .


Last edited by markvent on Fri Jan 29, 2010 1:57 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
392006.  Mon Aug 11, 2008 1:02 pm Reply with quote

The last one isn't quite as daft as it sounds (although it is pretty bloody daft I'll give you), given that there is an association between Dracula and Whitby.

 
Arcane
392223.  Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:00 am Reply with quote

"Which way is north in Australia?" - An entry on an Australian Information website leading up to the 2000 Olympics.

 
Arcane
392224.  Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:02 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:


Qantas can't seem to get anything right recently.

No news to us here in Australia. We've know that for ages!

Out of the mouths of babes: With all the negative goings on re Qantas, when my husband decided recently to organise a New Zealand holliday, my nine year old daughter said fearfully "Please tell me we're not flying Qantas".

Our national airline.... huzzaaaaaah.

*doesn't wave little flag*

 

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