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Gurkhas

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Flash
416555.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 9:25 am Reply with quote

Eric the Underwriter wrote:
What ever you do.......do not accept a curry from them.

The local take away can't compete with the burn factor!

Sorry, but that's not true either. Possibly you've found a restaurant in the UK which is Nepalese and which serves very hot curries to its English clientele, but what they eat at home is quite mild.

 
Schlubalybub
416557.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 9:28 am Reply with quote

The thing is, when you go for a curry, a lot of people pretend to like really hot curries, and it turns into a competition, so that the hot curries are the ones that are the best sellers

 
Eric the Underwriter
416558.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 9:29 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Eric the Underwriter wrote:
What ever you do.......do not accept a curry from them.

The local take away can't compete with the burn factor!

Sorry, but that's not true either. Possibly you've found a restaurant in the UK which is Nepalese and which serves very hot curries to its English clientele, but what they eat at home is quite mild.


SENTA in mid wales.

 
Moosh
416612.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 10:25 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
a certain new jersey based healthcare professional


lmao that's excellent.

And yes, he should have one.

 
Nigelblt
416623.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 10:40 am Reply with quote

Tony Hart, of Vision On fame, was an officer in the 1st Gurkha Rifles.

 
Sadurian Mike
416684.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:30 pm Reply with quote

reddygirl wrote:
I'm also wondering if the blade is curved because it gives the illusion of the sword being a different length? I know it's used for different things along with clearing undergrowth, but it would be definitely another handy factor in battle if the enemy didn't quite know how long the blade was (I think they discussed the same thing in the movie "Gladiator" based on a Thracian sword, it too was slightly curved).

The design of the kukri has evolved over the centuries to be most efficient as a chopping tool and weapon. This is the reason for the curve and the thickness of the end of the blade, just like the British 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre (which was accused by its opponents of being a "terror weapon") the thickening of the end of the kukri's blade adds considerable power to the swing.




British 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre; notice the thickening at the end of the blade.

The Thracians had the falx (which came in different sizes, from sword to polearm) which was also curved forward to concentrate the power of the blow.


In addition, the ancient Greeks and Egyptians had swords that curved forward for the same reason.

The point about curving forwards is that the power of the blow concentrates in a very small area of the blade and so increases the damage done. Curving backwards has the opposite effect; it spreads the power over a larger area but allows the stroke to "follow through" more efficiently. This has the effect of slicing, which causes deeper and longer cuts against bare flesh or light armour but is less efficient against heavier armour, notably metal. It also requires better metal for the blade because there is a longer edge to maintain at peak sharpness.

 
Sadurian Mike
416687.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:38 pm Reply with quote

Izzardesque wrote:
I have a napoleonic era heavy cavalry sword.

They look impressive but were not liked by the troops who used them. The design was very heavy and awkward to use, and they were actually less efficient than the light cavalry sword.

Mr Sharpe notwithstanding, Napoleonic infantry officers who had the opportunity would equip themselves with light cavalry sabres rather than heavy cavalry ones. The infantry sabre was a much straighter affair (and varied considerably as many officers would have them made to their own design) as it was used to thrust with, almost in the manner of fencing. It was, however, a fairly lightweight weapon and not ideal to knocking aside enemy bayonet-equipped muskets. The heavier light cavalry sabre was thus a more practical weapon for actual combat.

 
Sadurian Mike
416688.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:46 pm Reply with quote

Schlubalybub wrote:
The thing is, when you go for a curry, a lot of people pretend to like really hot curries, and it turns into a competition, so that the hot curries are the ones that are the best sellers

In Hong Kong, the Gurkha cooks made the best curry I have ever had (I was a mere youth at the time, it was my Dad who was posted out there). The Officers' Mess served a family dinner every Sunday, which consisted of a huge curry buffet with as much trimming and accompaniments as you could wish for.

The strength on offer varied from mild (this was 1978) to burning hot (approached only by veterans), much as you see on modern Indian restaurant menus.

Needless to say, what the Officers' Mess cooks prepared and what the Ghurka squaddies ate in their own Mess or made for themselves can't really be compared. I doubt that goat was served up to the European officers for a start.

 
Froj
416707.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:01 pm Reply with quote

gruff5 wrote:
I don't know much about Gurkhas currently signed up with the UK army and getting a salary for fighting in Iraq, say.

Do they fall into the category of foreign mercenaries?


Since I don't think this was ever answered, Protocol 1 of the Geneva Conventions states that the Gurkhas are not mercenaries.

 
Arcane
416750.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 5:37 pm Reply with quote

Thanks Mike for that information, that's explained some things about swords I didn't know. The pictures are great as well!

 
Sadurian Mike
416767.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 6:05 pm Reply with quote

You're more than welcome.

Swords and blades is a large enough topic to fill a thread by itself, let alone including other melee weapons in the mix. If you like the pictures then how about this? A flammard, a Renaissance wavy-bladed greatsword primarily used for ceremonials. One of the more unusual sword designs out there.



Back for a minute to the thickening of the end of the blade to increase the power of the blow, I really ought to mention that the same design is seen in the medieval falchion, a sword developed to hack through heavy armour, in cutlasses, and in more modern machetes.


Falchion (one of many different designs of the same concept).


Machetes for comparison.

 
HerrBen
416778.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 7:16 pm Reply with quote

Izzardesque wrote:
Is that the one Sharpe swings about before bedding the women?


We'd all be speaking French if it wasn't for that lad.

 
Arcane
416798.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 8:54 pm Reply with quote

Wow Mike, that flammard is gorgeous! (bet that doesn't get said very often). Why is the blade wavy? I know you said for ceremonial purposes, but I've never seen a sword with a wavy blade....

And you should start up a thread on swords if it hasn't been done so already!

 
AlmondFacialBar
416844.  Fri Oct 03, 2008 2:59 am Reply with quote

i second the swords thread, YAY! :-)

and i fear i'll find myself photoshopping house with a cane sword in the course of the news few days. i'm hopeless.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Arcane
416864.  Fri Oct 03, 2008 3:27 am Reply with quote

I want to see the pic when it's done AFB!!!

 

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