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A new chess piece?

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Cleverina Clogs
480045.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 7:04 am Reply with quote

I'm not sure where I heard about this but was there talk of introducing a new chess piece to the game?

I think it was/is supposed to be called 'the dauphin' and can move in the same way as the Queen but only two squares at a time.

Is this complete drivel or is there some truth in the matter?

 
Alfred E Neuman
480047.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 7:13 am Reply with quote

It might be a variant - there are many variants with different rules, but the basic game remains unchanged, and I suspect it will remain unchanged for a long, long time to come.

 
Celebaelin
480063.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 7:50 am Reply with quote

I've heard this before although IIRC it was phrased as something like 'formerly the King's move was like a cross between that of the Knight and the Queen in that the King could jump other pieces but the move was limited to two squares orthogonally or diagonally'. I have in the past tried to find a web source to confirm this but with no success so far, it would make for a very interesting game I think. Getting a checkmate would likely be a lot harder anyway.

 
Moosh
480130.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 9:13 am Reply with quote

There's always Stealth Chess if you want extra pieces. This gives you the Assassins, pieces that can move in a very odd way indeed.

 
Southpaw
480143.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 9:20 am Reply with quote

Continuing my mission to include some QI in every thread, I will now give you my QI fact regarding chess boards. Here goes.

If you place one 2 pence coin on the first square of a chessboard (ie, in one corner), then place 2 coins, one on top of the other, in the next square, then 4 in the next, 8 in the next, and so on to fill the board, the pile of coins in the 64th square will be 4 light years high.

There you go. Use it wisely.

 
exnihilo
480244.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 11:20 am Reply with quote

According to Pieclopedia the 'dauphin' was a name given to the piece which was once an 'alfil' and which became the bishop:

The Alfil is the predecessor of the modern Bishop. This piece very probably came from India, where its original name was one of the Sanskrit words for elephant: hasty or gaja. It was alternately known by both names. It is found in the earliest known forms of Chess, such as Chaturanga and Shatranj, and it is very probably one of the original Chess pieces. But there is a bit of uncertainty and even disagreement on this matter.

Persians called it Pil, the Persian word for elephant, and the Arabs modified this to Fil. At some point, the Arabic definite article got prepended, giving the name Alfil, meaning the elephant. When the names of Fil and Alfil reached Europe, they were meaningless to the Europeans. In trying to find some meaning in the name, Europeans often used similar sounding words in their own languages. Italians started calling it Alfiere, which meant flag-bearer. The French began calling it delfino, which suggested "dauphin," the French crown prince. The French also played on the similarity in sound between fil and the French word fol, which is related to the English word fool. This led to the current French name for the piece, which is fou, meaning jester or fool.

The uncertainty is not over the piece's name. An elephant was, as far as anyone knows, one of the original pieces. The uncertainty is over how it moved. In both Shatranj and Chaturanga, it made a two-space diagonal leap, but Chaturanga was an Indian Contempory of Shatranj, and it is Shatranj, the Muslim form of Chess, that we actually have the earliest documentation for.

 
Ion Zone
480483.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 3:34 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
the King could jump other pieces but the move was limited to two squares orthogonally or diagonally'


That would make the king so much less useless. :]



How come Chess got to be such a feminist game? Or was it that a real king changed the rules as an underhanded way of calling his wife a battleaxe? :D

 
zomgmouse
480684.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 7:27 pm Reply with quote

Southpaw wrote:
Continuing my mission to include some QI in every thread, I will now give you my QI fact regarding chess boards. Here goes.

If you place one 2 pence coin on the first square of a chessboard (ie, in one corner), then place 2 coins, one on top of the other, in the next square, then 4 in the next, 8 in the next, and so on to fill the board, the pile of coins in the 64th square will be 4 light years high.

There you go. Use it wisely.


Wasn't there a myth/legend/perhaps true story about an Indian pauper who tricked the sultan by asking him for a grain of wheat on one square of the chess board, then two on the next, then four, then eight etc. etc.?

 
Sadurian Mike
480685.  Thu Jan 15, 2009 7:28 pm Reply with quote

I heard it as a blacksmith but the eseence of the story stays the sqme./

 
Southpaw
480883.  Fri Jan 16, 2009 5:14 am Reply with quote

It's essentially a way of explaining exponential growth: I first saw it in the context of illustrating how fast cells can multiply. It takes only about 47 cell divisions to make a tall adult man.

 
Alfred E Neuman
480898.  Fri Jan 16, 2009 5:40 am Reply with quote

Ion Zone wrote:
How come Chess got to be such a feminist game? Or was it that a real king changed the rules as an underhanded way of calling his wife a battleaxe? :D


To reflect the real balance of power in most homes?

 
exnihilo
481311.  Fri Jan 16, 2009 11:36 am Reply with quote

In early versions of the game the King was accompanied by a minister/counsellor/vizier rather than a queen - which makes sense, a relatively weak, stationary piece with a powerful, commanding servant. This piece was called a ferz which with the vagaries of European languages got mashed around until it became vierge in French, meaning maiden, which led to associations with the Virgin Mary, Queen of Heaven. In most European languages the piece is still called things like dame, donna, where in English it became Queen.

 
bobwilson
490647.  Tue Jan 27, 2009 5:15 pm Reply with quote

Southpaw wrote:
It's essentially a way of explaining exponential growth: I first saw it in the context of illustrating how fast cells can multiply. It takes only about 47 cell divisions to make a tall adult man.


Just to be pedantic - isn't constant doubling geometric rather than exponential growth?

 
Flash
490825.  Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:38 pm Reply with quote

According to a note eggshaped added to a question in the Flotsam show about how many times you can fold a piece of paper in half:
Quote:
a standard piece of paper folded 51 times would reach from the Earth to the Sun

Tragically, Stephen didn't use it.

 
bobwilson
490833.  Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:53 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
According to a note eggshaped added to a question in the Flotsam show about how many times you can fold a piece of paper in half:
Quote:
a standard piece of paper folded 51 times would reach from the Earth to the Sun

Tragically, Stephen didn't use it.


Well that's just silly isn't it?

There's no such thing as a "standard piece of paper"
you can't fold a piece of paper 51 times
Even if you could it would be smaller than it's original size

If you mean dividing a piece of paper 51 times to lengthen it - well then I could see where you were driving at

 

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