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Greeley, Father Andrew

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AnneB
442664.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 2:30 pm Reply with quote

Here's what he has to say about himself:

Quote:
One of the most influential Catholic thinkers and writers of our time, priest, sociologist, author and journalist Father Andrew M. Greeley has built an international assemblage of devout fans over a career that spans five decades. He is the author of over 50 best-selling novels and more than 100 works of non-fiction and his writing has been translated into 12 languages. A Professor of Sociology at the University of Arizona and a Research Associate with the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, Father Greeley is a respected scholar whose current research focuses on the Sociology of Religion.


http://www.agreeley.com/author.html


Some judiciously edited stuff from Wiki:

Quote:
After studies at Archbishop Quigley Preparatory Seminary in Chicago, he received an AB from St. Mary of the Lake Seminary in Chicago in 1950, an STB in 1952, and an STL in 1954, when he was ordained.

His fiction often deals with romances, including details of sexual encounters, typically written with underpinnings of theology. His major characters tend to be Irish-American Catholics from Chicago, and one example of this is John Blackwood "Blackie" Ryan, a mystery-solving clergyman (first priest, then bishop), who is apparently one of Greeley's alter egos and who is sometimes compared, not always favorably, with G. K. Chesterton's Father Brown.

Greeley's first work of fiction to become a major commercial success was The Cardinal Sins (1981). He then put out the Passover Trilogy: Thy Brother's Wife (1982), Ascent into Hell (1983), and Lord of the Dance (1984). After that, he wrote on average a minimum of two novels per year. In 1987 alone he produced four novels and two works of non-fiction. His literary output has been such that it has been said that he "has never had an unpublished thought".

His book entitled A Stupid, Unjust, and Criminal War: Iraq 20012007 (2007), succinctly evaluates and presents the logic of the rush to start the Iraqi War by the Bush administration and its consequences for the United States.

He suffered a fractured skull and left orbital bone near his eye in a fall on November 7, 2008 in Rosemont, Illinois, when his clothing got caught on the door of a taxi as it pulled away, and was hospitalized in critical condition.[2]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Greeley


I personally like his politics. I find his writing of sex from the points of view of female characters to be...interesting.

Hope he gets better, though.

 
Ion Zone
442695.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 5:25 pm Reply with quote

He sounds like a strange character.

 
Sebastian flyte
442715.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 6:01 pm Reply with quote

I'm due a trip to the library this Saturday (yes I go to the library for kicks, but you people might understand this..) and I'm going to see if I can get one, I've never read anything like it, but you never know!!! Should be worth it just to think 'priest writing about girl sex..' and titter a bit.
I had a look on Daddies bookshelves in his study for one of his 'improving' catholic non fiction titles but found none so they might be a little American centred? Either that or he has hordes of the fiction range in his bedside cabinet well thumbed.. I'm surprised I didn't hear about him until today.

That does sound a horrible injury I will keep an eye out for his name in the prayer book at church I bet it's there!!! (those saucy old dears!!) :)
The list of his works on wiki was staggering! I'm glad you made this thread AnneB :)

 
bobwilson
442751.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 7:27 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
I'm due a trip to the library this Saturday (yes I go to the library for kicks, but you people might understand this..)


Does your library still have books? My local library has been taken over by (variously) a large computer area mostly populated by people using yahoo chat; a "learning zone" which is usually just an excuse to put on an exhibition of second rate local "art"; a space for selling off "unpopular" books (ie ones that aren't borrowed much - this is, in my opinion, brilliant because it gives me the chance to buy decent books for 10p.

There's still a fairly (physically) extensive fiction section but it's full of Harry Potter, Jeffrey Archer, Barbara Cartland, and whatever's the current flavour of the month. The reference section is accessible only after negotiating a Krypton Factor like challenge; and getting a copy of a volume of Statutes in Force involves finding a librarian, waiting until he's got a spare half hour, asking him to descend to the bowels of the building to obtain the relevant volume, discovering this isn't the one you actually wanted, waiting another half hour, sending said librarian back to the basement with a fresh spec, all to look up one simple clause.

As for the Encyclopedia Brittanica, Principia Mathematica, Shakespeare, etc - these can be ordered from other libraries on payment of a facilitation fee and will arrive approximately 21 days after the request.

Oh - and people are encouraged to treat the library as a meeting place so there's plenty of banter for you to listen in to about how Stacey isn't going out with Gavin any more since Julia told her about Bob's infidelity.

 
suze
442764.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 8:00 pm Reply with quote

Sadly bob, I recognise your description of what public libraries are become. Chatham library is just hopeless. It had to leave one building in a hurry for "health and safety reasons" which were never made public, and the new building doesn't have a proper reference room - the reference collection was dispersed when the old building was closed.

Rochester library is little better, and it too was "improved" by moving to a smaller building, getting rid of the reference room and instead installing lots of Yahoo Chat machines and the ability to hire PlayStation games.

Maidstone library is rather better - unless one is a wheelchair user, in which case it's out of bounds - but that's a Kent library and Medway residents aren't ordinarily allowed to belong to it. (Unless they work in Kent, which I do.) Maidstone used to have a rather good reference only library at another site, but it was closed and demolished and is now the site of a housing development that they won't be able to sell.

 
bobwilson
442768.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 8:07 pm Reply with quote

ah - but suze - it's all done in the cause of "inclusiveness" - so that's alright then. (PS - any news?)

 
suze
442770.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 8:10 pm Reply with quote

But of course!

Except, that is, that those of us who might want to read books other than mass market fiction (with a strong bias towards mass market fiction of the 1970s, since the book buying budget is rather limited - both Medway and Kent have Conservative councils), are not included ...

 
bobwilson
442772.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 8:21 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Except, that is, that those of us who might want to read books other than mass market fiction (with a strong bias towards mass market fiction of the 1970s, since the book buying budget is rather limited - both Medway and Kent have Conservative councils), are not included ...


Tut tut - I thought your English was much better than that......

 
Jenny
442827.  Thu Nov 20, 2008 11:04 pm Reply with quote

I like the studied litotes of the Wiki editor's remark about his priest detective character being compared 'not always favourably' with G K Chesterton's Father Brown.

 
Moosh
442876.  Fri Nov 21, 2008 5:21 am Reply with quote

Gosh, you've made me really appreciate having access to a University Library.

Saying that, the public library in Stafford is actually quite good, it has the computers and art galleries and so on, but it still has reference rooms and a non-fiction floor and the fiction selection is also pretty good and not restricted to Harry Potter and his ilk.

I do hope Father Greeley gets better, the world needs more unusual characters.

 
AnneB
442885.  Fri Nov 21, 2008 5:48 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
I like the studied litotes of the Wiki editor's remark about his priest detective character being compared 'not always favourably' with G K Chesterton's Father Brown.


That's actually a quote repeated in many of the Blackie Ryan books--Blackie says it about himself.

 
Southpaw
442888.  Fri Nov 21, 2008 6:02 am Reply with quote

Gosh, I feel lucky then. Our local library has a non-fiction section of a roughly equal size to the fiction one, including an excellent science section. It also carries every one of Richard Dawkins' books, which is a bonus in my humble opinion.

 
suze
442996.  Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:40 am Reply with quote

There won't be too many public libraries more impressive than Central Library on Georgia in Vancouver. It's a nine storey building (the library occupies a mere seven, two are rented out as office space), open 10 til 9 six days a week (and on Sunday afternoons), and reckons to hold 1.4 million items.

Sadly, I never got to use it much - it only opened on its current site in 1995, and between then and 1998 when I emigrated I spent most of my time in Alberta.

British public libraries vary enormously. It's my misfortune that the Medway ones really aren't much good, but I can recommend the one in Cambridge (as at a few years back, at any rate). I'm being told that Stevenage is pretty good too, although I've not been to it.

 
Sebastian flyte
443506.  Sat Nov 22, 2008 8:32 am Reply with quote

They didn't have any unless I couldn't find them and I wasn't going to ask.

 
AnneB
443697.  Sat Nov 22, 2008 4:33 pm Reply with quote

Rats to that, then.

 

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