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grammar

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dadge
386070.  Sun Jul 27, 2008 12:30 pm Reply with quote

A rich vein of misbelief! As an aficionado of alt.usage.english I'd be happy to wrangle a few QIQ ideas.

Here's a few from Paul Brians' excellent website: http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/nonerrors.html

atb, a

 
mckeonj
386090.  Sun Jul 27, 2008 2:01 pm Reply with quote

Are the rules of grammar descriptive or prescriptive?

 
suze
386220.  Sun Jul 27, 2008 4:08 pm Reply with quote

We had a conversation based on that very webpage once before - it started at post 301009.

The answer to John's question depends on when one asks it. As grammar was traditionally taught - certainly in the British and North American education systems until the 1960s - the rules are prescriptive.

I don't advocate a return to that rigid approach, and neither do I care for the school of thought which says that grammar should not be taught at all. The modern trend is to teach grammar as descriptive, and in general it's one with which I agree. (It would have been nice if that section of the national curriculum had been written by someone who knew about grammar; "I have fell" is described in that document as a non standard form - which it absolutely is - and also as a past tense form - which it just isn't. Grrr.)

 
dadge
386294.  Sun Jul 27, 2008 5:48 pm Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
Are the rules of grammar descriptive or prescriptive?


Well, rules are always prescriptive. Grammar can be either.

A

 
Ian Dunn
505098.  Mon Feb 16, 2009 3:35 am Reply with quote

I would like to deviate from grammar and into punctuation.

I just want to say than an ellipsis is a ...

 
suze
505244.  Mon Feb 16, 2009 7:00 am Reply with quote

It is, assuming that you - in common with most people, it must be said - neglected to end the sentence with a period ... .

There is actually a single character ellipsis available , but the device of typing three dots is rather more common. Then again, some (mostly in North America) prefer the Chicago ellipsis which makes use of non-breaking spaces . . . , so called because the Chicago Manual of Style recommends it.

 
zomgmouse
505247.  Mon Feb 16, 2009 7:01 am Reply with quote

On a mac the ellipsis is option+semicolon.

 
Ian Dunn
505448.  Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:34 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
It is, assuming that you - in common with most people, it must be said - neglected to end the sentence with a period ... .

There is actually a single character ellipsis available , but the device of typing three dots is rather more common. Then again, some (mostly in North America) prefer the Chicago ellipsis which makes use of non-breaking spaces . . . , so called because the Chicago Manual of Style recommends it.


Should there be a space between the ellipsis and the period?

 
suze
505479.  Mon Feb 16, 2009 12:21 pm Reply with quote

It should be a thin space really; does the software used here support them ... ?

a a (thin space)
a a (normal space)

Yes!

 

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