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Should Stephen Fry rectify this by appearing naked and covered in margarine? Bought from the UK?
Yes
33%
 33%  [ 5 ]
No
66%
 66%  [ 10 ]
Total Votes : 15

markwithey
492819.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:40 pm Reply with quote

What is this bumpf about not being able to buy margarine? Sainsbury's sell margarine. Tesco sell margarine. Asda sell margarine.

EVERYWHERE SELLS MARGARINE.

Please please please can someone tell me where this horrible, margarine-degrading, QI fuelled piece of bugger balls has come from?

It's not right, it's not true, it's not big AND IT'S NOT CLEVER.

Yours very annoyed,

Mark Withey

Too much time on hands.

PS can I please have a job as a researcher? Thanks.

 
Posital
492830.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:54 pm Reply with quote

I dunno why they said that - I wish it were true.

http://www.margarine.org.uk/

Home of the Margarine and Spreads Association - no name change.

I think it was added so he could say "palm off"...

 
Ion Zone
492833.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:59 pm Reply with quote

What's this all about? Is Fry bathing in lard? :}

 
Southpaw
492837.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:04 pm Reply with quote

What are colloquially referred to as margarines are not 'true' margarines, which contain at least 90% fat. The 'margarines' you can buy in the supermarkets are in fact referred to as 'low-fat spreads'.

 
Ion Zone
492851.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:19 pm Reply with quote

It's still margarine, i.e. synthetic butter. QI is encouraging a diferent type of ignorence here.

 
markwithey
492852.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:21 pm Reply with quote

I agree with Ion Zone.

 
suze
492853.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:21 pm Reply with quote

That website hasn't been updated since 2003 though, so it may just be that no one has ever gotten around to taking it down.

The UK Spreads Association doesn't seem to have a website under its new name, but you can see a mention of the body in this article from the Daily Telegraph.

As for the main claim, the research forum does provide a source for it, but I haven't seen that source myself so shall reserve judgment for now.

Stephen mentioned some American states requiring margarine to be a colour other than yellow. That was certainly the case in Canada as well. Margarine was banned altogether in Canada until 1948, but that ban was lifted in the face of vast quantities of smuggled Newfoundland margarine (made from whale oil) entering the country. The dairy lobby had its say though, and only last year was yellow margarine legalized in Québec - in recent years it had been white, but at one time it was a lurid orange/red.

 
markwithey
492855.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:23 pm Reply with quote

Yeah - what she said too.

 
Southpaw
492864.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:37 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
It's still margarine, i.e. synthetic butter. QI is encouraging a diferent type of ignorence here.


'Synthetic Butter' is your definition of margarine, not the 'official' definition, at least that's what the question is based on.

Obviously for all practical purposes the yellowish gak you spread on your sandwiches is (I hope) margarine.

 
Posital
492905.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:16 pm Reply with quote

Just for clarification - margarine does not have a tall blue hair-do - in case anyone is confused.

 
markwithey
492908.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:18 pm Reply with quote

Yes it does!

 
Bondee
492912.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:21 pm Reply with quote

Posital wrote:
Just for clarification - margarine does not have a tall blue hair-do - in case anyone is confused.


 
exnihilo
492924.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:27 pm Reply with quote

Ion Zone wrote:
It's still margarine, i.e. synthetic butter. QI is encouraging a diferent type of ignorence here.


Margarine was originally a trade name, if Hippolyte Mège-Mouriés were with us today you can bet he'd have "Margarine Brand Spread" on his tubs to ensure he kept his trade name and it didn't become generic. As it is, true margarine has gone the way of the dodo and we're left with a range of low fat spreads. So, I'm a bit puzzled by the conclusion you've reached.

 
Posital
492930.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:33 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Margarine is defined in law as the product obtained from vegetable and/or animal fats with a fat content of more that 80%, but less than 90%. It is a solid emulsion of water in oil. Margarine has to be produced in accordance with the Spreadable Fats (Marketing Standards) Regulations 1995.


Margarine must contain certain ingredients in certain quantities:
• Fat content – minimum 80%, but less that 90%
• Milk fat content – maximum 3% of total fat
• Vitamin A – 940-960 IU per ounce (800-1000µg per 100g)
• Vitamin D – 80-100 IU of vitamin D per ounce (7.05-8.82µg per 100g)


Spreads have a similar composition to margarine but are usually lower in fat. For example, low fat spreads (defined as a spread with 40g fat/100g) and some spreads which contain 75% fat cannot be called margarine as they do not meet the minimum fat level requirement. Water is used to bulk out these spreads. Very low fat spreads are unsuitable for frying and baking but they are suitable for spreading directly out of the refrigerator. Spreads may also be fortified (e.g. with vitamin A and D) at levels similar to margarine, although this is not required by law.


See: http://www.nutrition.org.uk/home.asp?siteId=43&sectionId=424&subSectionId=322&parentSection=299&which=1

 
markwithey
492938.  Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:43 pm Reply with quote

Margarine - available in shops near you. NOW!

 

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