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Tuva

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Posital
498653.  Fri Feb 06, 2009 6:30 pm Reply with quote

Tannu Tuva - annexed(?) by Russian Federation - the destination of Richard Feynman (Nobel Laureate) in his quest to find the source of a stamp with the name Kyzyl on it.
Kyzyl - capital near the centre of asia.

 
misterchris
498973.  Sat Feb 07, 2009 10:04 am Reply with quote

In the 1920s and 1930s, postage stamps from Tuva were issued. Many philatelists, including famous physicist Richard Feynman, have been fascinated with the far-away and obscure land of Tuva because of these stamps. The stamps were issued mainly during the brief period of Tuvan independence, and had many philatelists in a furor, as they did not conform to philatelic standards. Feynman's efforts to reach Tuva are chronicled in the book Tuva or Bust! and the video 'The Quest For Tannu Tuva: Richard Feynman - The Last Journey of a Genius' (1988) which can be viewed online through Google Video.

 
misterchris
498974.  Sat Feb 07, 2009 10:05 am Reply with quote

According to Ilya Zakharov of Moscow's Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, genetic evidence suggests that the modern Tuvan people are the closest genetic relatives to the native peoples of North and South America.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuva

 
misterchris
498976.  Sat Feb 07, 2009 10:07 am Reply with quote



These stamps are examples of the many bogus Tuva stamps - the writing should be in cyrrilic

http://www.si-usa.com/tuva/

 
suze
499170.  Sat Feb 07, 2009 12:50 pm Reply with quote

Just so's you know what to look for, here are a couple of real ones.

 
misterchris
499189.  Sat Feb 07, 2009 1:22 pm Reply with quote

The Richard Feynman video

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1247754.  Mon Sep 04, 2017 1:31 pm Reply with quote

misterchris wrote:
In the 1920s and 1930s, postage stamps from Tuva were issued. Many philatelists, including famous physicist Richard Feynman, have been fascinated with the far-away and obscure land of Tuva because of these stamps. The stamps were issued mainly during the brief period of Tuvan independence, and had many philatelists in a furor, as they did not conform to philatelic standards. Feynman's efforts to reach Tuva are chronicled in the book Tuva or Bust! and the video 'The Quest For Tannu Tuva: Richard Feynman - The Last Journey of a Genius' (1988) which can be viewed online through Google Video.


Tuva never joined the UPU and, consequently, these stamps could not be used overseas.

 
suze
1247767.  Mon Sep 04, 2017 3:35 pm Reply with quote

It was for a long time the position of Messrs Stanley Gibbons that these stamps had never even been to Tuva. They were printed in Moscow, canceled to order* in Moscow, and then sold into the philatelic trade from Moscow. It was Moscow rather than Tuva which profited from this.

More recently it has been established that a small number of stamps really were used for mail within Tuva, and used envelopes bearing used stamps do come onto the market from time to time. In an exception to the usual principle, these are worth considerably more to collectors than unused stamps with the original gum.


* This is a thing with pretty stamps which are intended more for collectors than for using on actual mail. The stamps are postmarked at the printers so that they are not valid for use on mail, and then sold to stamp dealers at well below face value. The cancellation is usually a neat one quarter circle in one corner of the stamp, and is applied less heavily than normal so as not to obliterate the design.

The United Arab Emirates used to go further still and actually print the cancellation as part of the stamp. But Messrs Stanley Gibbons didn't approve of this and declined to include such stamps in its catalogues, which convinced the UAE to stop doing it.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1247969.  Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:53 am Reply with quote

Here, have some Tuvan Throat Metal:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlh-qwPzXCE

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
monzac
1247971.  Wed Sep 06, 2017 4:23 am Reply with quote

Richard Feynman and Tuvan throat music come together in Back Tuva Future.

Feynman can be heard chanting and drumming in track one. He also contributed to other tracks. This is a fusion album of Tuvan and western music, which includes contributions from Willie Nelson, Randy Scruggs and Bill Miller.

 
'yorz
1247975.  Wed Sep 06, 2017 4:48 am Reply with quote

Sainkho Namtchylak is one of the most famous Tuvan singers of Khöömei.

 
monzac
1247977.  Wed Sep 06, 2017 4:59 am Reply with quote

Here is Kongar-ol Ondar performing on the Late Show with David Letterman. Ondar's given name, Kongar-ol, means 'loud boy'.

I prefer this more traditional style of throat singing to the music on Back Tuva Future, but, hey, it has Feynman! (... and my copy was a present from my daughter.)

There are four classifications of throat singing. These are covered well in the documentary Genghis Blues, which tracks blues singer Paul Pena's travels to Tuva to learn the singing style.


Last edited by monzac on Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:27 am; edited 1 time in total

 
monzac
1247981.  Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:22 am Reply with quote

Ooh, hadn't heard Sainkho Namtchylak till now. This sample is very jazz influenced. I'll have to listen to that album :)

Here's Huun-Huur-Tu with the toe tapping Aa-shuu dekei-oo.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1248118.  Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:03 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
It was for a long time the position of Messrs Stanley Gibbons that these stamps had never even been to Tuva. They were printed in Moscow, canceled to order* in Moscow, and then sold into the philatelic trade from Moscow. It was Moscow rather than Tuva which profited from this.

More recently it has been established that a small number of stamps really were used for mail within Tuva, and used envelopes bearing used stamps do come onto the market from time to time. In an exception to the usual principle, these are worth considerably more to collectors than unused stamps with the original gum.


* This is a thing with pretty stamps which are intended more for collectors than for using on actual mail. The stamps are postmarked at the printers so that they are not valid for use on mail, and then sold to stamp dealers at well below face value. The cancellation is usually a neat one quarter circle in one corner of the stamp, and is applied less heavily than normal so as not to obliterate the design.

The United Arab Emirates used to go further still and actually print the cancellation as part of the stamp. But Messrs Stanley Gibbons didn't approve of this and declined to include such stamps in its catalogues, which convinced the UAE to stop doing it.


In fact the images on the stamps may not be entirely representative of Tuvan life. One represented a camel racing alongside Tuva's railway. There is still no railway in Tuva! One featured an airship hovering over a man on horseback yet there is no evidence that an airship ever visited Tuva at that time.

You are right, however, in saying that there is evidence of genuine postal use. As a philatelist I own at least one with a genuine postmark.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postage_stamps_and_postal_history_of_Tannu_Tuva

 

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