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Racists comments about South Africans

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Alfred E Neuman
415927.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 8:53 am Reply with quote

Loved it.

Just trying to work out the accent though. Sounds Aussie to me.

 
Arcane
415956.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 9:17 am Reply with quote

Spitting Image was an UK outfit though. You're right AEN, there is a touch of what sounds like Aussie about it - possibly because the person who did it sounds as if they were London/Cockney-ish (which is where I believe a lot of the current Aussie accent originated from).

 
suze
416048.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 11:06 am Reply with quote

Incidentally, that song was written by none other than John Lloyd!

 
Arcane
416058.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 11:19 am Reply with quote

*TING*

There's your small world again!

 
Sherbrooke
821261.  Fri Jun 03, 2011 5:06 am Reply with quote

What was that internet syndrome that one knows when a discussion has become moot the minute someone mentions Hitler or Nazis? (Well I have now haven't I?)

All these bad things are behind us now (apartheid), as a South African, we are moving on to better things and have, hopefully, learned from history.

As for our sense of humour, it tends to be a melting pot. We have been exposed to so much humour from around the world that we probably appreciate most of it. Perhaps that is why we enjoy QI so much.

 
bobwilson
821442.  Fri Jun 03, 2011 11:05 pm Reply with quote

I think you mean Godwin's Law Sherbrooke.

But strictly speaking that applies when you compare an opponent to the Nazi's (as in - "that's what the Nazi's said/did"). I don't think it applies when you just mention the Nazi's.

Quote:
As for our sense of humour, it tends to be a melting pot. We have been exposed to so much humour from around the world that we probably appreciate most of it. Perhaps that is why we enjoy QI so much.


Much as I realise you're trying to be positive I have a problem with "our sense of humour", "we have been", "we probably", "we enjoy".

When exactly did you take a poll (straw or otherwise) to determine this collective view? Don't get me wrong - British people are equally guilty of this kind of projection (and as has been pointed out in my mention of matters involving pillows, I myself lapse into it now and then).

There is no such thing as a South African, or a Brit (continue ad nauseum).

 
Posital
821454.  Sat Jun 04, 2011 2:43 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
British people are equally guilty of this kind of projection
[...]
I myself lapse into it now

lol

 
Sherbrooke
821468.  Sat Jun 04, 2011 3:55 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Much as I realise you're trying to be positive I have a problem with "our sense of humour", "we have been", "we probably", "we enjoy".

When exactly did you take a poll (straw or otherwise) to determine this collective view? Don't get me wrong - British people are equally guilty of this kind of projection (and as has been pointed out in my mention of matters involving pillows, I myself lapse into it now and then).


I realise that perhaps it sounds as if I am generalising and perhaps to a certain extent I am. My experience of SA humour comes from the people I have met all over the country. I work with all sectors of the public and have found most people I come into contact with have some sort of sense of humour, so my "poll" would be personal experience.

There are always those that do not have a sense of humour: usually people tainted by hate, anger, rage and violence. These people are found in all countries and cultures and yes, I have met some of them from all ranges of our varied political spectrum as well as from other countries I have visited (not necessarily Anglophone).

 
bobwilson
821884.  Sun Jun 05, 2011 10:48 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
I realise that perhaps it sounds as if I am generalising


Quote:
My experience of SA humour


Can you also point me to "SA musical taste"? I only mention it so that I can ensure that the next time I get a visit from a random SA I can make sure the relevant piece is playing on the jukebox to make him feel welcome?

I know a SA who doesn't like Eddie Izzard. Could you use your unique insight to tell me whether this is aberrant behaviour or reflects accurately "SA humour"?

I guess that the homogenous SA humour must come from having used the appropriate laws to exterminate anyone who didn't get the joke? Well thank God that you SA's have stopped "generalising" now in the new multi-cultural republic.

Quote:
There are always those that do not have a sense of humour: usually people tainted by hate, anger, rage and violence.


Nah - these people who don't have a sense of humour - you can find them all over the world. They just refuse to get the joke. Curmudgeons.

I'll believe you've moved on when you stop referring to "SA humour", and "we". (Not that SA is uniquely guilty - the same can be said of the UK).

 
samivel
821943.  Mon Jun 06, 2011 6:14 am Reply with quote

So it's wrong to generalise, we get the point. But then it's not as if you're free from generalising yourself, is it? Grouping all journalists together as idiots, all politicians as idiots, all BBC staff as idiots, all civil servants as... well, you get the idea.

 
CB27
821959.  Mon Jun 06, 2011 8:00 am Reply with quote

Generalisation is not about saying everybody is the same, it's about shared tastes and traits which are more common than others.

Of course, I'm speaking in general here, in some places it might be that everyone's identical :)

 
Jenny
822032.  Mon Jun 06, 2011 2:38 pm Reply with quote

I'm not.

 
dr.bob
822113.  Tue Jun 07, 2011 3:57 am Reply with quote

I'm an individual, just like everyone else.

 
Sherbrooke
822158.  Tue Jun 07, 2011 7:22 am Reply with quote

When I talk about SA humour, I'm not saying that everyone has the same sense of humour or even necessarily find the same things funny, but each culture must have shared items of humour that pertain specifically to that country. We have a comedian called Leon Schuster. Some people find him funny, some do not, however his humour has a SA "flavour". He pokes fun at SA politicians and celebrities, SA radio shows, local sports stars, local cuisine and local news items. This humour would not be understood by anyone who does not experience these things on a daily basis. In Canada the "newfies" are joked about. People who do know what a "newfie" is, might not enjoy the joke.

This means that there are shared experiences that makes a culture unique.

As for the music: there are certain somgs like "Shosholoza" and the "Waka waka song" (from the World cup) that tend to cross cultures and seem to be enjoyed by everyone, not necessarily because they are good songs but because of the shared experience from living together as a culture and no matter what taste you may have certain things just strike a national chord. Unity in diversity.

 
CB27
822187.  Tue Jun 07, 2011 9:49 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
I'm not.

There's always one...

Or two...

 

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