View previous topic | View next topic

Potty Mouthed Young Ladies

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

Arcane
425193.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 8:29 pm Reply with quote

The "c" word is one word I just can't bear to say. When I stated that once in a group of men, one of them (very funny man he is) decided to start singing a popular song at the time, using only c**t... Har dee har. (see - I can't even type it...)

I have to curtail my tendency to mild potty mouthedness since I have a 10 year old around the house. However, I see no difference in who says the swear word - it's a swear word no matter the gender of the person whose mouth it comes out of.

I tend to say "bugger" and "bloody/hell" a bit, which I know I shouldn't, but, eh. But the "f" and "s" word I don't drop unless my daughter isn't around, and then usually in repeating an anecdote it appeared in. Again, words I really try not to use.

A friend of mine taught me a couple of good replacement words: "fudgemuffinsundae" is surprisingly satisfying instead of the "f" word, and "poobumwee" was another one. Said fast enough, people just hear a bit of nonsense.

More than objecting to whatever gender is swearing, I do get annoyed with the over use of some four letter words in movies and TV. I rarely hear people use that amount of 4 letter words in real life; but then again, that form of media rarely reflects the real world anyway... :-S I think it takes more effort and more use of the grey matter to write a script where every few words isn't of the four letter variety. You can express emotion quite adequately without resorting to those words, to my mind, it's laziness and a cop out. An actor saying "How dare you!" always has more dramatic power to me than just dropping an F word in there. I can't also bear to watch Gordon Ramsey... it gets so monotonous after a while... plus, the man terrifies me.

 
bobwilson
425199.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 8:40 pm Reply with quote

Oh I totally agree reddygirl

Quote:
I think it takes more effort and more use of the grey matter to write a script where every few words isn't of the four letter variety. You can express emotion quite adequately without resorting to those words, to my mind, it's laziness and a cop out. An actor saying "How dare you!" always has more dramatic power to me than just dropping an F word in there.


When writing a script for a contemporary drama it's much more inventive to have your characters say something like:

"How dare you, you how dare you" before flouncing off stage

I can see how "What the fuck is going on here" could be better written by an imaginative screenwriter as "What the how dare you is going on here" or "We're seriously fucked" could be rendered as "We're How dare you'd"

 
suze
425200.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 8:42 pm Reply with quote

reddygirl wrote:
I have to curtail my tendency to mild potty mouthedness since I have a 10 year old around the house.


That's fair enough, but when she's a bit older and it becomes clear that she knows all those words for herself, will you feel differently?

In our house, we decided that when my stepdaughter turned 16 we'd no longer tell her off if she used a rude word, and neither would we consciously avoid using one in front of her.

And the air didn't turn blue overnight - all three of us say what we mean, and all three of us mean a rude word once in a while!

 
bobwilson
425202.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 8:49 pm Reply with quote

blueshearer wrote:
lets get this straight

c*** is generally used as an abusive word as in you C*** by men
tw** is used as an abusive word as in you T*** by men
f*** is used because its more accepted on tv for a variety of reasons including for its original intention as a description of having sex

yes and emilys have reclaimed the words because men were using words that referred to their genitalia as derogative terms. The worrying thing is the ease with which they were used at todays match by the young ladies. I can honestly say none of these young ladies were militant feminists

even as an older person who often uses these words in the ways mentioned above I can know the differnce between using the words creatively or abusively

Thanks for the grammatic education above - you obviously went back to university after your successful goalkeeping career but im not at work anymore and errors are inevitable. I apologise to all you literary wizzkids - too much Jilly reading poste Dante. I'll never forget your fantastic double save at wembley


"yes and emilys have reclaimed the words "

By "emilys" I presume you mean feminists, or militant feminists, or lesbians or something? Is this some euphemism with I am unfamiliar?

You see, what I find offensive is the way that some people will package other groups of people into a "non-offensive" term. I'm not totally sure which group you are calling "emilys" but it's the fact that you are defining a group which I find offensive. You could be referring to members of the Women's Institute and I'd still find it offensive.

You state with authority that none of these young females were militant feminists. I presume you interviewed them individually to canvass their views? Did you address them as Emily on each occasion?

What it comes down to is that you were verbally abused by some young women, and threatened with violence apparently, and this has reinforced your impression that modern society is full of Emilys (whatever that is) who are hell-bent on stealing your pension.

 
Timon
425203.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 8:59 pm Reply with quote

Goodness! My ears are burning.

Who started all this swearing here?..... Was it you Bob Wilson?
It is obviously a case of "you can take the man out of Highbury, but you can't take the Highbury out of the man".

 
Arcane
425206.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:06 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Oh I totally agree reddygirl

Quote:
I think it takes more effort and more use of the grey matter to write a script where every few words isn't of the four letter variety. You can express emotion quite adequately without resorting to those words, to my mind, it's laziness and a cop out. An actor saying "How dare you!" always has more dramatic power to me than just dropping an F word in there.


When writing a script for a contemporary drama it's much more inventive to have your characters say something like:

"How dare you, you how dare you" before flouncing off stage

I can see how "What the fuck is going on here" could be better written by an imaginative screenwriter as "What the how dare you is going on here" or "We're seriously fucked" could be rendered as "We're How dare you'd"


"bobwilson: sarcasmometer turned up to 11."

 
bobwilson
425207.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:09 pm Reply with quote

I don't think you need to go that high Reddy - I'm sure I blew the fuses at 3

 
bobwilson
425208.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:12 pm Reply with quote

Timon wrote:
Goodness! My ears are burning.

Who started all this swearing here?..... Was it you Bob Wilson?
It is obviously a case of "you can take the man out of Highbury, but you can't take the Highbury out of the man".


I think you'll find it was some young women acquainted with a certain septuagenarian who began all the use of foul language. Or at least the reports received from said pensioner.

 
blueshearer
425209.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:12 pm Reply with quote

This is a complete misrepresentation - I use the term emilys as a term which will be familiar though not accepted by all militant feminists as a reference to one of my heroines Emily Pankhurst who if you are unaware was one of the major protagonists in securing the vote for women in the twenties. Check out some other of my feminist heroines Helen Suzman who fought against apartheid, Paula Rego referenced in another forum, Sylvia Plath the tragic but great poet and in more popular culture Patti Smith. As far as interviewing the young ladies about their particular political ideologies I concentrated on comforting the one with the injured hand whose parents had unfortunately given her the name Chardonnay - and vintage though she was (we all have our slips) didnt feel at the time up to political discussion of any sort though I did question the purpose of her violent tendency. The other two young ladies were to busy cowering in a corner away from the spotlight of the stewards as they didnt want to be thrown out of the ground which I would have prevented as they were clearly passionate in their drunken and aggressive manner about the football team they support. I know I will see them at West Bromwich Albion and will ask them if they are willing to share their political ideologies with someone who is interested on an internet forum. I will let you know in the next few weeks.

 
Timon
425214.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:23 pm Reply with quote

blueshearer wrote:
...one of my heroines Emily Pankhurst ...


In my youth I spent a couple of long holidays visiting her family home on the Isle of Wight. It is a huge rambling place, but not very comfortable.

 
bobwilson
425215.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:23 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
I know I will see them at West Bromwich Albion and will ask them if they are willing to share their political ideologies with someone who is interested on an internet forum. I will let you know in the next few weeks.


By all means - do direct them to a person who is willing to discuss rather than categorise.

But by "emilys" would I be correct in assuming you mean females who assert the right of a woman to assert the rights of a woman? Or would you prefer some other definition?

 
bobwilson
425216.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:25 pm Reply with quote

(and as for Sylvia Plath - if that sad excuse for a human is considered a feminist icon then there really is no hope) although I agree with Patti Smith

 
Timon
425220.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:30 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
.... a certain septuagenarian....

Is that another word for "lizard fancier"?

 
bobwilson
425222.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:33 pm Reply with quote

nah - it's another word for blueshearer

 
blueshearer
425229.  Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:40 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
(and as for Sylvia Plath - if that sad excuse for a human is considered a feminist icon then there really is no hope) although I agree with Patti Smith


So feminism excludes women who are vulnerable, ill or have been abused and instead sticks to ones who demonstrate their affirmation by retaining traditionally removed body hair - whose categorising now? No wonder many females feel vulnerable and end up either ill or militant

 

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group